Wainwright Avenue

1020 East Hines Street.

The one hundred sixty-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1922; 1 1/2 stories; William Barnes house; early local bungalow with gable roof and engaged porch; shingled dormer; Barnes was a laborer, chauffeur, and builder.”

The address of this house was 1020 Wainwright Avenue prior to the extension of Hines Street in the early 1970s.

In the 1928 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Barnes Wm (c; Julia) lab h 1018 [sic] Wainwright av [In the householders’ section of the directory, the house number is listed at 1020.]

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Barnes Wm (c; Julia) lab h 1020 Wainwright av

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1020 Wainwright, owned and valued at $900, William Barnes, 46, lumber mill laborer; wife Julia, 42; and children Evelyn, 13, Mary B., 11, and William Jr., 8.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1020 [Wainwright], William Barnes, 58, cotton mill engineer; wife Julia, 55; children Evylene, 25, beautician in beauty parlor, Mary, 19, and William, 17, shoeshine boy in shoe shop; and adopted daughter Nebraska, 11.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Wm (c) lab h 1020 S Wainwright Av

On 27 April 1946, Clarence Hoskins, 22, of Wilson, son of Lonnie Hoskins and Gertrude Hines [sic] Hoskins, married Nebraska Barnes, 18, of 1020 Wainwright Avenue, Wilson, daughter of William Barnes and Julia Fields Barnes, in Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister H. Hoskins performed the ceremony in the presence of Azzel F. Hall, Joseph Zeigler Jr., and Agnes M. Hoskins.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Wm M (c; Julia) mech Sou Oil Co h 1020 S Wainwright Av; also, Barnes Wm M jr (c) student h 1020 Wainwright

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, April 2022.

1200 East Hines Street.

The one hundred thirty-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; bungalow with engaged gable-roofed [sic; it is shed-roofed] porch and heavy square porch posts on brick piers; asbestos veneer.”

The address of this house was 1200 Wainwright Avenue prior to the extension of Hines Street in the early 1970s.

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In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Haskins Damp (c; Sudie B) driver 1200 Wainwright av; Haskins Estelle (c) dom 1200 Wainwright; Haskins Hester (c) h 1200 Wainwright

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Haskins Hester (c) h 1200 Wainwright

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1200 Wainwright, valued at $1700, Coca-Cola Plant laborer Damp Haskins, 24; wife Sudie B., 21; children Damp Jr., 2, and Hellen, 6 months; mother Hester, 72; brother Joseph, 18; sister Martha Pitt, 52, servant; and nephew Jim R. Haskins, 10.

In 1940, Johnnie Hagans registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 26 June 1917 in Wilson; was unemployed; lived at 1200 Wainwright Street; and his contact was mother Mamie Hagans

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hagan Jas (c) lab 1200 S Wainwright av;  Hagan Mamie (c) farmer 1200 S Wainwright av; Hagan Sarah (c) tob wkr 1200 Wainwright av

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Price Louis (c; Nellie) farmer h 1200 S Wainwright av

Wilson Daily Times, 9 July 1948.

Louis Price died 23 August 1948 at his home at 1200 Wainwright Avenue, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 2 June 1903 in Harnett County, N.C., to Walter Price and Amy McNeil; and was buried in Smith Grove, Dunn, N.C.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 June 1962. 

[Personal sidenote: During my childhood, 1200 Wainwright was the home of William and Mable Tyson Foreman. My sister and I spent many happy hours playing with their three grandchildren, our “play cousins,” on their visits from Washington, D.C.]

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, November 2021. 

1010 Wainwright Avenue.

For reasons that are not clear to me, the 1000 block of Wainwright Avenue is not included in the  East Wilson Historic District, though this house and others on the block date to the 1920s and ’30s.  

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In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1010 Wainwright was vacant.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1010 Wainwright, rented for $15/month, Grover Jackson, 48, odd jobs laborer, born in Alabama; wife Hattie, 30, servant; stepdaughters Bertha Reese, 15, Sarah E. Reese, 12, and Billie Roberson, 9, and stepson Samuel Farmer, 9.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jackson Grover (c; Hattie) lab h 1010 Wainwright Av

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1010 Wainwright, owned and valued at $750, Calvin Swinson, 41; wife Alice, 35; and children Jessie, 15, Calvin, 12, Earlean, 11, Horace, 9, Soisetta, 6, and Charles, 2.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Swinson Calvin (c; Alice; 6) orderly h 1010 Wainwright Av

In 1942, Calvin Swinson registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 6 June 1898 in Greene County, N.C.; lived at 1010 Wainwright; his contact was [father-in-law] Wesley Jones, 901 Stantonsburg Street, Wilson; and he worked for Woodard-Herring Hospital.

In 1945, Calvin Swinson Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 11 June 1927 in Wilson; lived at 1010 Wainwright; his contact was Calvin Swinson; and he was a student at Darden High School.

Wilson Daily Times, 15 September 1948.

Wilson Daily Times, 9 August 1950.

Snaps, no. 84: Rev. Hattie Daniels’ home.

Dr. Judy Wellington Rashid shared these photos she took during a visit with Rev. Hattie Daniels‘ daughter Deborah R. Daniels in 1981, two years after Rev. Daniels’ death.

This remarkable framed portrait depicts Rev. Daniels as a young preacher, circa late 1920s or early 1930s. [In my years of searching for and collecting early 20th-century African-American photographic portraits, I have never seen one like this. I fervently hope that this one is safe somewhere with the Daniels family.]

Below, Rev. Daniels’ house at 908 Wainwright Avenue. Just visible behind it, at left, is the building that housed her Golden Rule kindergarten. It has been demolished. Rev. Daniels’ house is now empty and boarded up, and the boxwood hedge, ornamental tree, and small front garden have been ripped out.

The view from Rev. Daniels’ porch toward a line of endways (“shotgun”) houses on the south end of Vick Street. The houses were originally on South East Street. In the early 1970s, when Wiggins Street was eliminated for the extension of Hines Street across newly built Renfro Bridge, East was cut off from Hines by a barricade, and the continuation of Vick across Hines was slightly rerouted. Only three of the endways remain — on the Hines end of the block. All have been renovated within the last twenty or so years.

Many thanks to Dr. Judy W. Rashid.

904, 906 and 908 Wainwright Street.

The one hundred twenty-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

908, 906 and 904 Wainwright St.

  • 904 Wainwright

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; 2 stories; Miracle Tabernacle Church; traditional gable-end form and pointed-arch vent in gables rare example in district that retains weatherboarded facade.” [The building since has been clad in vinyl siding. It does not appear to be in current use.]

In the 1928 and 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, at 904 Wainwright: The Church of God (c).

Wilson Daily Times, 29 November 1941.

  • 906 Wainwright

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; Hattie Daniels rental house: shotgun with engaged porch and late turned porch posts; built for tenants by Daniels family, who lived at #908.”

No house is found at this address in the 1930 or 1940 censuses or in the city directories issued in the 1940s.

  • 908 Wainwright

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; Hattie Daniels house; bungalow with three-pile plan and gable-end form with hip-roofed porch; asphalt veneer; Daniels preached at the Miracle Tabernacle Church and began a day-care center behind her home in 1949; husband, Cleveland, was a [railroad] fireman.”

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hardy Cornelius (c; Carrie) hlpr h 908 Wainwright Av.

In the 1930 city directory: Hardy Cornelious (c; Carrie) mill hd h 908 Wainwright Av

Wilson Daily Times, 12 January 1931.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 908 Wainwright, owned and valued at $1500, Cleveland Daniel, 40, fireman at city plant; wife Hattie, 38, saleswoman; and father-in-law Mack Owens, 60, farm laborer. All were born in Georgia.

In 1942, Cleveland Daniels registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 15 April 1897 in Warrengton, Georgia; lived at 908 Wainwright Avenue, Wilson; his contact was Mrs. Dora Godwin, 910 Wainwright; and he worked for the City Light Plant.

George Cleveland Daniels died at his home at 908 Wainwright on 19 August 1949. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 April 1897 in Warren County, Georgia, to Peter and Jane Daniels; was a fireman; was married to Hattie Daniels; was a veteran of World War I; and was buried in Rountree Cemetery.

Hattie Owens Daniels died 25 April 1979 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 4 July 1900 in Chester, Georgia, to Mack Owens and Mary Gardner; was a widow; resided at 908 Wainwright Avenue, Wilson; and was a minister and kindergarten teacher. Daughter Deborah Daniels was informant.

Property of the late Austin Neal.

Four years after his death in 1949, L.M. Phelps prepared a survey of barber Austin N. Neal‘s four lots and three houses on Wainwright Avenue.

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The 1922 Sanborn fire insurance map of Wilson gives a wider view of the area and shows the larger house on the corner and one of the shotgun houses.

Freeman Street and Wainwright Avenue no longer intersect. This stretch of Wainwright is now Hines Street, and Freeman Street is blocked off.

The Neal house is still standing, now numbered 1218 Hines Street S.E. In 1988, when the nomination form for the National Register of Historic Places was submitted, all three houses (and a newer fourth) were accounted for: #1212, built circa 1930, 1 story, shotgun with turned-post porch; #1214, built circa 1930 [per the Sunburn map, earlier], 1 story, shotgun with turned-post porch and Masonite veneer; and #1218, built circa 1913, 1 story, Queen Anne cottage with double-pile, hip-roofed form, front-facing wing, and turned-post porch.”

Here’s a side view of the house, showing the blocked end of Freeman Street.

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In the 1900 census of Freeman township, Franklin County: widower Austin Neal, 30, and children Bryant, 3, and Bertha, 1, plus brother Abram, 17, and sisters Tabitha, 19, and Bessie, 21.

In the 1912 Wilson city directory, Austin Neal was listed as a barber at 409 East Nash. His home address was “Wainwright av for Freeman.”

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 105 Wainwright, widowed barber Austin Neal, 42, with children Bryant, 21, also a barber, Daisy, 16, Annie, 13, Samuel, 7, and Ruth, 5.

In the 1930 census, Wilson, Wilson County: at 1214 Wainright Avenue, barber Austin Neal, 61, wife Lizzie, 38, servant for a private family, and son Samuel, 18, a hotel bell hop.

Austin N. Neal died 14 February 1949 at Mercy Hospital of terminal uremia. He was born 11 November 1878 in Franklinton, North Carolina, to Abron Neal and Louise Brodie. He was buried in Rountree cemetery. Mrs. Lizzie H. Neal was informant.

Plat map 1, box 114, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson; photos courtesy of Google Maps.

1110 Hines Street.

The one hundred-fifth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; bungalow with gabled roof and dormer; shingled gables; fine example of the side-gable bungalow in E. Wilson.” The house was originally 1110 Wainwright Avenue. County property tax records show that the house was built in 1940.

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In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Pridgen Jas H (c; Meta) gro 1218 E Nash h 1110 Wainwright Av

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Harrison Eli W (c; Rosa) Jones Constn Co h 1110 Wainwright Av

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2018.