Military

T/5 Whitehead’s remains returned for burial.

Wilson Daily Times, 26 May 1948.

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In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on S.H. Crocker Farm Road, tenant farmer, John Whitehead, 37; wife Nellie, 36; children E.K., 16, William H., 13, Anna V.O., 7, Anna Nula, 5, and J.B., 4; and great-uncle[?] Josh Whitehead.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Highway 91, express laborer [no first name] Whitehead, 49; wife Ella, 45; and children Anna V., 17, Nora, 16, John, 14, and William, 24. All were born in Georgia except Ella [Nellie], who was born in North Carolina.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: widow Nellie Whitehead, 56; son J.B., 24, truck driver for a contractor; daughter Anna Hagans, 27, tobacco company stemmer; son-in-law Henry Hagans, 32, town garbage remover; and daughter Elnora Whitehead, 26.

John Baptist Whitehead registered for the World War II draft in Wilson in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 25 December 1915 in Chester, Georgia; lived at Route 4, Box 39, Wilson; worked for Imperial Tobacco, Barnes Street; and his contact was his mother, Nellie Whitehead.

Applications for military headstones, no. 3: Rountree Cemetery.

As here, the applications below were made for military headstones to be installed in “Rountree Cemetery,” i.e. Rountree, Odd Fellows, or Vick Cemeteries. Of these, only James F. Scott’s grave marker has been found. (Another is now in Rest Haven, presumably the result of an exhumation and reburial.) The number of missing military headstones provides scale to the total loss of monuments in these cemeteries. 

  • James Franklin Scott

The gravestones of James F. Scott and his father, the Rev. John H. Scott, have been located in Odd Fellows Cemetery. (Rev. Scott applied for his son’s gravestone.) However, they were found piled and stacked with more than a dozen other markers, and the location of the actual graves is not known.

Frank Scott’s headstone. Interestingly, the marker is engraved with after-market text — a birthdate and an epitaph, “Who is now with the Lord.” 

  • Larry Barnes

Howard M. Fitts applied for the marker on Barnes’ behalf, as he did for many veterans.

  • Marcellus Lassiter

Marcellus Lassiter died 4 July 1947 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 12 April 1897 in Wilson County to John Lassiter and Isabell Gear; worked as a laborer; was a World War I veteran; was the widower of Mamie Lassiter; and was buried in Rountree cemetery. Informant was Hardy Lassiter of Baltimore, Maryland.

  • Hubert Romaine Mitchener

Hubert Mitchener’s gravestone now stands in Rest Haven cemetery.

  • Sam Nash

Sam Nash registered for the World War I draft in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 20 February 1890 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 1069 West Lexington Street, Baltimore; and worked as a laborer for B. & O. Railroad.

Minnie Nash of Baltimore submitted the application and requested that the headstone be shipped to Rosa Battle, 913 Washington Street, Wilson.

  • John W. Pitts

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 904 East Vance Street, John W. Pitts, carpenter, 53, born in South Carolina; wife Penina, 52, hotel maid; and son Junius, 20, farm laborer.

  • Nathan Austin

Nathan Austin died 22 July 1948 at a Veterans Hospital in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born in 1893 in Wilson County to Marshall Ingram and Louise Ingram Austin; was a widower; lived at 610 Taylor Street, Wilson; and was unemployed.

  • Robert E. Ashford

[This is not the Robert Edward Ashford born 23 November 1918 in Wilson, who was white.]

Robert Edward Ashford registered for the World War II draft in 1942 in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 23 July 1923 in Wilson; lived at 614 East Green Street, Wilson; his contact was mother Rosa Ashford; and he worked at the Marine Base in Jacksonville, N.C.

Rosa L. Ashford submitted the application.

  • Fred Hyman

Fred Hyman registered for the World War I draft in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 15 September 1887 in Tarboro, North Carolina; lived at 1323 South Markoe Street, Philadelphia; was a farmer for “Dougherty” in Haddonfield, New Jersey; and was married.

Fred Hyman died 23 August 1947 at a Veterans Hospital in Kecoughtan, Virginia. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 September 1888 in Tarboro; was separated from Magnolia Hyman; lived at 1233 South 47th Street, Philadelphia. His body was shipped to Wilson, N.C., to the care of C.H. Darden & Sons Undertakers.

Sam Hyman, 816 Mercy [Mercer] Street, Wilson, submitted the application.

  • John Henry Jackson

John H. Jackson died 7 April 1946 at the Veterans Hospital in Asheville, N.C. Per his death certificate, he was born 27 September 1872 in Surry County, N.C., to Tom Jackson; was married to Ida Mae Jackson; worked as a laborer; lived at 1201 East Washington Street; and was a veteran of the Spanish American War.

  • Henry Hines

Henry Hines died 11 March 1937 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 16 October 1892 in Wilson County to Mary Hines; was married to Lela Hines; lived at 808 Suggs Street; and was a day laborer for Farmers Oil Mill. 

  • Will Dixon

Will Dixon registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County in 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Farmville, North Carolina; lived on Stantonsburg Street, Wilson; was a laborer for W.L. Russell Box Company, Wilson; and was single.

Lenora Dixon applied for his headstone.

U.S. Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1970, http://www.ancestry.com.

Gen. Austin has ties to Wilson.

On 22 January 2021, the United States Senate confirmed Gen. (Ret.) Lloyd Austin as President Joe Biden as Secretary of Defense. The Wilson Times noted that Gen. Austin had ties to Wilson through his wife Charlene D. Austin and quoted Congressman G.K. Butterfield Jr.‘s remarks about his close friendship with her parents. Mrs. Austin’s father was Maryland Lee “M.L.” or “Tank” Banner, and her stepmother was Margaret Reid Banner. M.L. Banner was a Concord, N.C., native who moved to Wilson in the late 1950s to work at Reid Street Community Center. Margaret Reid Banner was a Wilson native, a descendant of the Wayne County Reid family whose Wilson branches included veterinarian Elijah L. Reid, principal and banker J.D. Reid, farmer Henry S. Reid, barber Willie G. Reid, and carpenters John R. Reid and John B. Reid. After many years in Pennsylvania, M.L. and Margaret Banner returned to Wilson in the 1980s, where both were deeply involved in community service for the rest of their lives.

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In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 614 Vick Street, laborer Oscar Reid, 26; wife Nora, 20; and daughter Thelma, 2. 

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1007 Washington Street, dry cleaner Oscar Reid, 41; wife Nora, 39, laundress; and children James O., 20, Cecil, 18, Percell, 16, Leotis, 14, Margarett, 7, Evangeline, 4, Eugene, 3, and Lettie Romaine, 2 months.

Margaret Reid graduated Darden High School in the Class of 1949.

From the The Trojan (1949), the Darden High School yearbook.

Darden’s veterans club.

World War II interrupted high school for many veterans, and they returned to earn their diplomas at war’s end. The Veterans Accelerated Club took this photo standing on the front steps of Darden High School.

The Trojan (1948), the yearbook of C.H. Darden High School.

The veteran-students’ instructors were John E. Dixon, Cora M. Washington, Mamie E. Whitehead, and Frissell W. Jones. The veteran-students: Walter Roberts, Paul L. Stevens, Henry Tune Jr., Ernest Edwards, Robert L. Murphy, Jesse B. Barnes, Jimmy L. Woodard, George W. Hines, Bennie Atkinson, Carlton Baker, Leo M. Bowens, Wilbert Currie, Frank Durham, Nelson T. Farmer, Nathaniel Ferguson, Henry Green, Jimmie Hines, Cle Arthur Jones, Nevalon Mitchell, Jesse Reynolds, Willie Townsend, Leon Williams, and Daniel Wright.

Men ordered to report, no. 5.

On 27 April 1918, the Wilson County Draft Board inducted these 26 African-American men into military service and ordered them sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, for basic training.

41550_1821100522_1158-00199

  • William Dorsey Shaw registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 21 August 1894 in Wake County, N.C.; resided 209 Hackney Street, Wilson; was a hostler for the Town of Wilson; and was married. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • William H. Billbry registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 8 January 1892 in Tarboro, N.C.; resided on Goldsboro Street, Wilson (crossed through and “New Bern, N.C.” entered); was a laborer for M. Popkin, Wilson; and had a wife and one child under twelve. He was tall and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Jessie Oliver registered for the draft on [5 June 1917.] Per his registration card, he was born in 24 December 1890 in Waynesboro, Georgia; resided in Black Creek, Wilson County; was a laborer for M.B. Aycock, Black Creek; and was single. He was of medium height and medium height, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Wade Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 in Black Creek, Wilson; resided in Wilson; was a self-employed farmer in Black Creek; and was single. He was of medium height and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • McKinley Justice registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 15 March 1896 in Edgecombe County, N.C.; resided on Route 1, Elm City; was a farmer for Frank Williams, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and slender, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Winsor Darden registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in September 1895 in Wilson County; resided in Wilson; was a self-employed farmer in Wilson County; and was single. He was of medium height and stout, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Walter Applewhite registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 8 February 1896 in Saratoga, N.C.; resided near Walstonburg, Wilson; was a laborer at a sawmill for R.R. Shackleford; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Nathan Dunnican registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1892 in Wilson, N.C.; resided in Wilson County, N.C.; was a farmer for S.J. Watson, Route 2, Wilson; and was single. He was short and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Albert Howard registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born about 1896 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided in Wilson, N.C.; was a self-employed farmer; and was single. He was short and of medium build, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X. [See Albert Howard in uniform here.]
  • Junius Lucas registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 18 July 1890 in Nash County, N.C.; resided in Wilson, N.C.; was a self-employed farmer; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Roy Evans registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 17 September 1895 in Nash County, N.C.; resided at 404 East Green Street, Wilson; was a butler for Jonus Oettinger, Wilson; was single; and had an injured back. He was tall and slender, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Fred Woodard registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1893 in Black Creek, N.C.; resided in Stantonsburg, N.C.; was a farmer forFred Washington; and was single. He was of medium height and slender, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Matthew Whitehurst registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born October 1889 in Martin County, N.C.; resided on Route 1, Elm City, N.C.; was a farmer for George A. Barnes near Elm City; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Edd Taylor registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born August 1896 in Elm City, N.C.; resided in Elm City, N.C.; was a farmer for Miles Pierce, Elm City; and was single. He was of medium height and build, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Orlando Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in August 1891 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided on Route 6, Wilson, N.C.; was a farmer for Sallie Graves, Stantonsburg; and was single. He was of medium height and build, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Jim Woodard registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 8 April 1890 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided in Elm City, N.C.; was a farmer; and was single. He was short and of medium build with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Sam Bunn registered for the draft on 27 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born July 1895 in Elm City, N.C.; resided in Elm City, N.C.; was a farm laborer for father Amos Bunn; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark blue eyes and black hair, that was slightly balding. He signed his card with an X.
  • James Thomas Revell registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 9 July 1893 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided on Route 4, Kenly, N.C.; was a self-employed farmer on Route 1, Lucama; and was single. He was tall and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Charlie Jones registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 20 August 1893 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided in Wilson County, N.C.; was a farmer for J.S Jones, Sims, N.C.; and was single. He was medium height, with dark eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Larry Clay registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 15 May 1895 in Oxford, N.C.; resided in Black Creek, N.C.; was a farm laborer for John Clay, Black Creek; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Two African-American men named William Thomas registered for the draft on 5 June 1917 in Wilson County. One was born about 1896 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided in Elm City, N.C.; was a farmer for E.R. Brinkley, Toisnot township; and was single. He was of medium height and build, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card “Will Thomas.” The second was born in 1895 in Augusta, Georgia; resided in Neverson, N.C.; worked as a laborer at a rock quarry for Harris Granite Company; and had a wife and two children. He was tall and of medium build and had black eyes and hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Robert Lee Mitchell registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 17 April 1896 in Elm City, N.C.; resided in Elm City, N.C.; was a farmer for J.G. Mitchell, Toisnot township; and was single. He was tall and slender, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • James Johnson registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 10 June 1895 in Kenly, N.C.; resided in Wilson, N.C.; was a self-employed farmer in Black Creek township; and was single. He was tall and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with his full name.
  • Several African-American men named Frank Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. The man inducted here was most likely one of two. The first was born 2 April 1895 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided in Wilson County, N.C.; was a farmhand for Drew Barnes, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and build, with dark eyes and dark hair. He signed his card with his full name. The second was born 25 August 1892 in Wilson County, N.C.; resided at 618 Lodge Street, Wilson; worked as a laborer at Farmers Oil Mill; and was single. He was of medium height and build, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.

Pvt. Ford killed in Christmas Eve car accident.

Wilson Daily Times, 28 December 1944.

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In the 1930 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farm laborer Rosco Ford, 48; wife Mary J., 37; and children Roxy L., 19, Iola, 17, Beatrice, 16, David, 14, Gestine, 13, John D., 11, Rosetta, 8, Virginia, 7, Horris C., 6, Ester J., 4, Mary L., 3, and Henry C., newborn.

In the 1940 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Roscoe Ford, 55; wife Mary, 48; children Beatrice, 25, David Lee, 24, J.D., 21, Rose Esther, 19, Virgina, 17, Harries, 15, Esther, 14, Mary, 13, Henry Clay, 10, and Willie Clinton, 9; and grandchildren John Beregs, 4, and and Odain McKennon, 1.

Horace Clee Ford registered for the World War II draft in June 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 28 January 1924 in Wilson County; lived on Route 1, Elm City; his contact was Roscoe G. Ford; and he worked for Walter Pridgen, Elm City.

Horace C. Ford died 24 December 1944 in rural Wilson township, Wilson County “3 mi N of Wilson.” Per his death certificate, he was born 24 January 1924 in Wilson County to Roscoe Ford and Mary Jane Simms; was single; was a soldier in the U.S. Army; and was buried in William Chapel cemetery.

Employee of the Robinson minstrel show.

In 1940, 29 year-old Langstard Miller registered for the Word War II draft in Wilson County. A native of Saint Louis, Missouri, Miller listed his address as 700 Stantonsburg Street, Wilson, the home of his friend Betsy Freeman. [Was this actually his permanent address or just a mailing address?] Miller listed his employer as Dr. C.S. Robinson Minstrel Show, based on Wilmington, North Carolina.

I have found very little on Miller and nothing else to link him to Wilson. However, on 11 July 1932, Gurnie Langstard Miller, 25, son of Joe Miller and Mattie Langstard, married Annie Amelia Evans, 21, daughter of John Evans and Ida Ash, on 11 July 1932 in Northampton County, Virginia.

Betsy Freeman was not living at 700 Stantonsburg Street when the census enumerator arrived in 1940. Rather, the censustaker found City of Wilson laborer George Freeman, 56; wife Effie, 45, tobacco factory laborer; son James, 26, tobacco factory laborer; and grandchildren Edward, 13, and Doris Evans, 11. The latter were the children of Bessie [sic] Freeman and James Evans, whom she had married in Wilson on 23 June 1925. [Was Betsy/Bessie Freeman also a minstrel show employee?]

Robinson’s Silver Minstrels were a white-owned tent show that featured African-American performers. The “Repertoire-Tent Shows” section of the 21 November 1942 issue of The Billboard magazine featured this short piece:

A few months later, in the 27 February 1943 Billboard, Robinson’s Silver Minstrels advertised for “colored performers and musicians, girl musicians OK; trumpets, saxophones, piano player, chorus girls, novelty acts.” The company promised the “highest salaries on road today” and a “long, sure season.” “All performers who have worked for me in past, write” to the show’s Clinton, N.C., address.

Where did they go?: Michigan World War II draft registrations, no. 3.

  • Southen Jones

In the 1940 census of Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan: on East Canfield, renting for $50/month, Southern Jones, 33, born in North Carolina, general work-W.P.A. project. He reported that he had been living in the same place in 1935.

Southen Jones registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 26 December 1906 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 1971 East Canfield, Detroit; his contact was friend Walter Dale; and he worked for W.P.A. He was described as Negro, 5’7″, 140 pounds, with brown eyes, black hair, dark brown skin, and a scar above his left eye.

  • Alphonza Jackson

Alphonza Jackson registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 9 June 1906 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 996 Ferry Avenue, Detroit; his contact was common-law wife Pearl Jackson; and he was unemployed. He was described as Negro, 5’9″, 184 pounds, with brown eyes, black hair, and dark skin.

  • Walter Dortch Hines

Walter Dortch Hines registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 17 July 1909 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 7068 Michigan, Detroit; his contact was mother Sara Elizabeth Hines, 617 East Green, Wilson; and he was a self-employed medical doctor. He was described as Negro, 5’10”, 154 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair, dark skin, and a scar on “dorsal aspect of left hand.”

  • Sead Abdulla (formerly Lonnie Bailey)

In the 1910 census of Oldfields township, Wilson County: farmer John D. Bailey, 42; wife Jeneva, 33; and children Rhoda, 15, Pearlie, 12, Mary L., 9, Lonnie, 8, Ora, 6, John T., 5, William H., 4, Melton P., 2, and Richard E., 1.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Saratoga Road, farm laborer Gilbert Vick, 29; wife Pearlie, 22; daughter Carrie Belle, 5; and brother-in-law Lonnie Bailey, 17.

Lonnie Bailey registered for the World War II draft in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 26 January 1902 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 1023 Illinois, Detroit; his contact was friend Geneva Bailey, 516 Church Street, Wilson; and he worked for Linwood Coal Company, Detroit. He was described as Negro, 5’9″, 165 pounds, with brown eyes, black hair, dark brown skin, and a scar on his left wrist. Via Probate Court, Bailey formally changed his name to Sead Abdulla on 1 June 1944. [His apparent conversion to Islam is the first I have seen for a Wilson County native, and it is reasonable to assume that he was a member of the Nation of Islam, founded in Detroit.]

Sead Abdullah died in February 1968 in Detroit.

  • Clifton Ray Hines

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Walter Hines, 50, wife Sarah, 48, and children Elizabeth, 21, Walter, 20, Carl W., 16, and Clifton R., 7.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 617 East Green, Walter S. Hines, 60; wife Sarah E., 58; son Carl W., 24, teacher; son’s wife Ruth, 23, teacher; and son Ray W. [sic], 17.

Clifton Ray Hines registered for the World War II draft in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 24 December 1922 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 7068 Michigan, Detroit [his brother Walter D. Hines’ home, see above]; his contact was mother Sarah Hines, 617 East Green Street, Wilson; and he worked for “Wayne Co. Rd. Comm. Traffic Census.” He was described as Negro, 5’7″, 140 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair, dark skin, and a scar on his left cheek.

Clifton Ray Hines died 11 September 1993 in Mayfield Heights, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. 

The obituary of Olander Williams, World War I veteran.

Wilson Daily Times, 28 April 1949.

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In the 1900 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Mollie Williams, 28, cook, and children Orlanda, 9, Nathaniel, 8, and Rosetta, 2.

In the 1910 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Mollie Williams, 37, private cook, and children Nathaniel, 18, odd jobs laborer; Roseta, 12, laborer; and Allander, 19, odd jobs laborer.

Aulander Williams registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County in 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in August 1891 in Wilson County; lived on Route 6, Wilson; was single; and farmed for Sallie Graves near Stantonsburg.

Orlander Williams, 26, of Stantonsburg, son of Alex Joyner and Mollie Williams, married Lula Evans, 24, of Wilson, daughter of Mingo and Martha Evans, on 5 August 1917 in Wilson County. Alexander Leake applied for the license, and Missionary Baptist minister H.H. Sanders performed the ceremony in the presence of Ernest May, Jesse Darden and Walter Haskins

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Aulander Williams, 28, cropper; wife Lula, 25; and son Aulander jr., 1.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Orlanda Williams, 34; wife Lula, 35; children Orlanda, 12, Nick, 8, Sarah, 7, Nora, 5, and Lula M., 2; and nephew Elmer, 14.

Lula Williams died 29 July 1947 at her home at 1016 Wainwright Street. Per her death certificate, she was born 2 January 1898 in Edgecombe County to Mingo Edwards and Martha Mercer; was married to Olanda Williams; and was a factory worker. She was buried in Rountree cemetery.

Olander Williams died 26 April 1949 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 18 August 1890 in Edgecombe County to Elex Johnson and Mollie Williams; lived at 520 Hadley Street; and was a laborer. Daisy Williams was informant.

Sending articles to Oteen Hospital.

Wilson Daily Times, 22 April 1921.

  • Angus McNeil — in the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 615 1/2 Viola, barber Angus McNeil, 27, and wife Maggie, 22. In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1202 Wainwright, barber Angus McNeil, 40; wife Maggie, 25; and daughter Agnes E., 6.
  • Oteen hospital — Oteen Veterans Administration Hospital.