Henderson

Snaps, no. 15: Hattie Mae Henderson.

Hattie Mae Henderson (also known as Hattie Mae Jacobs), Wilson, 1928.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Elmo [Elba] Street, Jessie Jacobs, 60; wife Sara, 42; and daughters [adopted great-nieces] Mamie, 12, and Hattie May, 10.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 303 Elba Street, Sarah Jacobs, 49, and daughter [adopted great-niece] Hattie Jacobs, 19.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 Queen Street, Hattie Henderson, 29, and children Lucian, 13, Jesse, 11, Redrick, 5, and Hattie M., 3.

Hattie Mae Henderson Ricks died 15 January 2001 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Photograph in the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks, now in the possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

 

Studio shots, no. 14: Jesse Adam Henderson.

Jesse A. Henderson, early 1940s.

Jesse A. Henderson, mid-1940s.

The photograph above of Jesse A. Henderson was taken in the same studio, and probably during the same visit, as that of his good buddy Thomas L. Peacock.

Jesse A. Henderson, mid-1940s.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 Queen Street, Hattie Henderson, 29, and children Lucian, 13, Jesse, 11, Redrick, 5, and Hattie M., 3.

Jesse Adam Henderson died 5 August 2005 in Washington, D.C.

Photos from the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks.

Snaps, no. 8: Alice Henderson Mabin.

alice-henderson-queen-st

Alice Henderson Mabin at 711 East Vance Street with sister Doris Henderson Ward, early 1940s.

“Mrs. Alice “Zeke” Henderson Mabin, 97, daughter of the late Jesse “Jack” and Pauline Artis Henderson, was born in Wilson, North Carolina on January 22, 1920. She entered into eternal rest on Saturday, July 29, 2017 at the Wilson House, an assisted living facility in Wilson. Her funeral will be held 3 p.m. Saturday, August 5, at Stevens Funeral Home. Burial will be 2 p.m. Monday at National Cemetery, Hampton, Virginia.

“Alice received her nickname from her older sister, Bessie, whose pet name for the new baby was “Zekie Poo.” Alice was reared in Wilson County, NC where she was educated in the public-school systems. One of her first jobs as was an elevator operator in one of Wilson’s few office buildings. Later, she was an employee at Carnegie Institution for Science in Baltimore, Maryland, where she retired after many years as an operating room technician.

“In the 1950s, Alice relocated to Norfolk, Virginia, where she met and was united in Holy Matrimony to the late Joseph “Joe” Willie Mabin on August 15, 1957. Shortly after, they moved to Baltimore, Maryland, and bought a home at 3509 Mulberry Street where they spent several happy years until he passed on December 13, 1968.

“Alice was a member of the Church of Christ in Baltimore where she taught Sunday School and was a faithful and dedicated member until her health declined.

“On July 19, 2012, Alice moved back to Wilson to the care of her nephew Louis Hall Jr. and his wife Jean.

“Alice was a beautiful, cheerful, and fun-loving person who was full of life. Her smile was infectious and could light up a room. She made everyone around her happy. No matter whether it was her positive attitude, a funny story or a big smile, she was such a delight to be around. She was a loving wife, sister, aunt, cousin, and friend who lived a long and healthy life. She will be missed by all who had the pleasure of knowing her.

“In addition to her parents and husband, she was preceded in death by her siblings, brothers Archie, Jesse Jr., and Bobby Henderson, and sisters Bessie Henderson Smith, Joyce Henderson Boyd, and Mildred Henderson Hall.

“Alice leaves to cherish her fond memories a sister, Mrs. Doris Henderson Ward of Wilson, and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends.”

——

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 308 Pender Street, Jack Henderson, truck driver, 38; wife Pauline, 31, and children Bessie, 12, Alic, 10, Joice, 8, Mildred, 6, and Archy, 4, listed in the household of mother-in-law Alic Artis, 49, private cook, paying $18/month rent.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 309 Pender Street, Alice Artis, 56; daughter Pauline Henderson, 39, household servant; granddaughters Bessie L., 23, hotel elevator girl, Alice, 20, household servant, Joyce, 18, household servant, Mildred, 16, and Doris, 10; and grandson Robert, 4.

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Rest in Peace, Cousin Zeke.

Photograph in collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks, now in possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

A classroom.

Classroom

This photograph depicts a classroom at Colored Graded School (later known as the Sallie Barbour School) on what was then Stantonsburg Street. The children appear to represent several grades, but only two have been identified. Roderick Taylor Jr. (born 1928) is at center, in front of the hand-drawn North Carolina state flag. Lucian J. Henderson (1926-2003) is third from right, behind the model house. The occasion and the photographer are unknown.

Photograph from the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks, now in the possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

Pauline Artis Henderson.

Pauline Artis Henderson

Polly Henderson, probably 1920s.

In the 1900 census of Ingrams, Johnston County: widower farmer Archie Artis, 78; daughters Bathanie, 32, and Alice E., 22; and granddaughters Victoria, 13, Effie, 10, and Pollie, 1.

On 3 December 1914, Solomon Ward applied for a marriage license for Jesse Henderson of Wilson, 21, son of Jesse Jacobs and Sarah Jacobs, and Pauline Artis of Wilson, 18, daughter of Alice Artis.  On the same day, Fred M. Davis, Baptist minister, performed the ceremony at his residence before Mary Barnes, Annie Hines, and Willie Cromartie, all of Wilson.  [Jesse and Sarah Henderson Jacobs were, in fact, Jesse’s foster parents.]

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 217 Pender Street, Jesse Henderson, 25, truck driver for woodyard; wife Pauline, 20; daughter Bessie, 2; and mother-in-law Alice Artis, 37, cook.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 308 Pender Street, Jack Henderson, truck driver, 38; wife Pauline, 31, and children Bessie, 12, Alic, 10, Joice, 8, Mildred, 6, and Archy, 4, listed in the household of mother-in-law Alic Artis, 49, private cook, paying $18/month rent.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 309 Pender Street, Alice Artis, 56; daughter Pauline Henderson, 39, household servant; granddaughters Bessie L., 23, hotel elevator girl; Alice, 20, household servant; Joyce, 18, household servant; Mildred, 16; and Doris, 10; and grandson Robert, 4.

Pauline Artis Henderson died in 1950.

Photograph courtesy of J.A. Edmunds.

The awning and tent company.

12 12 1945

Wilson Daily Times, 10 April 1946.

Hattie Henderson Ricks recounted the difficult work of men and women employed in the sewing room of Wilson Awning & Tent Company:

“There was a fellow when I was working in the tent and awning company. He was one of the boys that worked there that pulled the tent, the thing we had, where was on the table. You know it was a great big table, big as this whole length of this house. And he was on there and to pull the table, when you were putting them flaps, somebody had to pull it around and [inaudible] sewing then you sit in the cubby holes, and the machine was up there. And I was at the bobbin, I had to thread the bobbin. And time I’d get around it and thread – oh it was a big place, it was all the way ‘round and like a horseshoe. The way the sewing machines were made. And then this thing was built up, but it was this material to lay on, and somebody had to be up on that thing to pull it through the machine ‘cause they couldn’t push it. They’d just push it a little bit out, and sewing’d go along, and it’d pile up, and they had to keep it carried through. And I’d thread the bobbins.

“The war [World War II], I think, was over, but they were making, it was Boy Scout tents, like for camping tents or whatever it was. And so when I went there I was pulling on the table where was back there.   I didn’t like that, so I said, well, it was a white girl was threading bobbins and so she was sick or something one day, and she didn’t come to work, so they let me. I said, “Let me thread the bobbins.” They said, “Well, somebody’ll have to thread ‘em,” said, “Go ‘head.” So I went there, didn’t know nothing ‘bout how to thread ten bobbins on one spindle.   So I looked at the thing, and a girl had to show me. So I got a hold of it, and it was those little round bobbins where you put on this long thing, you slide ‘em on there and you thread when you start off with the first one, then it goes around it, jump right up and push the other one up there and jump up and … But you had to cut that thread on the bobbin, and so that’s where I messed up when I first got there. When I would take the razor blade and cut in there, I cut two or three pieces and every time they’d always be having thread breaking, the thread … and it was oil, and you couldn’t take it with your hands and break it. So then I have a shoebox – not a shoebox, but a cigarette box, cigar box, and that thing was full of bobbins. And I had to take it around, all the way ‘round and come up the other side, and back to place. Any time I [inaudible] piling up again, go ‘round again. “I’m out of thread! Bring me some thread!” I said, ‘Lord have mercy, these folks is there ‘fore I can get this thing together.’ And then it come to me how to work it. And, didn’t have so much oil in it. If you let the oil stay in there too long, it’d make it slick, and it didn’t half cut. But you had to put it in oil because it would break. Them little … And then it got the thing messed all up under there, and the white guy had to come there and take his pocket knife and reach down there and cut it out and take some scissors with the end and try to cut the place out. So then the white girl where was working there, she didn’t like it either. She didn’t like to thread bobbins, she’d rather pull the tent, had to have probably four, five of them girls up there pulling tents and that thing was just as big as that whole – it was big as this house. Bigger than this thing here, the table that it was on. And it [inaudible]. But I still stayed on there until the place closed up.

“And after I left there, that’s when I went over to the hospital [then the Eastern North Carolina Sanatorium, which opened in 1943 for the treatment of tuberculosis patients, now Longleaf Neuro-Medical Treatment Center] and worked. I was going over there one day and so, Lizzie – I’ll never forget what was her name – she said she was going over there to see if she could get a job. And I said, well, told her, “Come by for me,” said, “We’ll go over there.” And both of us went over there. They hired me and didn’t hire her. So I worked there ‘til I come up here to Philadelphia.”

——

Wilson Awning & Tent was located at 105 South Douglas Street during Hattie Henderson Ricks’ employment. The company closed this location and moved to Highway 301 South in 1948.

Interview of Hattie Henderson Ricks by Lisa Y. Henderson, all rights reserved.

Better furniture.

This tag, shown front and back and dated November 1933, was found among personal papers of Hattie Henderson Ricks, who lived in Wilson from 1911 until 1958. Most likely, her adoptive mother (and great-aunt) Sarah Henderson Jacobs Silver purchased a mattress, box spring, stove and other items for their home at 303 Elba Street. ($87.50 is about $1650 in 2016 currency.)