East Green Street

A return to 624 East Green Street.

More than two years ago, I wrote here of the house at 624 East Green Street, built for Dr. Frank S. Hargrave. The house has been heavily and disfiguringly modified both inside — it’s been cut up into at least three apartments — and out, and is now unoccupied and sealed up. I recently trespassed just long enough to get a glimpse through the one unboarded window, which revealed a glimpse of the house’s former good looks.

This paneled stairwell originally led from the western edge of a large front room to the second floor. Now, there is an exterior door underneath the first flight (not visible from this angle) and, just out of the frame, a solid wall that separates the parts of the house entered through the front door from those entered through side doors.

Below, a straight-on view of Dr. Hargrave’s house. The original porch was enclosed at left and center, and the vertical siding on the second floor facade suggests alteration there as well.

Below, via Google Map, an aerial view of 624 East Green. The part of the house outlined in red is surely an add-on, as is likely the wing in yellow. The roof appears to be in remarkably good shape, given the condition of the rest of the house. The roof over the “porte cochere” (notwithstanding the National Historic Register description, it is really more of a portico) appears to be tin, which may be original. (Next door, the Vicks sprang for a slate roof.)

901 East Green Street.

The one-hundred-seventeenth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1930; 2 stories; two-bay, side-hall, gable front house.” Like 817 East Green, Walter S. Hines (and his heirs) owned and rented out this house. It was demolished in 2001.

In the 1928 and 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directories: Brooks Maggie (c) cook h 901 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 901 East Green, renting for $21/month, widow Maggie Brooks, 45, servant; Eszie M. Brooks, 26, nurse; roomer Roland Sudden, 24, factory laborer; Christene Brooks, 2; and roomers Robert Harvey, 26, glass cutter, and wife Mary, 22, both born in Georgia.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 901 East Green, rented for $15/month, barber Henry D. Coley, 44; wife Eva J., 39, teacher in public schools; and daughters Elizabeth P., 16, Grace L., 14, and Eva E., 10.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Coley David H (c; Eva) barber Walter S Hines h 901 E Green

Eva Janet Coley died 7 October 1941 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 9 June 1899 in Greene County to Jacob Speight and Ida Ward; was married to David H. Coley; was a teacher; and lived at 901 East Green Street.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, July 2019.

817 East Green Street.

The one-hundred-sixteenth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, the house that stood at 817 East Green Street was: “ca. 1913; 1 story; I-plan cottage with intact turned-post porch.”

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Winstead Arnold (c; Sybina) brklyr h 817 E Green

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius W (c; Ethel) barber Walter S Hines h 817 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 807 [sic] East Green, rented for $13/month, Junius Peacock, 30, barber, and wife Ethel, 34, maid at public school.

Junius Wesley Peacock died 28 April 1935 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 35 years old; was born in Wilson County to Junius Peacock and Nora Hoskins, both of Wilson County; lived at 817 East Green; and was a barber. Informant was Ethel Peacock.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 817 East Green, rented at $14/month, George Green 32, blacksmith at repair shop, born in South Carolina; wife Martha F., 26, hospital nurse; and mother-in-law Anetta Rosser, 63 (who had lived in Whitakers, Nash County, in 1935). Also, paying $5/month, Graham Bynum, 31, building carpenter, and wife Katherine, 29, hospital nurse.

In 1940, George Willie Green registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 15 October 1906 in Saint Matthew, South Carolina; lived at 817 East Green; his contact was wife Frances Rosser Green; and he worked for Bissett’s Repair Shop, 307 South Tarboro Street.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Green Geo W (c; Frances) blksmith Herbert W Bissett h 817 E Green

817 East Green was one of several dozen houses demolished on the order of Wilson City Council in 2002. Council also approved demolition of three other houses on East Green Street owned by the heirs of Walter S. Hines. (Walter Hines often rented his Green Street properties to barbers in his employ, like Junius Peacock.)

Wilson Daily Times, 21 June 2002.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, July 2019.

500 East Green Street.

The eighty-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1908; 1 story; John Barnes house; triple-A cottage with intact bracketed porch; Barnes was a brickmason.”

In the 1922, 1925, 1928 and 1930 city directories, John M. and Annie L. Barnes are listed at 500 East Green. Barnes’ occupation was given as plasterer in 1922 and bricklayer in 1925 and 1928.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 500 East Green, bricklayer John M. Barnes, 69, and wife Annie L., 61.

Annie Lee Barnes died 3 May 1943 at Mercy Hospital in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 February 1879 in Wilson to Charles Henry Darden of Greene County and Dianna Scarborough of Wilson County; was married to John M. Barnes; resided at 500 East Green; and taught at the Sallie Barbour School. John M. Barnes was informant.

John M. Barnes died 27 April 1958 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born in 1870 in Wayne County to Charles and Rebecca Pope Barnes; lived at 500 East Green; worked as a brickmason; was married to Cora Sherrod Barnes [daughter of Jack and Cassie Sherrod]; and was buried at Rest Haven. Thelma Byers was informant.

Cora Sherrod Barnes died 12 June 1972 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 13 December 1888 to Jack and Cassie Sherrod; resided at 500 East Green Street; was a retired teacher. Informant was Ralph Sherrod, 327 West 30th Street, New York City.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

413 East Green Street.

The seventy-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

IMG_2909.jpg

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1893; 1 story; Zachariah Barnes house; two-room house; aluminum-sided; Barnes was a porter.” The house was formerly numbered #414.

In the 1912 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Zachariah porter 414 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: office maid Mary Palmer, 50, and her children Beatrice, 23, private cook; James E., 18, drugstore delivery boy; Glayds, 14, private nurse; Mary L., 12, private nurse; Lonie, 9; and Robert L., 8.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Palmer Mary (c) janitress h 413 E Green; Palmer Beatrice (c) domestic 413 E Green; and Palmer Edw (c) porter Turlington & Morrison h 413 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 413 East Green, rented at $15/month, Georgia-born household servant Isaac Butler, 44; wife Estelle, a household servant; and lodger Eleanor Deans, 38, also a household servant.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Russell Julia (c) cook h 413 E Green

In the 1947-48 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Lee John W (c; Irene) orderly Woodard-Herring Hosp h 413 E Green

On 16 September 1986, the Wilson Daily Times ran an obituary for Lula B. Collins, who had last lived at 413 East Green:

707 East Green Street.

The seventy-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

IMG_2554.JPG

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1913; 1 story; intact L-plan cottage with bracketed porch.”

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on East Green Street, Lucious Norfleet, 35, laborer; wife Mary, 30; and children James, 10, Josephine, 7, Ruth E., 5, and Jesse L., 4; and boarder Wiley Jones, 26, railroad laborer.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 636 East Green, Will Cuvington, 42, factory fireman; wife Mary, 41; stepchildren Josephine, 18, Ruth, 16, Jessie Lee Northfleet, 13; and adopted son James Northfleet, 1.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 707 East Green, widow Mary Norflet, 40, laundress; daughter Ruth Gillchrist, 20, courthouse maid; and grandchildren Dorthy, 5, Mary L., 3, and Jene Gillchrist, 1.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 707 East Green, Bank Blow, 56, tobacco factory laborer; wife Mary, 50, laundress; and son James H., 7. [Mary Locus Covington Norfleet married Banks Blow in Wilson on 26 November 1933.]

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Blow Banks (c; Mary; 1) tob wkr h707 E Green

Photograph taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2017.

Cockrell’s Grocery.

Wilson Daily Times, 16 August 1946.

Cockrell’s Grocery, at the corner of Green and Pettigrew Streets one block east of the railroad, served a largely African-American clientele. The building at 404 East Green now houses Saint Mary’s Love and Faith church, a Holiness congregation. Billy Strayhorn and Swindell McDonald, despite their length of service, were teenagers at the time this article was printed. I cannot identify William White with certainty.

Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 2.13.58 PM.png

404 East Green Street, courtesy Google Maps.

705 East Green Street.

The sixty-second in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1913; 2 stories; Hardy Johnson house; Queen Anne house composed of hip-roofed central block and projecting cutaway bay; porch has been modified and original gazebo removed; porch has been modified and original gazebo removed; Johnson was a fireman for the railroad.”

Robert C. Bainbridge and Kate Ohno’s Wilson, North Carolina: Historic Buildings Survey, originally published by the City of Wilson in 1980 and updated and republished in 2010 under the auspices of the Wilson County Genealogical Society, provides additional details about this house, including the photo above. “Built c. 1901 for Hardy Johnson, a fireman, this house is a good example of the type of large house built in Wilson at the turn of the century. Asymmetrically massed with a prominent cross gable wing to one side with a two story faceted bay, the house is transitional in style resembling a Queen Anne house in its massing, but possessing some Colonial Revival details. The generous and well preserved porch has a handsome faceted corner pavilion and a pedimented projecting entry.”

The photo, probably taken about 1979, appears to show a notice of the kind often posted to communicate boarding house rules. By the 1950s, many of the largest homes on East Green had been converted to multi-family dwellings. The house has been demolished.

——

Hardy Johnson, 26, of Wilson township, married Martha Woodard, 25, of Wilson township, daughter of Martha Woodard, on 25 November 1892 at the Amerson place, Wilson. John Ellis and Martha Woodard were witnesses.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: day laborer Hardy Johnson, 33; wife Martha, 31; and children Jessee B., 10, Pauline, 7, Saniga, 5, Roscoe, 3, Herbert, 2, and Johnny G., 5 months.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: railroad laborer Hardy Johnson, 48; wife Martha, 40; and children Pauline, 17, market laborer, Thomas, 15, Rosco, 13, Hermon, 11, Jonnie, 10, Alford, 8, Joseph, 6, Annie L., 4, Hardy, 2, and Maggie L., 5 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 634 Green, Hardy Johnson, 50, foreman at electric light house; wife Martha, 48; and children Sidney, 20, laborer for barber; Roscoe, 23, John, 18, barber, Alfred, 18, Josey, 15, Annie Lee, 13, Hardey, 11, Russell, 8, and Martha, 4; plus lodger James Small, 22, barber.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Hardy Johnson, 61, flagman for A.C.L. Railroad; wife Martha, 60; children Allie L., 19, Martha, 13, and Russell, 17; sister-in-law Maggie Gaston, 50, divorced; granddaughter Mary Johnson, 6; and roomer Duffy Smith, 24, fruit store merchant.

Hardy Johnson died 25 December 1932 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 10 October 1871 in Edgecombe County to Jacob and Clara Johnson; married to Martha Johnson; worked as a day laborer; and resided at 705 East Green.

Martha Johnson died 18 December 1934 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born about 1870 in Wilson County to Martha Woodard; the widow of Hardy Johnson; and resided at 705 East Green. Informant was Martha Gray Johnson, 705 East Green.

814, 810 and 806 East Green Street.

The sixty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As each is described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1925; 2 stories; William Hines tenant house; two-bay, side-hall dwelling with hip roof; built by Hines for tenants.”

Robert C. Bainbridge and Kate Ohno’s Wilson, North Carolina: Historic Buildings Survey, originally published by the City of Wilson in 1980 and updated and republished in 2010 under the auspices of the Wilson County Genealogical Society, provides additional details about these houses, including photos: “806-814 East Green Street. This rhythmic row of identical houses was built as speculative housing c. 1925. The plan is an expansion of the classic shotgun and details reflect a bungalow influence. Constructed as workman’s housing in the late 1920’s, these houses were occupied by a driver, a porter and a cook, among others. It is uncommon to find an entire row of houses such as these still intact.” Unfortunately, numbers 808 and 812 East Green Street were demolished between 1980, when the Inventory was published, and 1988, when the nomination form was completed.

806

The even-numbered side of the 800 block of East Green Street appears to have been skipped in the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Wingate Leon (c; Pearl) driver C Woodard Co Inc h 806 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 806 East Green, rented for $14/month, tobacco factory laborer George Marion, 32, born in South Carolina; wife Emma, 31, tobacco factory laborer; son Robert L. King, 16; boarders Thomas Jones, 22, tobacco factory laborer, and Bert Jones, 36, cook.

In 1940, George Marion registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 18 May 1908 in Sumpter, South Carolina; resided at 806 East Green; was married to Emma Davis Marion; and worked for R.P. Watson Tobacco Company.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Marion Geo (c; Emma) plumber helper h 806 E Green

808

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: White Israel (c) elev opr Federal Bldg h 808 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 808 East Green, rented for $14/month, cafe cook James Morrison, 30, of Maxton, North Carolina; wife Minnie, 30, family cook, of Greene County; daughter Reba, 14; and family cook Lessie McRay, 23.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Morrison Minnie (c) cook Golden Weed Grill h 808 E Green

810

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones Martha (c) lndrs 810 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 810 East Green, rented for $14/month, widow Martha Jones, 67; widow Maggie Crooms, 36; Helen Jones, 16; widower Cornelius Jones, 38, builders supply truck driver; and Oscar Magette, 17, and Hubert Jones, 16, who were Martha’s grandsons.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones Martha (c) lndrs h 810 E Green

812

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Freeman Geo (c; Effie) lab h 812 E Green; Freeman Jas (c) del man h 812 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 812 East Green, rented for $14/month,

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Farmer Jefferson D (c; Irene) del mn h 812 E Green

814

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Woodard Lula lndrs h 814 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 814 East Green, rented for $14/month, Lula Woodard, 40, widow, boarding house operator.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Woodard Lula (c) slswn [saleswoman] h 814 E Green

Lula Woodard died 24 July 1947 at her home at 814 East Green. Per her death certificate, she was born 3 June 1902 in Sampson County, North Carolina, to Harry Boykins and Mary Wronge and was married to Willie Woodard. Willie Boykins, 131 West 143rd Street, New York City, was informant.

Photograph taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2018.

Tate purchases a lot.

On 29 October 1892, Hardy Tate purchased for $700 from George D. and Ella M. Green a 1/3-acre lot on Green Street between Green and H.C. Phillips.

The house Tate erected on this lot burned to the ground under suspicious circumstances shortly after completion. Tate later built this house, probably on the same lot.

Deed book 31, page 342, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson.