Month: October 2018

The Round House reborn.

Wilson cut the ribbon on the Oliver N. Freeman Round House and Museum of African-American History Sunday. I was blessed with the opportunity to draft most of the text accompanying the permanent exhibit and to curate much of the content. I’m so happy and so proud and so honored and so humbled. Preserving and presenting the history of the community that raised me is my ministry.

… “Oh? I’m on the program?”

I was too geeked about the museum to think straight enough to rehearse something, so I just let my heart speak. I said that I was born at all-black Mercy Hospital just before it closed. I was born on the cusp of segregation and integration — Wilson as it was and as it would be. Though I have not lived in Wilson for more than 30 years, something powerful that I had absorbed on Carolina Street, where I spent my first decade, or Queen Street, where my father grew up, or Elba Street, where my grandmother grew up, had stayed with me. I began to curate Black Wide Awake in 2015 as a way to preserve and present the stories of the people and places of home. Since then, I’ve gained as much I’ve given, including the singular honor of contributing to and creating for the Round House museum. I’m honored and deeply grateful, I said.

Photo by Janelle Booth Clevinger.

Congressman G.K. Butterfield, Jr., friend and neighbor, son of East Wilson, took the mic and gave tribute to the real MVP, William E. “Bill” Myers, whose tenacious vision over nearly two decades bent larger Wilson toward doing right by the historical and cultural legacy of our side of the tracks. Mr. Myers was feeling a little under the weather and could not be present, but surely felt the waves of love and appreciation rolling toward him from Nash Street.

George K. Butterfield, Jr., United Stated House of Representatives. (And The Monitors? Well, get to know them.)

With that, Michael E. Myers, Board chairman Ken Jones, and the Freeman family cut the ribbon, and the community stepped into the full flower of the renovated Round House and Museum.

East Wilson bona fides: in the museum’s foyer, W. and C., two of Bill Myers’ grandsons. Both are descendants of Judith Davis, Rev. Fred M. Davis, William B. Davis and Parker Battle. In addition, W. is descended from “Picture-Taking” George W. Barnes and Benjamin Mincey.

The Round House itself is now largely dedicated to the life and accomplishments of Oliver N. Freeman.

Before the crowd arrives.

A little interactive oral history.

The medical history of East Wilson.

 

Two members of the Round House board of directors — Jean Wynn Jones, Darden Class of ’52, and one of the first Girl Scouts in Troop 11, and Inez Dickerson Bell, Darden Class of ’44.

 

Please support the Freeman Round House and African-American Museum. Admission is free, but donations are vital to this small institution’s mission and are much appreciated. 

http://www.theroundhousemuseum.com

1202 Nash Street East, Wilson, North Carolina

Cemeteries, no. 22: John and Bettie Hinnant Jones family cemetery.

This small family cemetery is adjacent to the Sane Williams graveyard, described here.

The graves of John A. Jones and Bettie Hinnant Jones lie under two of the brick vault covers seen below.

——

In the 1880 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Dempsy Powell, 52, farmer; wife Sallie, 46; daughter Susan A. Jones, 27, and her husband John A. Jones, 34; their children Thomas A., 13, Jessee B., 11, James A., 7, Celia C., 5, Sallie C., 4, and John A., 1; and W.D. Lucus, 21, laborer.

John A. Jones, 20, of Old Fields, son of John A. and Susan Jones, married Celia Williamson, 18, of Old Fields, daughter of Spencer and Senia Williamson, on 17 January 1898 at Jim Jones’.Witnesses included Thomas A. Jones.

In the 1900 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer General V. Hinnant, 38; wife Martha A., 35; and children Alice V., 13, Minnie A., 12, Ezekiel, 11, Bettie J., 9, William V., 4, Oscar, 2, and Herman, 2.

In the 1910 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer Vandorne Hinnant, 48; wife Betsy J., 46; and children Ezekial, 22, Bettie, 19, Willie, 13, Oscar, 12, Luther, 10, Regest W., 9, Roland, 8, Ralon, 6, Ollien, 4, and Roy E., 2.

J.A. Jones, 34, son of John A. and Susan Jones, of Old Fields, married Bettie Hinnant, 21, daughter of Vandorn and Janie Hinnant, of Springhill township, on 5 May 1912. Missionary Baptist minister William H. Mitchiner performed the ceremony at the Hinnant home.

In 1918, John Alce Jones registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he resided at R.F.D.#1, Sims; was born 25 January 1897; was a self-employed farmer; and Bettie Jones was his nearest relative.

In the 1920 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: on Jones Hill Road, farmer J.A. Jones, 42; wife Bettie, 28; and children Johnie W., 16, Grover, 7, Susie, 5, Maomie, 4, and Ruth, 1.

In the 1930 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: John A. Jones, 53, farmer wife Bettie J., 39; and children Grover L., 17, Sussie J., 15, Namie, 13, and Ruth, 11.

John Asley Jones died 21 April 1962 in Rocky Mount, Nash County. Per his death certificate, he was born 25 October 1878 in Wilson County to John Allen Jones and Susan Powell; was married to Betty Hinnant; was a retired farmer; and lived in Sims, Wilson County.

Bettye Hinnant Jones died 21 May 1866 in Enfield, Halifax County, North Carolina. Per her death certificate, she was born 2 February 1891 in Wilson County to Vandorn Hinnant and Martha Jane Horton; was widowed; and resided in Sims, Wilson County.

Photographs by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

 

Where we worked: 1922 — D.

City directories offer fine-grained looks at a city’s residents at short intervals. The 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., directory reveals the types of work available to African-Americans during the booming tobacco era. This post is the fourth in an alphabetical series listing all “colored” directory entries for whom an occupation was listed. The address is the resident’s home, unless a business address is noted.

  • Dale, Lucy, midwife, 519 South Spring
  • Darden, Arthur N., (C.H.D. & Sons), 111 Pender
  • Darden, C.H. & Sons (C.H., C.L. & A.N.), undertakers, 608-610 East Nash
  • Darden, Camillus L., (C.H.D. & Sons), 500 East Green
  • Darden, Charles H., (C.H.D. & Sons), 111 Pender
  • Darden, Major, tobacco worker, 505 Smith
  • Darden, Wade, tobacco worker, 306 Spring Street Alley
  • Darden, Walter T., clerk – C.H. Darden & Sons), 111 Pender
  • Darden, Zadie, laundress, 903 Mercer
  • Darden’s Hall, 610 East Nash
  • Davis, Addie, teacher, 621 East Nash
  • Davis, Frederick, paperhanger, 621 East Nash
  • Davis, Godfrey, farmer, 803 Mercer
  • Davis, James, laborer, 609 Gay
  • Davis, James, laborer, 518 East Nash
  • Davis, John, laborer, 313 Stantonsburg Road
  • Davis, Laura, domestic, 511 East Green
  • Davis, Louisa, tobacco worker, 509 South Mercer
  • Davis, Luther, laborer, 609 Gay
  • Davis, Mamie, tobacco worker, 803 Mercer
  • Davis, Susan, tobacco worker, 515 Railroad
  • Davis, Tiney, tobacco worker, 509 South Mercer
  • Dawson, Jane, tobacco worker, 215 Stantonsburg Road
  • Day, Charles, cook, 305 Mercer
  • Deans, James T., Rev., 514 South Lodge
  • Deberry, Andrew, cook, 208 Sunshine Alley
  • Deberry, Charity, tobacco worker, 215 Stantonsburg Road
  • Deberry, Irene, cook, 614 East Green
  • Deberry, James, tobacco worker, 317 Stantonsburg Road
  • DeBose, James, laborer, 133 Ashe
  • DeBose, Lillie, domestic, 133 Ashe
  • Delicatessen, The, 519 East Nash, C.E. Artis proprietor
  • Dempsey, Mattie, tobacco worker, 412 South Spring
  • De Vaughn, Ethel, domestic, 212 Finch
  • De Vaughn, Lee, carpenter, 212 Finch
  • De Vaughn, Sarah, domestic, 305 North East
  • Dew, Daisy, cook, 604 South Lodge
  • Dew, Joseph, farmer, 705 South Goldsboro
  • Dew, Junius, tobacco worker, 604 South Lodge
  • Dew, Laura, laundress, East Nash extended
  • Dew, Lizzie, tobacco worker, 712 East Green
  • Dew, Ross, tobacco worker, 712 East Green
  • Dew, Willliam, fireman, 523 South Spring
  • Dew, Zeb, cook, 906 Mercer
  • Dewel, Harry, laborer, 204 Sunshine Alley
  • Dickens, Creecy, domestic, 116 Pender
  • Dickens, Paul, tobacco worker, 516 Church
  • Dickens, Richard, laborer, 116 Pender
  • Dickens, Washington, laborer, 600 Stantonsburg Road
  • Dickson, Herbert, tobacco worker, 414 Stantonsburg Road
  • Dickson, Lillie, tobacco worker, 414 Stantonsburg Road
  • Diggs, E. Hiram, barber – W.S. Hines, 205 North Vick
  • Diggs, Henry, farmer, 703 Suggs
  • Dillard, Annie M., student, 604 South Spring
  • Dixon, Alice, tobacco worker, 500 South Lodge
  • Dixon, Gladys, domestic, 406 Whitley
  • Dixon, William, shoe repairer, 500 South Lodge
  • Dowd, Cora, domestic, 516 Carroll
  • Drake, Grady, laborer, 215 Manchester
  • Drake, Sallie, laundress, 215 Manchester
  • Dubissette, Michael E., physician, 550 East Nash, (home) 911 East Green
  • Dudley, Henry, carpenter, 205 North Vick
  • Dunn, John, tobacco stemmer, 800 East Nash
  • Dunn, Noah, tobacco worker, 800 East Nash
  • Dunn, Richard, Rev., 800 East Nash
  • Dunston, Allen, helper, 806 South Lodge
  • Dunston, Caroline, laundress, 800 South Lodge
  • Dunston, Charles, tobacco worker, 800 South Lodge
  • Dunston, Evelyn, tobacco worker, 800 South Lodge
  • Dupre, Nancy, tobacco worker, 106 South Vick
  • Dupre, Wiley, tobacco worker, 106 South Vick
  • Dupree, David, painter, 416 Walnut Alley
  • Dupree, Edward, laborer, 518 Church
  • Durdin, William, laborer, Mercer near Five Points Settlement

902 Faison Street.

This house is located just outside the East Wilson Historic District.

In 1918, Sankey Jones registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 25 July 1879; lived on Faison Street; worked as a laborer for Hackney Wagon; and his nearest relative was Ida Jones.

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones Sanky (c; Ida J) hlpr h 902 Faison

Ida Jones died 2 December 1928 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 2 March 1886 in Wilson County to Patrick Faison and Ella Blunt; was married to Sankey Jones; and worked as a laundress.

Sankey Jones’ house was advertised for sheriff’s sale in 1929, but it appears that he was able to redeem it.

Wilson Daily Times, 29 August 1929.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 902 Faison, owned and valued at $1000, Sanky Jones, 40, wagon factory laborer; wife Amecia, 38, cook; children James, 16, and Ray M., 13; and lodger Frank Sharp, 48, gardener.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones Sanky (c; Armesia) h 902 Faison

Sankey Jones died 6 February 1942 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 26 January 1884 in Wilson County to Henry Jones and Elizabeth Darring; was married to Armecia Jones, age 44; worked as a laborer for Hackney Wagon Company; and was buried in Rountree cemetery.

Armecia Jones died 8 September 1959 at the Green Street crossing of the A.C.L. railroad in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 10 July 1893 in Louisburg, N.C., to Mary Malone; was widowed; and resided at 902 Faison Street. Raye Frazier of Brooklyn was informant.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 September 1959.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

The division of Henderson Brantley’s land.

Though he died in 1916, Henderson Brantley‘s land in Taylors township was not divided per the terms of his will until 1946. His son Charlie Brantley and Mollie Brantley Howard received equal shares.

——

In the 1850 census of Nash County, North Carolina: Betty Brantley, 50, and her children Kimbrel, 25, Henderson, 14, and Guilford B. Brantley, 12, all described as mulatto.

In the 1910 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: on Howards Path, Henderson Brantley, 70, widower; daughter Bettie, 23; and cousin Dock Howard, 38.

On 9 April 1915, Hence Brantley executed a will in Wilson County. Under its terms, his daughter Bettie was to receive 22 1/2 acres, including the home place; son Charley Brantley was to receive an adjoining 22 1/2 acres; and daughter Molie Hourd was to receive his remaining land. His money was to be split evenly among the children. Brantley named his “trusty friend” Grover T. Lamm executor, and Lamm and Dock Howard were witnesses.

Henderson Brantley died 2 December 1916 in Taylor township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 80 years old; was a widower; was a retired farmer; was born in Nash County to Bettie Brantley. Informant was Charles Brantley.

Bettie Brantley died 8 December 1919 in Taylor township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 40 years old; single; and was born in Wilson County to Henderson Brantley and Mollie Boone. Charlie Brantley was informant.

In the 1940 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Charlie Brankley, 63; his sister Mollie Howard, 53; and lodger Earnest Howard, 30, a farm laborer.

Charlie Brantley died 8 January 1948 in Taylor township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was single; was born 1 August 1874 in Nash County to Hence Brantley and Mollie Boone; was a farmer; and was buried in Brantley cemetery. Mollie Brantley was informant.

Mollie Howard Brown died 1 January 1974 in Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 15 April 1878 in Wilson County to Henderson Brantley and Mollie Boone; was a widow; and was buried in Howard cemetery. Earnest Howard was informant.

Plat book 2, page 218, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson County Courthouse.

1012 Atlantic Street.

The eighty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; gambrel-front house with two-bay facade; aluminum-sided.”

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: George Arthur H (c; Minnie B) pastor Calvary Presbyterian Ch h 1012 Atlantic.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1012 Atlantic Street carpenter/bricklayer Arthur J. George, wife Minnie, sons Arthur, Henry H., and Bryant George, lodger Rebacer Ramsy, and niece Willie L. George.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1012 Atlantic Avenue, rented for $12/month, tobacco factory janitor Bud Bryant, 52; wife Nancy, 48; nieces Louise, 17, Nannie, 15, Mary, 12, and Carleen Reid, 11; and son Frederick Reid, 34, divorced.

In 1940, Frederick Reid registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 September 1905 in Wilson; resided at 1012 Atlantic; his contact was mother Nancy Bryant, 1012 Atlantic; and he worked for W.B. Corbett, Waterworks Road, Wilson.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bryant Bud (c; Nancy) lab 1012 Atlantic Av.

Nancy Bryant died 14 January 1945 at her home at 1012 Atlantic Street. Per her death certificate, she was 53 years old; born in Wayne County to Zion and Eliza Reid; and was married to Rev. Mathew B. Bryant, age 56, who was informant.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

Old Ed.

Ed Dupree lived a colorful life.

On a Saturday night in February 1936, three white men — Offie Page, Floyd Page and Gwin Pullman — pulled up outside Dupree’s Railroad Street house, called him to the car and forced him in at gunpoint. Fighting off blows, Dupree dived through the rear window as the vehicle neared Stantonsburg Street. When the police caught up with the trio, they found a toy pistol and a pointing finger — Dupree, the men said, was the responsible for Pullman’s arrest for possession of five gallons of unlawful liquor.

Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 9.18.05 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 9.18.24 PM.png

Wilson Daily Times, 4 February 1936.

Almost three years later, Dupree was in court facing his fifth bootlegging charge in the last twelve months. Nettie Williams testified that Dupree had offered to pay her to take responsibility for the half-gallon of liquor police had found at his house. Police testified that they discovered alcohol poured into a bucket and stashed in “trap doors” in the outhouse and about the house. Ed Dupree’s daughter Mary testified that Nettie had brought the liquor in and dumped it when the cops arrived. The recorder — essentially, a magistrate — was not persuaded. He sentenced Dupree to six months “on the roads,” i.e. on a chain gang, and resurrected a six-month suspended sentence on top of that.

Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 9.11.21 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-10-10 at 9.11.43 PM.png

Wilson Daily Times, 17 January 1939.

——

In the 1930 census of Town of Wilson, Wilson township, Wilson County: at 420 South Lodge Street, rented for $20/month, bottling plant laborer Egar [sic] Dupree, 55; wife Bettie, 31; children Wilder, 11, Esther, 9, Mary E., 7, and Edgar Jr., 5; and roomer Cornelia Hicks, 22.

Per the 1930 edition of Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, Edw. Dupree was employed by Barnes-Harrell Company, bottlers of Coca-Cola. W. Offie Page was a clerk at P.L. Woodard & Company, an agricultural supply company. The directory also lists Floyd S. Page, a salesman with Wilson Auto Sales, and Floyd T. Page, a switchman. (At least twice — in 1939 and 1943 — the Daily Times printed notices that recent references to arrests of “Floyd Page” did not refer to car salesman Floyd. I suspect that switchman Floyd was the party involved in the kidnapping of Ed Dupree.)

813 East Vance Street.

The eightieth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

IMG_2915.JPG

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1913; 1 story; saddle-bag house with hip-roofed porch.”

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Johnson Alberta (c; cook) h 813 Vance

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Johnson Alberta (c; wid Clif) dom h 813 Vance

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2017.

Where we worked: 1922 — C.

City directories offer fine-grained looks at a city’s residents at short intervals. The 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., directory reveals the types of work available to African-Americans during the booming tobacco era. This post is the third in an alphabetical series listing all “colored” directory entries for whom an occupation was listed. The address is the resident’s home, unless a business address is noted.

  • Calvary Presbyterian Church, Green at corner of Pender
  • Cannon, Charles, carpenter, 724 East Green
  • Cannon, Lavalier, domestic, 724 East Green
  • Cannon, Mack D., barber, 505 East Nash, (home) 201 Pender
  • Cannon, Stattie, dressmaker, 724 East Green
  • Carroll, Dave, plasterer, 113 South East
  • Carroll, Lizzie, tobacco worker, 412 Spring Street Alley
  • Carroll, Mack, chauffeur, 412 Spring Street Alley
  • Carroll, William, gardener, 412 Spring Street Alley
  • Carter, Clarence, laborer, 418 East Green
  • Carter, Harry, drayman, East Nash extended
  • Carter, Isabella, domestic, 904 East Nash
  • Carter, Milford, cook, 905 Viola
  • Carter, Robert, bicycle mechanic – C.H. Darden & Sons, 904 East Nash
  • Carvit, Henrietta, cook, 610 South Spring
  • Chambers, Peter, laborer, 314 South Lodge
  • Chambers, Zeb, laborer, 200 West Lee
  • Chambliss, John, tobacco worker, 137 Narroway
  • Cherry, Henry, bellman, 411 East Green
  • Chestnut, Ben, tobacco worker, 304 Spring Street Alley
  • Chick, Cleveland C., barber – W.S. Hines, 311 Pender
  • Chiney, Patience, cook, 109 West Gold
  • Christ Disciples Church, 707 South Spring, Rev. Bryant Kornegy pastor
  • Citizens Garage, East Nash Road extended, Joseph Williams proprietor
  • Clark, Ada, domestic, 805 Wiggins
  • Clark, Bettie, domestic, 606 East Green
  • Clark, Flora R., student, 706 East Nash
  • Clark, John H., carrier – Post Office, 706 East Nash
  • Clark, Letha, dressmaker, 606 East Green
  • Clark, Meta, tobacco worker, 805 Wiggins
  • Clark, Mittie, cook, 607 West Vance
  • Clark, Samuel, laborer, 810 Robinson [Robeson]
  • Clark, Sarah, laundress, 606 East Green
  • Clayton, Freeman, farmer, 515 Smith
  • Clements, James, tobacco worker, 905 Robinson
  • Clements, Mollie, laundress, 905 Robinson
  • Cloffer, George, helper, 310 South Lodge
  • Cobb, Arthur, laborer, 703 East Nash
  • Cobb, Bettie, laundress, 1010 Robinson
  • Cobb, General C., cook – Leonard C. Lewis, 1010 Robinson
  • Cobb, Isaac, tobacco worker, 617 East Nash
  • Cobb, Sherman, cook, 1010 Robinson
  • Cobb, William, laborer, 416 South Lodge
  • Cobb, Willie, domestic, 617 East Nash
  • Cofield, Julia, tobacco worker, 410 South Lodge
  • Coleman, Lucy, laundress, 611 East Nash
  • Coleman, Samuel, tobacco worker, 611 East Nash
  • Coley, Alonzo, plasterer, 915 Washington Avenue
  • Coley, Eva J., teacher, 401 North Vick
  • Coley, George, cook, 118 Ashe
  • Coley, Henry, barber, 401 North Vick
  • Coley, Jasper, bricklayer, 401 North Vick
  • Coley, Laura V., teacher, 401 North Vick
  • Coley, Maggie, domestic, 611 Gay
  • Coley, Rosa, laundress, 708 Walnut
  • Coley, Rufus, janitor, 1010 Atlanta [Atlantic]
  • Coley, Victoria, domestic, 604 East Green
  • Collins, Allie, domestic, 707 Suggs
  • Collins, Esther, domestic, 212 South Reid
  • Collins, Peter, porter, 707 Suggs
  • Collins, Sun, drayman, 301 Stantonsburg Road
  • Commercial Bank of Wilson, 426 East Nash, S.H. Vick president, J.D. Reid active vice-president, H.S. Stanback cashier, phone 982

  • Connor, Flossie, domestic, 407 East Green
  • Cook, Alfred, laborer, 615 Stantonsburg Road
  • Cook, Cora, domestic, 605 Moore
  • Cooke, Jerre L., clerk, R.M.S., 512 Hadley
  • Cooper, Church, driver, 507 Hadley
  • Cooper, George, tobacco worker, 419 South Goldsboro
  • Cooper, Hazel, domestic, 407 South Railroad
  • Cooper, Millard, laborer, 523 South Spring
  • Cooper, Savannah, cook, 609 Spruce
  • Cooper, William, gasfitter, 108 South Reid
  • Coppedge, George W., plasterer, 200 South Vick
  • Coppedge, Mittie, domestic, 200 South Vick
  • Coppridge, Jane, domestic, 113 Manchester
  • Council, Alberta, domestic, 710 Suggs
  • Council, James, farmer, 710 Suggs
  • Covington, Alice, domestic, 531 Smith
  • Covington, Mary, laundress, 707 East Green
  • Covington, Ruth, clerk, 724 East Green
  • Coward, Bryant P., Rev., pastor St John A.M.E. [Zion] Church, 119 Pender
  • Cox, Harrison, tobacco worker, 305 North East
  • Cox, Lula, domestic, 111 South Reid
  • Cox, William, laborer, 116 [sic] Viola
  • Crank, Annie, tobacco worker, 519 Stemmery
  • Crawford, Clarence A., bricklayer, 616 East Green
  • Crawford, Daniel, watchman, 605 South Spring
  • Crawford, Josephine, domestic, 206 North Reid
  • Crawford, Theodore, student, 605 South Spring
  • Crawford, W. Clyde, president – Wilson Building & Construction Company, 206 North Reid
  • Crawford, Wilhelmina, teacher, 605 South Spring
  • Crawford, Willard, student, 605 South Spring
  • Creech, Haywood, tobacco worker, 416 East Green
  • Crum, Julia, laundress, 209 Stantonsburg Road
  • Currie, Nancy, cook, 304 East South

Notes:

  • Who were W. Clyde and Josephine Crawford, and what was the Wilson Building Construction Company? The family is not found in a Wilson census record.

Page 27, Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory 1922-23.

Studio shots, no. 96: Amanda Edwards Mitchell.

Screen Shot 2018-10-07 at 6.42.32 PM.png

Amanda Edwards Mitchell (1869-ca. 1905).

In the 1880 census of Rocky Mount township, Nash County: farmer Rob Edwards, 40; wife Sallie, 38; children Waitie, 20, Mary E., 19, Lucy, 17, Georgeanna, 15, Jerryhill, 12, Mandy, 11, Morning, 9, Charity, 7, Cora, 5, Maddieann, 2, and Buckhill, 4 months; and grandson Aaron, 1.

On 24 December 1889, James Mitchell and Amanda Edwards, both 20, applied for a marriage license in Nash County, North Carolina.

In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer James G. Mitchell, 31; wife Armanda, 30; children Chestar, 9, Regenia, 8, Henretta, 6, William R., 4, and Dewry, 2; and widowed mother Roset Mitchell, 50.

Amanda Edwards Mitchell died between 1900 and 1910. In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer James G. Mitchell, 38; mother Rosa, 58; and children Kester R., 14, Cynthia, 14, Robert L., 12, Jimmie D., 10, and Lelia B., 8.

Cinderilla Cotton died 27 December 1928 in Toisnot township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 35 years old; was born in Wilson County to James G. Mitchell of Wilson County and Armanda Edwards of Nash County; was married to Sidney Cotton; and was buried at William Chapel Church cemetery.

Robert Lee Mitchell died 18 October 1875 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 17 April 1896 to James Gray Mitchell and Amanda Edwards; was a widower; was a farmer; and resided in Elm City.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user grannysmess.