Henderson

Studio shots, nos. 38 and 39: Hattie Henderson Ricks.

Shortly after World War II, Hattie Mae Henderson found work at Wilson Awning & Tent Company’s factory on South Douglas Street.

Hattie Factory 01

As recalled here, handling fabric and sewing the oversized tents was challenging work. The dresses and skirts women commonly wore in the 1940s were not suitable for maneuvering atop the long tables on which the tents were stitched, so Henderson and other female workers donned full-legged dungarees on the factory floor. These photos were taken in unnamed Wilson studios during this period.

Hattie Henderson in trousers

Photograph in the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks, now in the possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

Studio shots, no. 69: Dempsey L. Henderson.

A veteran of both World War II and the Korean War, Dempsey Lee Henderson received a three-star Pacific Theater Ribbon, American Theater Ribbon, Victory Medal, Purple Heart, and one-star Philippine Liberation Ribbon.

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Dempsey L. Henderson was born on or about 31 December 1927 in Wilson to Lena B. McNair and Jesse “Jack” Henderson.

In the 1940 census of Washington, District of Columbia: at 335 Elm Street, Lena Henderson, maid, 30; son Dempsey Henderson, 12; mother Mary McNary, 53; and lodger John Pendleton, 29, transfer merchant truck driver.

In 1943, Henderson registered for the World War II draft in Washington, D.C.

This 1944 muster roll shows that Henderson was aboard the U.S.S. Abner Read, a Fletcher-class destroyer, in September of that year.

Dempsey L. Henderson died 2003, and was buried at Quantico National Cemetery.

Photo of Dempsey Henderson in collection of Lisa Y. Henderson; Draft Registration Cards for District of Columbia, 1940-1947, digitized at www.fold3.com; Muster rolls of U.S. Navy ships, stations, and other naval activities, 1939-1949, digitized at www.fold3.com.

On this Veteran’s Day…

Family lore has it that Lucian Jacob Henderson attempted to join the Army at 15 or 16 as World War II was in full rage.  He was finally able to enlist on 28 October 1944, his 18th birthday. Though his home address was 1109 Queen Street, Wilson, he was working as a deckhand for the Norfolk & Washington Steamboat Company at the time and signed up at a draft office in Washington, D.C.

The following year, Henderson qualified as an infantry rifleman after spending four months in basic and advanced training at the Infantry Replacement Training Center in Fort McClellan, Alabama.

Lucian J. Henderson, probably 1945-46. His shoulder patch bears the insignia of the Sixth United States Army, with whom he served occupation duty in Japan at the end of 1945.

Lucian J. Henderson, at left.

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; photographs from the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks.

Snaps, no. 15: Hattie Mae Henderson.

Hattie Mae Henderson (also known as Hattie Mae Jacobs), Wilson, 1928.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Elmo [Elba] Street, Jessie Jacobs, 60; wife Sara, 42; and daughters [adopted great-nieces] Mamie, 12, and Hattie May, 10.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 303 Elba Street, Sarah Jacobs, 49, and daughter [adopted great-niece] Hattie Jacobs, 19.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 Queen Street, Hattie Henderson, 29, and children Lucian, 13, Jesse, 11, Redrick, 5, and Hattie M., 3.

Hattie Mae Henderson Ricks died 15 January 2001 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Photograph in the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks, now in the possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

 

Studio shots, no. 42: Jesse Adam Henderson.

Jesse A. Henderson, early 1940s.

Jesse A. Henderson, mid-1940s.

The photograph above of Jesse A. Henderson was taken in the same studio, and probably during the same visit, as that of his good buddy Thomas L. Peacock.

Jesse A. Henderson, mid-1940s.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 Queen Street, Hattie Henderson, 29, and children Lucian, 13, Jesse, 11, Redrick, 5, and Hattie M., 3.

Jesse Adam Henderson died 5 August 2005 in Washington, D.C.

Photos from the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks.

Snaps, no. 8: Alice Henderson Mabin.

alice-henderson-queen-st

Alice Henderson Mabin at 711 East Vance Street with sister Doris Henderson Ward, early 1940s.

“Mrs. Alice “Zeke” Henderson Mabin, 97, daughter of the late Jesse “Jack” and Pauline Artis Henderson, was born in Wilson, North Carolina on January 22, 1920. She entered into eternal rest on Saturday, July 29, 2017 at the Wilson House, an assisted living facility in Wilson. Her funeral will be held 3 p.m. Saturday, August 5, at Stevens Funeral Home. Burial will be 2 p.m. Monday at National Cemetery, Hampton, Virginia.

“Alice received her nickname from her older sister, Bessie, whose pet name for the new baby was “Zekie Poo.” Alice was reared in Wilson County, NC where she was educated in the public-school systems. One of her first jobs as was an elevator operator in one of Wilson’s few office buildings. Later, she was an employee at Carnegie Institution for Science in Baltimore, Maryland, where she retired after many years as an operating room technician.

“In the 1950s, Alice relocated to Norfolk, Virginia, where she met and was united in Holy Matrimony to the late Joseph “Joe” Willie Mabin on August 15, 1957. Shortly after, they moved to Baltimore, Maryland, and bought a home at 3509 Mulberry Street where they spent several happy years until he passed on December 13, 1968.

“Alice was a member of the Church of Christ in Baltimore where she taught Sunday School and was a faithful and dedicated member until her health declined.

“On July 19, 2012, Alice moved back to Wilson to the care of her nephew Louis Hall Jr. and his wife Jean.

“Alice was a beautiful, cheerful, and fun-loving person who was full of life. Her smile was infectious and could light up a room. She made everyone around her happy. No matter whether it was her positive attitude, a funny story or a big smile, she was such a delight to be around. She was a loving wife, sister, aunt, cousin, and friend who lived a long and healthy life. She will be missed by all who had the pleasure of knowing her.

“In addition to her parents and husband, she was preceded in death by her siblings, brothers Archie, Jesse Jr., and Bobby Henderson, and sisters Bessie Henderson Smith, Joyce Henderson Boyd, and Mildred Henderson Hall.

“Alice leaves to cherish her fond memories a sister, Mrs. Doris Henderson Ward of Wilson, and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends.”

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In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 318 Pender Street, Jack Henderson, truck driver, 38; wife Pauline, 31, and children Bessie, 12, Alic, 10, Joice, 8, Mildred, 6, and Archy, 4, listed in the household of mother-in-law Alic Artis, 49, private cook, paying $18/month rent.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 309 Pender Street, Alice Artis, 56; daughter Pauline Henderson, 39, household servant; granddaughters Bessie L., 23, hotel elevator girl, Alice, 20, household servant, Joyce, 18, household servant, Mildred, 16, and Doris, 10; and grandson Robert, 4.

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Rest in Peace, Cousin Zeke.

Photograph in collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks, now in possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

A classroom.

Classroom

This photograph depicts a classroom at Colored Graded School (later known as the Sallie Barbour School) on what was then Stantonsburg Street. The children appear to represent several grades, but only two have been identified. Roderick Taylor Jr. (born 1928) is at center, in front of the hand-drawn North Carolina state flag. Lucian J. Henderson (1926-2003) is third from right, behind the model house. The occasion and the photographer are unknown.

Photograph from the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks, now in the possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

Pauline Artis Henderson.

Pauline Artis Henderson

Polly Artis Henderson, probably 1920s.

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In the 1900 census of Ingrams, Johnston County: widower farmer Archie Artis, 78; daughters Bathanie, 32, and Alice E., 22; and granddaughters Victoria, 13, Effie, 10, and Pollie, 1.

On 3 December 1914, Solomon Ward applied for a marriage license for Jesse Henderson of Wilson, 21, son of Jesse Jacobs and Sarah Jacobs, and Pauline Artis of Wilson, 18, daughter of Alice Artis.  On the same day, Fred M. Davis, Baptist minister, performed the ceremony at his residence before Mary Barnes, Annie Hines, and Willie Cromartie, all of Wilson.  [Jesse and Sarah Henderson Jacobs were, in fact, Jesse’s foster parents.]

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 217 Pender Street, Jesse Henderson, 25, truck driver for woodyard; wife Pauline, 20; daughter Bessie, 2; and mother-in-law Alice Artis, 37, cook.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 318 Pender Street, Jack Henderson, truck driver, 38; wife Pauline, 31, and children Bessie, 12, Alic, 10, Joice, 8, Mildred, 6, and Archy, 4, listed in the household of mother-in-law Alic Artis, 49, private cook, paying $18/month rent.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 309 Pender Street, Alice Artis, 56; daughter Pauline Henderson, 39, household servant; granddaughters Bessie L., 23, hotel elevator girl; Alice, 20, household servant; Joyce, 18, household servant; Mildred, 16; and Doris, 10; and grandson Robert, 4.

Pauline Artis Henderson died in 1950.

Photograph courtesy of J.A. Edmunds.