Newspapers

Josephine Artis Sherrod.

j sherrod

Josephine Artis Sherrod (1887-1988).

Josephine Artis Sherrod, a sister of Columbus E. Artis and June S. Artis, was matriarch of a tight-knit family centered on two blocks of East Viola Street described within the family as Sherrod Village.

——

In the 1900 census of Nahunta township, Wayne County:  Adam Artice, 68, a widowed farmer,  with children Louetta, 18, Robert, 16, Columbus, 14, Josephfene, 13, Jun S., 10, Lillie B., 9, Henry B., 6, Annie, 3, Walter, 26, and William Artis, 24. [Josephine’s mother was Amanda Aldridge Artis, who died in 1899.]

On 16 April 1907, Solomon Sherard, 28, son of Dempsey and Harriett Sherard, married Josephine Artis, 20, daughter of Adam and Amanda Artis at A.T. Artis’ in Nahunta township, Wayne County. J.H.W. Sherard of Pikeville, J.B. Best of Saulston, and Louis Sherard of Pikeville were witnesses.

In the 1910 census of Nahunta township, Wayne County: Solomon Sherard with wife Josephene and children Allena and Jarva, plus cousin Walter Smith.

In the 1920 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Elm City Road, farmer Solomon Sherrod, 41; wife Josephine, 32; and children Alena, 11, Jarvis, 10; Doretta, 8; Dock, 6; B. Minnie, 4; and Solomon, 1.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Harpers Road, farmer Soloman Sheard, 50; wife Josephine, 42; and children Javis, 20, Doretta, 18, Linton O., 16, Minnie B., 13, Solomon, 11, Flora, 3, Bulah, 3, and Elmore, 1.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 802 Viola Street, Solomon Shearard, 60; wife Josephine, 52; and children Flora, 15, Beulah, 13, Elmer, 11, and Solomon, 21; plus “son’s wife” Mildred, 18, and grandson Ernest E., 8 months.

Solomon Shearard died 6 February 1948. Per his death certificate, he resided at 802 East Viola Street; was married to Josephine Shearard; and was born 21 October 1878 in Wayne County, to Dempsy Shearard and Harriett Hill, both of Wayne County.  Informant was Josephine Shearard, 802 East Viola.

41188

 Wilson Daily Times, 11 April 1988.

Killed in sawmill.

Fayville Obs 10 26 1921

Fayetteville Observer, 26 October 1921.

Probably, in the 1920 census of Stantonsburg, Wilson County: on Moyetown Road, tenant farmer Elijah Ward, 34; his wife Florance, 26; farm laborer Hillery Wootten, 26, servant; farm laborer Robert Speight, 35, servant; his brother James Ward, 19, and sister Sarah Ward, 16.

“Standing by your old ni**er, are you?”

b Woodard 1 31 1908

News & Observer (Raleigh), 31 January 1908.

This nasty bit of “news” is a sample of the gratuitous racism that permeated Josephus DanielsNews & Observer in the Jim Crow era. Daniels had grown up in and gotten his journalistic start in Wilson and undoubtedly knew all the involved parties well.

Benjamin Woodard, a notorious folk doctor in Wilson County, had been arrested on unclear charges (probably involving bootlegging liquor) and hauled into federal court in Raleigh. Several notable white Wilsonians showed up to serve as counsel and character witnesses, including brothers and law partners Frederick A. Woodard (a former United States Congressman) and Sidney A. Woodard (a state congressman). The Woodards were described as Ben Woodard’s former owners, though F.A. had been a child and S.A. an infant at war’s end. Ben’s owner, then, had been their father, Dr. Stephen Woodard of Black Creek, Wilson County. F.A. requested a nolle prosequi (“nol. pros.”), which is odd, as this is generally a motion made by a prosecutor who wishes to drop charges. The District Attorney here politely indicated his unwillingness to make such a request, but the judge cheerfully entered it anyway. Thus Dr. Ben benefitted from ties forged in slavery and earned an insulting article in the state’s newspaper of record.

602 East Green Street.

The twentieth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1935; 1 story; Isaac Shade house; brick-veneered Tudor Revival cottage; Shade, a druggist, contracted black builders Louis Thomas and John Barnes.”

——

On 29 November 1898, Isaac A. Shade, 23, of Buncombe County married Emma Green, 21, of Buncombe County in Buncombe County.

In the 1900 census of Asheville, Buncombe County: at 174 Haywood Street, Isacc Shade, 24, laborer; wife Emma, 29; and children John, 7 months; and mother Alice Shade, 40.

In the 1910 census of Asheville, Buncombe County: on Jordan Street, Isacc Shade, 34, physician at drugstore; wife Emma, 22; son John, 10, Alice, 8, and Kenneth, 3; and widowed roomer Ollie Burgin, 41.

New York Age, 31 July 1913.

Isaac Albert Shade registered for the World War I draft in Wilson on 12 September 1918. Per his draft card, he lived at 110 Pender Street, Wilson; was born 17 May 1876; was a self-employed druggist at 530 East Nash Street, Wilson; and wife Estella Shade was his nearest relative.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 535 Nash Street, Turner Stokes, 50, carpenter; wife Morah, 39; mother-in-law Martha Pitt, 83; and boarders Isac Shade, 44, drugstore manager; wife Estella, 38; and children Kenneth, 13, and Sarah, 9.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 602 Green Street, drugstore owner Dr. I.A. Shade, 63; wife Estelle, 54, city school teacher; niece Myrtle Lane, 23, county school teacher, and nephew George Lane, 21, drugstore clerk; and roomers Louisa [illegible], county school teacher, Vera Green, 18, housekeeper, and Catherine Ward, 20, county school teacher.

Isaac Albert Shade died 24 April 1953 at his home at 602 East Green. Per his death certificate, he was born 17 May 1875 in Morington [Morganton], North Carolina, to London Shade and Alice (last name unknown); was married; and was a pharmacist at a drugstore. Sarah Shade was informant.

Seventy-Second Annual Report of the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy (1953).

Photo of house by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2017; undated photo of store courtesy of Delores Thomas, reprinted from Wilson Daily Times, 22 February 2008.

Dr. Butterfield goes home.

Thirty years after he establish a dental practice in Wilson and became one of the early architects and builders of the town’s nascent civil rights strategy, the Bermuda Record published a glowing report of George K. Butterfield‘s return to his home country.

Bermuda Recorder, 10 August 1957.

[N.B.: Dr. Butterfield‘s son, shown peering at the camera in the photograph above, is George K. Butterfield, Jr., member of the United States House of Representatives.]

Who was U No Barnes?

In 1914, in a show of mutual support, Progressive Colored Citizens included a glowing write-up of H.G. Barnes on its front page, and the painter placed two ads in its three pages.

“H.G. Barnes, the sign painter, better known as ‘U No Barnes,’ is a good workman and has practically all of the white business of the town. He was trained in the trade in Cleveland, Ohio, although he is a native of this community. With careful attention to the details of his business, he has established himself as worthy. He also installs all kinds of electrical signs.”

Who was U No Barnes?

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: teamster Ed Pool, 54; wife Adeline, 44; and nephew Harvey Barnes, 15.

Harvey G. Barnes took out a large in the 1912-13 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory to promote his business. The directory noted that Barnes lived at 623 Darden Alley, and his House of Signs was at 107 South Goldsboro Street.

signs

On 28 June 1916, Harvey G. Barnes, 30, of Wilson, son of Jim and Harriet Barnes, both deceased, married Roslin Pitts, 21, of Guilford County, daughter of Morgan and Georgia Pitts of Spaulding County, Georgia, in Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina. The union merited a lengthy write-up in the New York Age. The wedding party included best man Camillus L. Darden and groomsman W.H. Jones of Wilson. Barnes and Pitts apparently met during the year that she taught at Wilson’s Colored Graded School.

Screen Shot 2017-04-24 at 8.10.46 PM

Screen Shot 2017-04-24 at 8.11.02 PM

ny age 6 29 1916

New York Age, 29 June 1916.

On 12 September 1918, Harvey Grey Barnes registered for the World War I draft in Washington, D.C. Per his registration card, he resided at 410 L Street, S.E.; was born 22 March 1886; worked as a painter for W.M. Spore, 35 M Street; was married to Rosalind B. Barnes; and was 5’4″ and slender with black hair and eyes.

In the 1920 census of Washington, D.C.: at 410 L Street, S.E., North Carolina-born Harvey Barnes, 33, and his Georgia-born wife Rosylind, 23. Barnes worked as a coach painter in a paint shop. [This house, located in the Navy Yard area, no longer stands.]

In the 1930 census of Washington, D.C.: at 1013 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Harvey G. Barnes, 40, painter in paint shop, and wife Rosaline, 32, seamstress. Barnes owned the house, which was valued at $2385. [This house no longer stands.]

Harvey Grey Barnes applied for a Social Security number in November 1936. He listed his parents as James and Harriette Barnes on his application.

In the 1940 census of Washington, D.C.: at 1013 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Harvey Barnes, 53, and sister Alice Willist, 48. Both were divorced. Barnes worked as a painter in an auto shop.

In 1942, Harvey Gray Barnes registered for the World War II draft in Washington, D.C. Per his registration card, he was 56 years old; was born 27 March 1886 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided at 1013 New Jersey Avenue, N.W.; and worked at National Trailways Bus Garage, 66 Hanover Street, N.W. He was 5’4, 150 pounds, with light brown skin, gray eyes and gray hair, and his contact was Miss Alice K. Barnes, 300 W. Franklin Street, Richmond, Virginia.

Progressive citizens, pt. 3.

Sometime in 1914, the Wilson Times published a three-page insert highlighting the achievements of the town’s African-American community. “Wilson is fortunate in having a large proportion of sensible negroes,” the writer opined, and counted among the laudable such well-known citizens and institutions as Samuel H. VickJ.D. Reid; Dr. Frank S. HargraveCharlesCamillus and Arthur Darden; Levi JonesWilliam HinesHenry Tart; and H.G. Barnes; Wilson Hospital and Tubercular Home for Colored People; the Colored Graded School; First Baptist Church; Saint John A.M.E. Zion Church; C.H. Darden & Sons Undertakers; and Lincoln Benefit Society.

Here is page 3 of the insert:

141061 (1)_Page_3

  • Crockett & Aiken
  • Acme Sign Works — “Estimates and designs furnished. Up-to-date electric signs promptly. Gold, silver and brass letters. Satisfaction guaranteed. Glass, cloth, wood, brass, metal and wire. ‘Anything in signs.’ H.G. Barnes, proprietor. ‘U No Barnes.’ He does the work.”
  • The Sanitary Shop — William Hines’ “up-to-date barber shop.”
  • Levi H. Jones, the Barber — “Hot and cold baths. No long waits. Clean shaves and everything sanitary. None but up to date workmen employed. Look for revolving sign opposite Lumina. Old customers stick. Drop in and join the stickers.”
  • Henry Tart, the Reliable Transfer Man — “When you need the luggage wagon or a hack — call Henry Tart at either phone 437 or phone 40. You get personal attention and careful handling of baggage. Our wagons and hacks meet all trains at both depots and we transfer baggage promptly to either depot or home or hotel and do it right. Hand baggage cared for with personal attention and delivered at the depot promptly. Passengers transferring between trains will find our drivers courteous. They will take of your hand baggage as well as transfer your trunks.”