Births Deaths Marriages

The Harts’ resting place.

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A photograph does not do justice to these unique matching headstones in Rest Haven cemetery. The inset is etched black glass. Tempie Ann Hart‘s shows a regularity that suggests it was machine-made. Ben Hart‘s, however, with its pointed-tail 9’s and serifed 7’s, bears the unmistakable imprint of craftsman Clarence B. Best. Though the insets have cracked, their lettering still darkly gleams in sunlight.

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In the 1870 census of Walnut Creek township, Edgecombe County: farmer Wiley Hart, 47; wife Chaney, 33; and children Susan, 13, James, 12, Lucius, 11 (described as “idiotic”), Wiley, 5, and Benjamin, 3.

In the 1880 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer Willie Hart, 57; wife Chaney, 43; children Susan, 24, James, 23, Willie, 15, Ben, 13, Epsy, 8, and Tildy, 6; and nephew Willie Killebrew, 15. Willie and Chaney reported suffering from dysentery.

In the 1880 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Stephen T. Jones, 25; wife Fortune, 22; and daughters Susan, 4, and Tempy A., 2.

Ben Hart, 31, son of Wiley Hart and Chaney Hart, married Tempy Joyner, 20, daughter of Forten Joyner, on 6 June 1900 in Toisnot township, Wilson County.

In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farm laborer Benjamin Hart, 32; wife Tempy, 25; children Hattie, 5, and Grover, 2; grandchildren [niece and nephews] Edwin, 17, George, 12, and Chaney, 11; and grandmother [mother] Chaney Hart, 65.

In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Wells Daws Avenue, Benjamin Heart, 43; wife Tempy, 33; children John L., 8, Willie B., 6, Dicy A., 5, Mattie, 3, and George, 1; wife’s children Hattie, 13, and Grover Johnson, 10; nephew Dallis Locus, 11; and mother Chanie Heart, 73.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Wilson-Tarboro Road, farmer Ben Hardt, 50; wife Tempy, 45; children John L., 18, Willie, 16, Dicie, 14, Mattie, 12, George, 10, Mary, 8, and Effie, 4. Next door, Grover Hart, 21, wife Mammie, 21, and son William, 1.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Ben Hart, 63; wife Tempie, 51; and children George, 21, Effie, 15, and [grandson] Ben Jr., 7.

In the 1940 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Ben Hart, 70; wife Tempie, 62; nephew Aaron Hinnant, 18; son-in-law Ernest Parker, 23; daughter Effie, 24; and granddaughter Elouise, 6.

Tempie A. Hart died 9 July 1940 in Wilson township. Per her death certificate, she was 57 years old; was born in Wilson County to Steve Jones and Forneighny Jones; and was married to Ben Hart.

Ben Hart died 7 November 1951 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 20 March 1881 in Edgecombe County to Wiley Hart; was a widower; resided at 1200 Washington Street, Wilson. Informant was Rev. J.L. Hart, 1200 Washington Street.

Willie Brown Hart died 2 April 1956 in Portsmouth, Virginia. Per his death certificate, he was born 3 January 1906 in North Carolina to Ben Hart and Tempie Ann Jones; was married; and worked as a janitor at City Treading Plant. Informant was George Hart, 104 North Reid Street.

Grover Lee Hart died 1 November 1958 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 3 August 1898 in Wilson County to Ben Hart Sr. and Tempie Ann Jones; was engaged in farming; lived in Elm City; and was married to Mamie Hart.

Hattie Pitt died 12 June 1962 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 29 January 1897 in Wilson County to Ben Hart and Tempie A. Jones; she was a widow; and she resided at 1306 Washington Street. Mrs. Festee Cotton, 1306 Washington, was informant.

John L. Hart died 6 February 1963 at Mercy Hospital. Per his death certificate, he was born 28 January 1901 in Wilson County to Benjamin Hart and Temie Ann Jones; was a minister; lived at 1200 Washington Street; and was married to Elouise Hart.

George Hart died 30 September 1971 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 6 February 1911 to Ben Hart and Tempie Jones; worked as a cabdriver; resided at 104 North Reid, Wilson; and was married to Lutoria Hinnant Hart.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2018.

Artis’ Cafe padlocked.

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Wilson Daily Times, 13 February 1939.

  • June Scott Artis — A history of Stantonsburg gave the date of the cafe’s opening as 1947, which apparently was off by at least a decade. It remained in business into the 1960s.
  • Edgar Artis, June S. Artis’ son.
  • Walter Ward — The 6 February 1939 edition of the Wilson Daily Times reported that Ward pleaded guilty to manslaughter and received a 15 to 18-year sentence.
  • H.B. Swenson — H.B. Swinson died 28 January 1939. Per his death certificate, he was “murdered, knife wound of breast”; was born 18 April 1913 in Greene County to Allen Swinson and Henrietta Applewhite of Greene County; lived i Stantonsburg; and worked in farming.

The obituaries of Fannie G. Ellis and John Henry Moore.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 December 1949.

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In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Wiggins Mill Road, farmer Bryant Ellis, 40; wife Mary Jane, 39; and children Pinkey, 17, General, 15, Gusten, 13, Bryant, 11, Thomas, 9, Sonnie, 7, Ronnie, 5, Sylvester, 3, and Mary Jane, 10 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Bryant Ellis, 53; wife Mary, 50; and children Daisy Sarah Herring, 28, and Gustus, 24, Bryant Jr., 21, Thomas, 19, Sonie, 17, Visor 12,  Mary, 11, William, 9, and Minnie Ellis, 5; and grandchildren Lizzie, 2, and Carry Gray, 1.

On 27 May 1937, Thomas E. Ellis, 35, of Winston-Salem, son of Bryant and Mary Jane Ellis of Wilson, married Fannie Gilmer, 27, of Winston-Salem, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

In the 1940 census of Winston-Salem, Forsyth County: Lafayette Cook, 24, teacher; wife Beatrice, 25; and son Lafayette Cook Jr., 1; with lodgers Thomas Ellis, 35, insurance agent, and wife Fannie, 30, tobacco factory stemmer.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Ellis Thos E (c; Fannie F) mgr Winston Mut Life Ins Co h 616 E Green

In 1942, Thomas Elder Ellis registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 25 February 1902 in Wilson; resided at 302 North Vick Street, Wilson; received mail at Post Office Box 93, Wilson; his contact was Short Barnes, 616 East Green Street; and he worked for Winston Mutual Life Insurance Company at its branch office in Wilson.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Ellis Thos E (c; Fannie G) mgr Winston Mut Life Ins Co h 1307 Atlantic Av

Fannie Goosby Ellis died 3 December 1949 at Wilson County Sanatorium. Per her death certificate, she was born 5 November 1907 in Davie County, North Carolina, to Horace Goosby and Mary Ann Lash; was married to Thomas Ellis; resided at 1307 East Atlantic Street; and was buried in Ellis Cemetery, Wilson County.

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In the 1912 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Moore Jno H shoemkr 526 E Nash h 137 Pender

In 1918, John Henry Moore registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 6 October 1884; resided on Atlantic Street, Wilson; was a self-employed shoe repairer with a shop at 513 East Nash; and his nearest relative was wife Armensie Moore.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Atlantic Street, James [sic] H. Moore, 36, laborer; wife Mary, 23; and children Robert, 6, Lenard, 3, and Carl, 1.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1113 Atlantic Street, owned and valued at $2000, shoe shop cobbler John H. Moore, 45; wife Annie, 31; and children Lena, 13, Carl, 11, John, 9, Anna G., 7, Odessia B., 3, and Ruth, 16 months.

In 1944, Ozzie Moore registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 1 September 1926 in Wilson; resided at 1113 Atlantic Street, Wilson; his contact was his father, J.H. Moore; and was employed by J.H. Moore at 517 East Nash Street, Wilson.

John Henry Moore died 4 December 1949 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 6 October 1894 in Pitt County, North Carolina, to Samuel Moore and Caroline Bullock; was married to Armecie Moore; resided at 1113 Atlantic Street; and operated a shoe shop.

John H. Moore’s headstone in Rest Haven cemetery. Both it and the family marker were engraved by Clarence B. Best.

The division of Kenyon Locus’ land.

Plat Book 2, Page 171, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson County Courthouse.

Kenyon Locus‘ estate included about 66 acres of land in Taylors township, Wilson County. His property was divided and platted in January 1942, a little over a year after his death. It was bordered on the north side by a road leading to the Wilson-Nashville Highway [N.C. Highway 58] and on the west by a road leading south to Wilson via Ellis Chapel. The property to his south was jointly owned by Charlie Brantley and Mollie Howard, heirs of Henderson Brantley. To the north was acreage owned by Will and Sylvia Howard (or Batchelor) Lucas. A house and several other buildings cluster on a small road that hooked across the northwest corner of the property.

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In the 1880 census of Jackson township, Nash County: John Locus, 30; wife Delpha, 30; and children Frank, 10, Dora, 8, Kenny, 5, Nancy, 4, and Samuel, 9 months.

In the 1900 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Johnnie Lucus, 43; wife Delpha, 51; children Kinion, 26, Nannie, 24, Edwin, 15, Sidney, 12, and Susan, 9; and grandsons Bunion, 5, and Martin L., 3.

In the 1910 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: on Howards Path, John Locust, 66; wife Delphia, 64; children Kinyan, 36, and Susie, 19; and grandchildren Bunyan, 15, Luther M., 13, and Roxie, 7 months.

In the 1920 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: John Locus, 77; wife Delphi, 65; son Kennie, 48; and grandchildren Roxie, 11, and Luther, 23.

In the 1940 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Kerney Locus, 67; wife Bell, 53; and lodger Frosty Pond, 33.

Kenney Locas died 10 December 1940 as the result of a terrible farming accident. Working in a field on his farm, he slipped off a stalk cutter and suffered a crushed leg and pelvis. He was taken to Mercy Hospital, where he was declared dead. Per Locus’ death certificate, he was 66 years old; was married to Isabella Locas, age 55; was born in Wilson County to John Locas of Wilson County and Delphia Taylor of Nash County; and worked as a farmer.

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The obituary of David Horne.

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Wilson Daily Times, 26 September 1980.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Park Avenue, gardener Abram Horne, 40; wife Ella, 33; and children Abram Jr., 16, David, 7, and Dazella, 4 months.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: David Horne, 29, living alone, fertilizer plant laborer.

David Horne died 20 September 1980 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 29 February 1912 in Wilson County to Abram Horne and Ella Mae Barnes; resided at 300 North Reid Street, Wilson; was married to Beatrice Batts Horne; and worked as a laborer.

Cemeteries, no. 22: John and Bettie Hinnant Jones family cemetery.

This small family cemetery is adjacent to the Sane Williams graveyard, described here.

The graves of John A. Jones and Bettie Hinnant Jones lie under two of the brick vault covers seen below.

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In the 1880 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Dempsy Powell, 52, farmer; wife Sallie, 46; daughter Susan A. Jones, 27, and her husband John A. Jones, 34; their children Thomas A., 13, Jessee B., 11, James A., 7, Celia C., 5, Sallie C., 4, and John A., 1; and W.D. Lucus, 21, laborer.

John A. Jones, 20, of Old Fields, son of John A. and Susan Jones, married Celia Williamson, 18, of Old Fields, daughter of Spencer and Senia Williamson, on 17 January 1898 at Jim Jones’.Witnesses included Thomas A. Jones.

In the 1900 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer General V. Hinnant, 38; wife Martha A., 35; and children Alice V., 13, Minnie A., 12, Ezekiel, 11, Bettie J., 9, William V., 4, Oscar, 2, and Herman, 2.

In the 1910 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer Vandorne Hinnant, 48; wife Betsy J., 46; and children Ezekial, 22, Bettie, 19, Willie, 13, Oscar, 12, Luther, 10, Regest W., 9, Roland, 8, Ralon, 6, Ollien, 4, and Roy E., 2.

J.A. Jones, 34, son of John A. and Susan Jones, of Old Fields, married Bettie Hinnant, 21, daughter of Vandorn and Janie Hinnant, of Springhill township, on 5 May 1912. Missionary Baptist minister William H. Mitchiner performed the ceremony at the Hinnant home.

In 1918, John Alce Jones registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he resided at R.F.D.#1, Sims; was born 25 January 1897; was a self-employed farmer; and Bettie Jones was his nearest relative.

In the 1920 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: on Jones Hill Road, farmer J.A. Jones, 42; wife Bettie, 28; and children Johnie W., 16, Grover, 7, Susie, 5, Maomie, 4, and Ruth, 1.

In the 1930 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: John A. Jones, 53, farmer wife Bettie J., 39; and children Grover L., 17, Sussie J., 15, Namie, 13, and Ruth, 11.

John Asley Jones died 21 April 1962 in Rocky Mount, Nash County. Per his death certificate, he was born 25 October 1878 in Wilson County to John Allen Jones and Susan Powell; was married to Betty Hinnant; was a retired farmer; and lived in Sims, Wilson County.

Bettye Hinnant Jones died 21 May 1866 in Enfield, Halifax County, North Carolina. Per her death certificate, she was born 2 February 1891 in Wilson County to Vandorn Hinnant and Martha Jane Horton; was widowed; and resided in Sims, Wilson County.

Photographs by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

 

The obituary of Louis Barnes.

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Wilson Daily Times, 17 September 1935.

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Gray Barnes, 64; wife Barney, 54; and children Lewis, 27, Nancy, 17, Caroline, 14, Gray, 13, and Spicey, 11.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Louis Barnes, 50; wife Jane, 40; and children Maggie, 17, Lillie, 16, Reese, 15, Oscar, 13, Hattie, 12, Grey, 10, Jimmy, 6, Wiley, 4, Henry, 3, Navis, 1, Charity, 7, and Mary Jane, 1 month.

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Wilson Road, farmer Lewis Barnes, 57; wife Jane, 48; and children Lucy, 26, Hattie, 21, Gray, 20, Chairaty, 18, James L., 16, Henry, 14, Navis, 13, Mary Jane, 11, Joe, 9, Needham, 7, and David, 2.

In the 1920 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Wilson Road, farmer Lewis Barnes, 70; wife Jane, 58; and children Maggie Bullock, 35, and Lee, 25, Lossie, 18, J. Mary, 17, Joseph, 16, William, 15, and David, 13; and grandchildren Charity, 5, and Oscar Bullock, 3.

Jane Barnes died on 28 March 1924 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 65 years old; married to Lewis Barnes; and was born in Johnston County to Charity Cruddup.

In the 1930 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: widower farmer Lewis Barnes, 73; children Charity, 27, Needam, 25, and David, 23; grandson Rosco Barnes, 15; daughter-in-law Hannah Bullock, 17; and boarder William Richardson, 22.

Louis Barnes died 16 September 1935 in Gardners township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 82 years old; was the widower of Jane Barnes and son of Grey and Bonnie Barnes; was born in Wilson County; and was a farmer. Lucille Batts was informant.

Lucy Batts died 13 March 1954 in O’Neals township, Johnston County. Per her death certificate, she was born 18 January 1890 in Wilson County to Louis Barnes and Jane Harris and was married. Valentine Batts was informant.

 

 

Goffney bound over.

The Times published a blow-by-blow of the preliminary hearing Wilson mayor E.F. Killette held over the homicide of Blanche Williams. Joe Goffney entered a plea of not guilty, but Killette found sufficient evidence to hold him over for trial in the Superior Court.

Joe Brodie testified first. Goffney, who was married, came with Williams to the house in which she lives. Brodie was in the back room when the shot rang out. Williams staggered out and fell to the floor. Goffney ran out, shouting that he had not known the gun was loaded. Brodie sent for Dr. Mitchner, who declared Williams dead.

Nellie Williams testified that Goffney and Blanche Williams had entered the house laughing and talking. She was in the next room lacing her shoe when she heard the gun fire and heard Goffney say, “I didn’t say a word — or I will kill all of you.” Nellie Williams ran out of the house with one shoe on.

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Clifton Johnson also testified that Goffney and B. Williams entered the house talking and laughing. Johnson said he saw the gun on the center table when he entered and did not know to whom it belonged. (Neither Brodie nor N. Williams corroborated this, saying that as far as they knew there had been no gun in the house.) Goffney picked up the gun and said “let me see it.” Johnson’s back was turned to them when Goffney fired. Goffney did not say anything “out of the way” to Williams. The remark about “killing them all” came after the shooting. Goffney told them to get a doctor, then left the house. He gave Johnson the gun, who threw it away.

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“Colored physician” William Mitchner testified that he found Blanche Williams on the porch dead. The bullet had struck her in the chin, breaking her lower jaw, and exited the back of her neck, possibly fracturing her spine. In his opinion, Goffney was standing directly in front of Williams when he fired, and the bullet’s trajectory was slightly downward.

Clifton Johnson was recalled to testify that he and Goffney were on the same side of the table, and he was behind Williams.

Goffney testified that Clarence Johnson carried concealed weapons. [Is this Clifton? Or a different man?] Clarence had placed a magazine and .32 cartridges on the table.

Officer Weathersbee testified that he and Officer Sikes asked Johnson for the gun, and Johnson said he had thrown it in the pea patch. Johnson admitted the gun was his, and it had not been found.

Clarence Johnson denied telling Weathersbee the gun was his. He did not own a gun. Goffney was mistaken when he said Johnson had pulled the gun from his pocket and that there had been a magazine on the table. Johnson works at an express office and borrowed a holster from a fellow employee. He did not borrow a gun. The holster is in a bureau drawer at his house. Mayor Killette interjected that the holster had been found between the bed[frame] and mattress in Johnson’s room. Johnson could not explain why he borrowed a holster.

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Joe Lee denied seeing Goffney take a pistol from Johnson’s pocket. Apparently, Nettie Williams did, too. Johnson’s mother testified that he did not own a gun and had not brought one to the house the night of the killing.

Johnson’s lawyer F.D. Swindell argued that in the excitement of the moment, it was perfectly natural for Johnson to throw away the gun Goffney gave him. The only evidence that the gun was his was Goffney’s testimony, which was inherently biased.

The mayor was satisfied that Johnson had borrowed the pistol and bound him over as a material witness and for carrying a concealed weapon. He fined Johnson $75 and set his bond for $500. Goffney was sent to jail to await trial.

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Wilson Times, 30 September 1921.

  • Joe Goffney — Was Joe Goffney convicted? I have not found a follow-up, but the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory lists: Goffney Joseph tobwkr [tobacco worker] h 206 Manchester. This is likely the Joseph Goffney listed in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer Lemon Barnes, 51; wife Dollie Ann, 51; children Ida, 26, Lemon Jr., 20, Mattie, 17, Charlie, 15, and Howard, 12; stepsons Cornelius Neal, 11, Paul Goffney, 17, and Joseph Goffney, 15; and grandson Sylvester Barnes, 6.
  • Blanche Williams — Per her death certificate, Blanch Williams was 24 years old; single; resided on Stantonsburg Street; and worked as a common laborer. She was born in Wayne County, North Carolina, to Wash Smith and Laura Williams, and Selena Craig of Goldsboro was informant. Her cause of death: “revolver wound of head (probably accidental).” [A 26 September 1921 Times article about the shooting reported that Williams was married and lived in Goldsboro, but had come to Wilson to work briefly in domestic service. She had planned to return to Goldsboro the week she was shot. She had been “going with” Goffney while in Wilson, and jealousy was believed to be at the root of the violence. Unnamed witnesses heard Goffney tell Williams, “If you go with that man, I will kill you,” as they walked to Joe Lee’s home. As Williams walked out of the house to return home, Goffney called her back in and shot her.]

  • Joe Brodie — possibly Josephine Brodie listed in the 1922 city directory as a student living at 303 Mercer Street.
  • Nellie Williams
  • Clifton/Clarence Johnson — perhaps the Clifton Johnson listed in the 1920 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory as a porter living at 118 Ashe Street.
  • Dr. Mitchner — William A. Mitchner.
  • Joe Lee — possibly Joseph Lee listed in the 1920 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory as a factory hand living at 115 Manchester Street. [However, the 26 September Times article identified Joe Lee and Joe Brodie as the same person, a woman.]
  • F.D. Swindell — lawyer Fred D. Swindell.
  • W.A. Finch — lawyer William Atlas Finch.
  • Mayor Killette — mayor Edwin F. Killette Sr.
  • Officer Weathersbee
  • Officer Sikes

Golden wedding … and more.

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Wilson Daily Times, 1 December 1953.

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Wilson Daily Times, 23 November 1963.

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B.H. Edwards, 23, of Nash County, married Lucy Kearney, 17, of Wilson, on 9 November 1903 in Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony in the presence of J.J. Murfree, J.H. Pulley and W.L. Hardy.

Lucy K. Edwards died 26 March 1966 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 8 November 1886 in Franklin County, North Carolina, to Anna Williams; resided in Elm City, Wilson County; was married to Buck H. Edwards; and was buried in William Chapel cemetery.

Buck H. Edwards died 12 December 1967 in Elm City, Taylors township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 6 February 1891 in Nash County to Robert Edwards and Sallie Parker; was married to Bettie M. Edwards; was a minister; and was buried in William Chapel cemetery. Informant was Mrs. Mae Guzman, 1214 Queen Street, Wilson.