Dew

Cemeteries, no. 25: the Dew family cemetery.

The well-maintained Dew cemetery lies behind Repha Church of God on Weaver Road east of the city of Wilson.

The stones mark the graves of Raiford and Jency Short Dew, both born into slavery, and their descendants.

  • Raiford Dew

Raiford Dew Feb 18, 1838 Apr. 12, 1907

In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Haywood [Raiford] Due, 35; wife Quincy [Jency], 34; and children Dennis, 14, Joseph, 12, Benj’n, 10, Caroline, 8, Jeffry, 7, Bush, 5, and Mary, 1.

In the 1880 census of the town of Wilson, Wilson County: Raford Dew, 45, farmer; wife Ginsey, 45; and children Caroline, 20, Bashrod, 14, Mary, 11, Martha, 9, Sallie, 7, W.H., 5, and Moses, 4.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Rayford Dew, age unknown; wife Jensy, age unknown; son Moses, 23; daughter-in-law Eliza, 40; and grandsons Jonie, 1, and Willie, 11.

  • Jency Short Dew

Jency Dew Nov, 5, 1838 June 19, 1922 Wife of Raiford Dew

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Moses Dew, 45; wife Eliza, 49; children Jonie, 19, Dora, 17, Mary, 15, Naomi, 14, David, 13, Pearl, 12, Lucy, 10, Rosetta, 9, and Moses, 3; grandson Johnnie Barnes, 5; and widow Jensy Dew, 83.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Rocky Mount Road via Town Creek, farmer Moses Dew, 45; wife Eliza, 49; children Jonie, 19, Dora, 17, Mary, 15, Naomi, 14, David, 13, Pearl, 12, Lucy, 10, Rosetta, 9, and Moses, 3; grandson Johnnie Barnes, 5; and widow Jensy Dew, 83.

Jency Dew died 5 June 1922 in Wilson township. Per her death certificate, she was born 27 November 1838 in Wilson County to Reddick Short and Easter Dew; was the widow of Raford Dew; and had worked in farming. Moses Dew was informant.

  • Jefferson Dew

Jefferson Dew

In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Haywood [Raiford] Due, 35; wife Quincy [Jency], 34; and children Dennis, 14, Joseph, 12, Benj’n, 10, Caroline, 8, Jeffry, 7, Bush, 5, and Mary, 1.

In the 1880 census of the town of Wilson, Wilson County: Raford Dew, 45, farmer; wife Ginsey, 45; and children Caroline, 20, Bashrod, 14, Mary, 11, Martha, 9, Sallie, 7, W.H., 5, and Moses, 4.

On 25 January 1883, Jeffrey Dew, 21, married Jane Harvey, 17, at Toisnot.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Jeff Dew, 38; wife Jane, 32, farm laborer; children Bessie, 12, Lesse, 9, Lula, 8, Nettie, 6, James E., 3, Lizzie, 2, and Jesse, i month,

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Nash Road, Jeff Dew, 46, farmer; wife Jane, 43, farm laborer; children Bessie, 21, Lessie, 19, Lula, 17, Nettie, 16, Eddie, 13, Lizzie, 12, Jessie, 9, Joseph, 8, Margaret, 6, and Jonah, 3. Jane and all but the youngest two children worked as farm laborers.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Rocky Mount Road via Town Creek, Jefferson Dew, 57, farmer; wife Jane, 55; children Lula, 26, Nettie, 24, Eddie, 22, Jesse, 20, Joe, 17, Margaret, 16, and Jonie, 14.

Jefferson Dew died 1 May 1926 in Wilson township. Per his death certificate, he was 63 years old; was born in Wilson County to Rayford Dew and Jensy Dew; was married to Jane Dew; and worked as a farmer.

  • Mary Dew Armstrong Boyette

Mary Boyette Jan. 6, 1869 Jan. 9, 1960

In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Haywood [Raiford] Due, 35; wife Quincy [Jency], 34; and children Dennis, 14, Joseph, 12, Benj’n, 10, Caroline, 8, Jeffry, 7, Bush, 5, and Mary, 1.

In the 1880 census of the town of Wilson, Wilson County: Raford Dew, 45, farmer; wife Ginsey, 45; and children Caroline, 20, Bashrod, 14, Mary, 11, Martha, 9, Sallie, 7, W.H., 5, and Moses, 4.

On 18 Novcember 1897, Alfred Boyette, 55, of Wilson, son of Hardy Hinnant, married Mrs. Mary Armstrong, 37, daughter of Raford Dew. Missionary Baptist minister M. Strickland performed the ceremony at Raford Dew’s house in the presence of Bush Dew, Moses Dew and Henry Melton.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: “geneator” [janitor] Alfred Boyette, 59; wife Mary, 32; and children Alfred, 1, Etna, 9, and Willie, 13.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 570 Kenan Street, Alfred Boyette, 75, laborer for town; wife Mary, 40; and children Million, 21, and Willie, 18, farm laborers, Edna, 11, and Gency, 9.

Jincy McBride died 3 November 1925 In Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 6 September 1091 in Wilson to Alford Boyett and Mary Dew; was married to Harrison McBride; and worked as a tobacco factory day laborer. Informant was Mary Dew, 304 Walnut Street.

Mary Magdeline Dew Boyette died 9 January 1960 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 6 January 1879 in Wilson County to Raeford Dew and Jessie Dew; was widowed; and resided at 504 Stantonsburg Street, Wilson. James Boyette was informant.

  • Wiley Rountree Sr.

Wiley Rountree Sr. Oct. 5,1871 Jan. 1, 1939 He was faithful to every duty

In the 1870 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Andrew Rountree, 50; wife Nellie, 36; and children Elvy, 5, Rehna, 3, and Willie, 8 months; plus Mariah Farmer, 14.

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Andrew Rountree, 60; wife Nelly, 48; children Elva, 15, Marina, 12, Willie, 10, Syviann, 7, Vaul, 2, and America, 3 months; plus grandson Auston, 3.

On 5 December 1889, Willey Rountree, 20, of Toisnot, son of Andrew and Nelly Rountree, married Martha Dew, 19, of Toisnot, daughter of Raford and Jenny Dew. Free Will Baptist minister Crocket Best performed the ceremony at “the residence of the bride’s father in Toisnot Township, W.C.” in the presence of Alex Williams, Hardy Ellis and A.J. Farmer.

[Death certificates and other records of some of Wiley and Martha Dew Rountree’s oldest children suggest that the couple left Wilson shortly after their marriage and moved throughout the Southeast United States before returning to Wilson County about 1895. For example, Freeman Rountree was born in 1890 in South Carolina or Georgia; Wiley Rountree Jr. was born in Georgia in 1892; and Raiford Rountree was born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1894.]

In the 1900 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Willie Rowntree, 29; wife Martha, 27; and children Freeman, 9, Willie, 8, Rapherd, 6, Captan, 3, Dasie, 2, and Andrew, 1.

On 29 August 1906, Wiley Rountree, 36, of Wilson, son of Andrew Rountree and Nellie Rountree, married Matilda Locust, 31, of Wilson. Primitive Baptist minister Jonah WiIliams performed the ceremony “at Rev Steel’s house” in Wilson in the presence of Moses Dew, F.S. Steele and Jessie Whitehead.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Tarboro Road, Wiley Rountree, 42; wife Matilda, 34; daughter Matha, 20, and her son Roscoe, 2; children Freeman, 19, Wiley Jr., 18, Raford, 16, Captain, 14, Daisey, 13, Andrew, 10, Husband, 9, Nellie, 8, and Frank, 6; and grandson Bosy, 3 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Wiley Rountree, 53; wife Matilda, 44; children Raiford, 25, Andrew, 20, Herbert, 17, Nellie, 16, Frank, 14, and Roscoe, 12; and grandsons Henry C., 6, and Eula, 4.

On 29 December 1929, Wiley Rountree, 60, of Wilson County, married Louvenia Cotton, 45, of Toisnot township. Presbyterian minister C.H. Hagans performed the ceremony in the presence of James H. Armstrong, John H. Armstrong, and Junius Best.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Wiley Roundtree, 63; wife Louvinia, 47; and children Tennie L., 16, Carrie, 14, Henry C., 17, Paul A., 8, and Frank, 25.

Wiley Rountree died 1 January 1939 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 68 years old; was married to Louvenia Rountree; was a farmer; and was born in Wilson County to Andrew Rountree and Nellie Barnes. Informant was Wiley Rountree Jr.

  • Martha Dew Rountree

Martha Rountree Born Nov. 3, 1870 Died Nov. 4. 1905

In the 1880 census of the town of Wilson, Wilson County: Raford Dew, 45, farmer; wife Ginsey, 45; and children Caroline, 20, Bashrod, 14, Mary, 11, Martha, 9, Sallie, 7, W.H., 5, and Moses, 4.

On 5 December 1889, Willey Rountree, 20, of Toisnot, son of Andrew and Nelly Rountree, married Martha Dew, 19, of Toisnot, daughter of Raford and Jenny Dew. Free Will Baptist minister Crocket Best performed the ceremony at “the residence of the bride’s father in Toisnot Township, W.C.” in the presence of Alex Williams, Hardy Ellis and A.J. Farmer.

In the 1900 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Willie Rowntree, 29; wife Martha, 27; and children Freeman, 9, Willie, 8, Rapherd, 6, Captan, 3, Dasie, 2, and Andrew, 1.

  • William Henry Dew

Wm. Henry Dew May 1874 Jan. 19, 1936 Gone but not forgotten.

In the 1880 census of the town of Wilson, Wilson County: Raford Dew, 45, farmer; wife Ginsey, 45; and children Caroline, 20, Bashrod, 14, Mary, 11, Martha, 9, Sallie, 7, W.H., 5, and Moses, 4.

William Dew, 32, of Wilson, son of Raford and Jensie Dew, married Susana Savage, 17, of Wilson, daughter of Amy Savage, on 10 October 1906 at Susana Savage’s residence. Primitive Baptist minister Jonah Williams performed the ceremony in the presence of Moses Dew, John Crisp and Leavi Arrington.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County — on New Stantonsburg Road, William Dew, 45; wife Susanna, 29; children Pearlie, 12, James W., 10, Lester, 9, Mary, 7, Levi, 5, Mamie, 4, Elnora, 2, and Ernest, 3 months; and mother-in-law Emmie Savage, 55.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County — William Dew, 55; wife Susanna, 40; children Pearlie, 22, James W., 20, Lester, 18, Mary L., 17, Levy, 15, Mamie, 13, Elnora, 11, and Earnest, 9, Gladys, 7, Alice, 5, and Orlanda, 4.

William Dew died 17 January 1936 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born in May 1874 in Wilson County to Raford Dew and Jensie Dew; was married to Susana Dew; and was a farmer.

  • Nettie Dew Viverette

Jesus Saves Nettie D. Vivret Born March __ 1895 Died June 16 _____

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Jeff Dew, 38; wife Jane, 32, farm laborer; children Bessie, 12, Lesse, 9, Lula, 8, Nettie, 6, James E., 3, Lizzie, 2, and Jesse, i month,

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Nash Road, Jeff Dew, 46, farmer; wife Jane, 43, farm laborer; children Bessie, 21, Lessie, 19, Lula, 17, Nettie, 16, Eddie, 13, Lizzie, 12, Jessie, 9, Joseph, 8, Margaret, 6, and Jonah, 3. Jane and all but the youngest two children worked as farm laborers.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Rocky Mount Road via Town Creek, Jefferson Dew, 57, farmer; wife Jane, 55; children Lula, 26, Nettie, 24, Eddie, 22, Jesse, 20, Joe, 17, Margaret, 16, and Jonie, 14.

Willie Viverett, 30, of Wilson County, son of Ephriam Joyner and Clara Viverett, married Nettie Dew, 26, of Wilson County, daughter of Jefferson Dew and Mary J. Dew, on 30 March 1921. Baptist minister Elias Lucas performed the ceremony at Mary J. Dew’s residence in Wilson in the presence of Andrew Rountree, Moses Dew and Raiford Rountree.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Willie Viverett, 39; wife Nettie, 35; sister Margaret Sauler, 26; and widowed mother Jane Dew, 65.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson township: at 914 Carolina Street, Willie Viverette, 50, state laborer; wife Nettie, 47, laborer; daughter Frances, 4; and roomer Nancy Barnes, 24, cook.

Nettie Vivrett died 16 June 1955 in Norfolk, Virginia. Per her death certificate, she was born 4 March 1895 in Wilson, N.C., to Jefferson Dew and Jane Harvey; was married to Willie Vivrett; and resided at 4208 Bowdens Ferry Road.

  • Bushrod Dew

Bush Dew Born Oct 27 [broken] April 1920

In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Haywood [Raiford] Due, 35; wife Quincy [Jency], 34; and children Dennis, 14, Joseph, 12, Benj’n, 10, Caroline, 8, Jeffry, 7, Bush, 5, and Mary, 1.

In the 1880 census of the town of Wilson, Wilson County: Raford Dew, 45, farmer; wife Ginsey, 45; and children Caroline, 20, Bashrod, 14, Mary, 11, Martha, 9, Sallie, 7, W.H., 5, and Moses, 4.

On 19 January 1892, Bush Dew, 26, married Susan Melton, 23, at M.C. Melton’s.

In the 1900 census, Bush Dew, 35; wife Susan, 32; and children Effa, 7, Etta, 6, and Losse, 4.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Bush Dew, 45; wife Susan, 42; and children Effie, 15, Edward, 14, Dossie, 13, Nannie, 8, and Van, 8.

Bush Dew died 3 April 1920 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 5[illegible] years old; was married to Susan Dew; was born in Wilson County to R.F. Dew and Jennie Dew.

  • Freeman Rountree

Freman Rountree Oct. 5, 1890 Apr. 10, 1963. Gone but not forgotten.

In the 1900 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Willie Rowntree, 29; wife Martha, 27; and children Freeman, 9, Willie, 8, Rapherd, 6, Captan, 3, Dasie, 2, and Andrew, 1.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Tarboro Road, Wiley Rountree, 42; wife Matilda, 34; daughter Matha, 20, and her son Roscoe, 2; children Freeman, 19, Wiley Jr., 18, Raford, 16, Captain, 14, Daisey, 13, Andrew, 10, Husband, 9, Nellie, 8, and Frank, 6; and grandson Bosy, 3 months.

On 31 August 1916, Freeman Rountree, 25, of Wilson, son of Wiley Rountree and Martha (last name not listed, married Vinie Wilson, 18, of Wilson, daughter of Tom Wilson and Anna Wilson. Rev. John A. Barnes, A.M.E.Z. minister, performed the ceremony in the presence of Jesse C. Lassiter, William Knight and Johnnie A. Barnes Jr.

In 1917, Freeman Rountree registered for the World War I draft. Per his card, he was born 5 October 1890; was born in South Carolina; was a self-employed farmer; and lived in Black Creek township. He was literate.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Freeman Rountree, 29, and wife Viana, 20.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Freeman Rountree, 37; wife Vinie, 30; and adopted son Eddie Bynum, 14.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Freeman Roundtree, 49, born in Florida; wife Viney, 38; and cousin Paul, 18, farm helper.

In 1940, Eddie Rountree registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 28 January 1916 in Beaufort County, N.C.; lived on Route 3, Wilson; worked on J.C. Speight’s farm, Route 2, Elm City; and his contact was father Freeman Rountree.

Freeman Rountree died 10 April 1963 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 5 October 1891 in Georgia to Wiley Rountree and Martha Dew; was married to Vinie W. Rountree; and was a farmer.

  • James Edward Dew

James E., son of Jefferson & Jane Dew

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Jeff Dew, 38; wife Jane, 32, farm laborer; children Bessie, 12, Lesse, 9, Lula, 8, Nettie, 6, James E., 3, Lizzie, 2, and Jesse, i month,

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Nash Road, Jeff Dew, 46, farmer; wife Jane, 43, farm laborer; children Bessie, 21, Lessie, 19, Lula, 17, Nettie, 16, Eddie, 13, Lizzie, 12, Jessie, 9, Joseph, 8, Margaret, 6, and Jonah, 3. Jane and all but the youngest two children worked as farm laborers.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Rocky Mount Road via Town Creek, Jefferson Dew, 57, farmer; wife Jane, 55; children Lula, 26, Nettie, 24, Eddie, 22, Jesse, 20, Joe, 17, Margaret, 16, and Jonie, 14.

Eddie Dew died 7 February 1924 in Wilson township. Per his death certificate, he was born 18 June 1896 in WIlson County to Jefferson Dew and Mary Jane Harvey; was single; and was a farmer for Jefferson Dew.

  • William Dew

William Dew Died Oct. 14, 1941 Age 52 Yrs.

  • Calvin Rountree Sr., alias Captain Rountree

Calvin Rountree Sr US Army World War I 1895 1984

In the 1900 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Willie Rowntree, 29; wife Martha, 27; and children Freeman, 9, Willie, 8, Rapherd, 6, Captan, 3, Dasie, 2, and Andrew, 1.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Tarboro Road, Wiley Rountree, 42; wife Matilda, 34; daughter Matha, 20, and her son Roscoe, 2; children Freeman, 19, Wiley Jr., 18, Raford, 16, Captain, 14, Daisey, 13, Andrew, 10, Husband, 9, Nellie, 8, and Frank, 6; and grandson Bosy, 3 months.

Captain Rountree registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County in 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 25 December 1895 in Wilson County; lived on R.F.D. 5, Wilson; and farmed for his father. He signed his card with an X.

On 24 May 1918, Captain Rountree, 22, of Wilson, son of Wiley Rountree and Sarah Rountree, married Lizzie Horne, 19, of Wilson, daughter of Simon Horne and Nancy Horne at Simon Horne’s.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Tarboro Road, farm laborer Cavender Rountree, 25; wife Lizzie, 21; and son Jimmie D., 1.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Captain Rountree, 35, farm laborer; wife Lizzie, 28; children Jimmie D., 13, Viola, 10, Lossie, 9, Martha, 5, Surisa, 3, Will Jr., 2, and Annie M., 10 months.

In the 1940 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farm laborer Calvin Roundtree, 40; wife Lizzie, 40; Viola, 19, Mathie, 15, Swaneebell, 13, Willie Jr., 12, Annie Mae, 9, Rosa Lee, 7, Calvin Jr., 6, Mavis, 4, and Doris, 1.

In 1940, Willie Junius Rountree registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 10 September 1928 in Wilson County; worked on the John Watson farm; and his contact was Calvin Rountree.

  • Lizzie Rountree

Lizzie Wife of Calvin Roundtree 1900 1974

Lizzie H. Rountree died 4 September 1974 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 15 June 1906 to Simon Horne and Nancy Horne; was married to Calvin Rountree; and resided at 904 East Vance Street, Wilson.

  • Rev. Willie Darden

Rev. Willie Darden Son of Windsor and Mattie Born Jan. 24, 1895 Died June 13, 1941

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farm laborer Winston Darden, 37; wife Mattie, 29; children George, 11, Jesse, 8, Willie, 5, William, 3, and Mattie, 1; and mother Mary Darden, 55.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Finch Mill Road, Winsor Darden, 42; wife Mattie, 35; and children George, 22, Jesse, 16, Willie, 14, Winsor, 12, Charlie, 10, Olivia, 7, Annie M., 6, Leroy, 3, and Mattie, 8 months.

Willie Darden registered for the World War I draft in 1917. Per his draft registration card, he was born 23 January 1895 om Wilson County; lived at Route 2, Wilson; was single; and worked as a farm laborer for Frank Langley. He signed his name in full.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Willie Darden, 25; wife Victoria, 19; and son Junius, 2.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farm laborer Willie Darden, 45; wife Victoria, 41; children Willie Jr., 22, Ettie May, 18, Gladys, 16, Dorthy, 14, James Arthur, 12, John, 11, R.T., 10, Remather, 8, Minnie, 6, Carolyne, 4, Percey, 1, and Mattie, 1; and lodger Willie Miller, 24.

  • Vinnie Wilson Rountree

Vinnie Wilson Roundtree March 8, 1900 July 4, 1972

On 31 August 1916, Freeman Rountree, 25, of Wilson, son of Wiley Rountree and Martha (last name not listed, married Vinie Wilson, 18, of Wilson, daughter of Tom Wilson and Anna Wilson. Rev. John A. Barnes, A.M.E.Z. minister, performed the ceremony in the presence of Jesse C. Lassiter, William Knight and Johnnie A. Barnes Jr.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Freeman Rountree, 29, and wife Viana, 20.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Freeman Rountree, 37; wife Vinie, 30; and adopted son Eddie Bynum, 14.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Freeman Roundtree, 49, born in Florida; wife Viney, 38; and cousin Paul, 18, farm helper.

Vinnie Wilson Roundtree died 4 July 1972 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born in 8 March 1898 to Tom Wilson and Anna Briggs; was a retired farmer; was widowed; and resided at 920 Poplar Street. Georgia Wilson, 706 Stantonsburg Street, was informant.

Photographs by Lisa Y. Henderson, May 2019.

Wheeler family tragedy.

Misfortune dogged the Wheeler family for decades.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 March 1896.

Sidney Wheeler was a man, not a boy, and married nine months after this mishap. On 23 December 1896, Sidney Wheeler, 24, married Lou Armstrong, 20, in Wilson. W.T.H. Woodard performed the ceremony in the presence of Richard Renfrow, S.A. Smith and Janie Booth.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: day laborer Sidney Wheelus, 27; wife Lula, 23; and son Sidney, 8 months.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Sidney Wheeler, 40, barber; wife Lou, 40, private cook; and children Sidney, 9, Dave, 7, Floyd, 4, and Emma, 2.

In March 1910, Sidney Wheeler Jr. accidentally shot his sister in the head while playing with a gun. She died instantly. Their mother was away from home cooking supper for Frederick Woodard’s family; their father presumably was also at work. The Wheeler girl’s name is unknown. The 1900 census lists only one child; the 1910, only one daughter, Emma, who lived to adulthood. Though described as eight years old, Sidney Jr. was more likely about ten.

News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.), 17 March 1910.

Fourteen months later, Sidney Wheeler Jr. (still described as eight years old) was charged with assault with a deadly weapon against General Tyler, “another colored boy.”

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Wilson Daily Times, 19 May 1911.

The Daily Times published two articles about the incident. The second doubled down on the sensationalist editorializing, but there seems little question that Sidney Jr. engaged in unusually violent behavior.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 May 1911.

Six months later, a Raleigh paper picked up a local-interest bit from Wilson and printed it using the exaggerated dialect and descriptions saved for negro anecdotes. In a nutshell: Anderson Dew visited Sidney Wheeler”s barber shop. With half his face shaved, Dew attempted to spit. Wheeler warned there was no spitting while he was shaving. Further, there was the matter of Dew having  testified against Wheeler on a liquor charge. Dew distracted Wheeler’s attention, then jumped from the chair and ran off to tell this tale.

The Farmer and Mechanic (Raleigh, N.C.), 7 November 1911.

Sidney Wheeler died 8 March 1912 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 35 years old; was born in Nash County to Richard and Annie Wheeler; worked as a barber; was married; and resided at 710 Vance Street. Lula Wheeler was informant.

Six and-a-half years after their father died, Sidney Wheeler Jr.’s younger brother Dabbie fetched up in court on a breaking and entering charge. As he had already done time on a county road gang, the judge sentenced him to five-to-ten in the state penitentiary.

News & Observer, 7 September 1918.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Hackney Street, college cook Lula Wheeler, 49, widow, and children Richard, 12, Emma, 10, John, 8, and Sammie, 6.

Dabbie Wheeler died four years into his prison term of tuberculosis of the shoulder joint and bowels. He was 17.

Dabbie Wheeler died 21 June 1922 at the State Penitentiary in Raleigh, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born 27 August 1904 in Wilson to Sidney Wheeler and Lula Armstrong and worked as a laborer. He was buried in Chapel Hill.

Ten months later, Sidney Wheeler Jr. escaped from a prison camp near the Rocky Face Mountain quarry in Alexander County, North Carolina. I have found nothing further about him.

Alamance Gleaner, 5 April 1923.

Lulu Wheeler died 5 May 1925 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 11 August 1878 in Elm City to Emma Armstrong; she was the widow of Sid Wheeler; she resided at 523 Church Street; and she did housework for Atlantic Christian College. Emma Wheeler was informant.

How Dew’s Rest Home got financed.

Naomi Elizabeth Morris (1921–1986), who grew up in Wilson, served on the North Carolina Court of Appeals from 1967 through 1982. She was Chief Judge of that court from 1978 through 1982. In an interview conducted in 1983, Judge Morris recollected her efforts to assist the establishment in the 1950s of Wilson’s first sanctioned nursing home for African-Americans. Though considered progressive for her time and place, Judge Morris’ notions of privilege and segregationist propriety (and that of the interviewer) peek through here.

——

PAT DEVINE: One story that I encountered which struck me with interest as something that I’d love to hear you talk more about was, you alluded to one experience you had in helping to do the legal background work for the founding of the first or only home for indigent blacks in Wilson.

JUDGE NAOMI ELIZABETH MORRIS: Not indigent blacks. No, this was a nursing home for blacks. The office had had this woman as a client for many years. She ran a restaurant at one time. She was quite an aggressive, hardworking woman, and she came to me and said that the director of public welfare, Mr. Monroe Fordham [Fulghum], had asked her to open a nursing home for blacks. She had at that time taken in two or three aged people in her home to take care of, under the auspices of the welfare department, and Monroe Fordham had asked her if she would open a nursing home for blacks. She told him that she would if she could get the money, so she came to me to get the money. We went many places to borrow money, including from the black insurance company in Durham, and they would not let her have the money. Although she had sufficient property to secure the note, they would not let her have the money, and that made me perfectly furious. I came back to Wilson and called the Branch Bank and told them the situation. I said, “You will be missing a very good opportunity if you don’t let this woman have the money,” so they said they would. They required a lot of her that they might not have required of a white person in the same situation — I don’t know — but this was something new and untried. The man who did the electrical work took her note for the electrical work without any security. We worked it out to the point that she had her financing, and she paid everybody back ahead of time. One way she did it, in the summer when the crops would be coming in and the people would have gotten their crops harvested from the field, she would get permission to go out to that field and get what was left [gleaning], the small potatoes that they didn’t pick up, the beans on the bottom part of the vine. She would go get those, and that’s the way she fed her people and was able to feed them cheaper than a lot of people could run a home. Extremely well run.

PAT DEVINE: Is it still there?

JUDGE NAOMI ELIZABETH MORRIS: Oh, yes, it’s still there. About five years after she borrowed the money, the Branch Bank called me and asked me if she would be interested in adding onto her home, that they would be glad to let her have the money. I always wanted to write the insurance company in Durham and say something to them, but I didn’t.

PAT DEVINE: That’s hard to understand.

JUDGE NAOMI ELIZABETH MORRIS: It is hard. It was very difficult for me to understand, because they always talk about looking after their own and the fact that white people don’t do things they ought to for them.

PAT DEVINE: What is this woman’s name?

JUDGE NAOMI ELIZABETH MORRIS: Geneva Dew.

PAT DEVINE: Is she alive?

JUDGE NAOMI ELIZABETH MORRIS: Oh, yes, she’s alive and doing well. I hear from her at least twice a year. She attended my swearing-in ceremony and the party that was given afterward. I’m very fond of her. She’s a very fine person.

——

Nina Aldridge Faison Hardy at Dew’s Rest Home, circa mid 1960s.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer William Winn, 59; wife Jennie, 48; and children Charley, 21, John, 19, Dorch, 13, Pink, 10, and Jeneva, 8.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: odd jobs laborer Willie Winn, 62; wife Jennie, 60; children Roy, 23, and Pink, 20; and lodger Lula Ward, 45.

On 27 July 1935, Ernest Dew, 26, of Wilson County, son of Frank Dew, married Geneva Dew, 23, of Wilson County, daughter of Willie and Jennie Wynn, in Nashville, Nash County.

Willie Wynn Jr. died 11 February 1940. Per his death certificate, he died 11 February 1940 in Wilson; had been married to Jennie Wynn, but was a widower; resided at 1102 Atlantic Street, Wilson; worked as a laborer; was the son of Willie Wynn and Annie Williams. Geneva Dew, 1102 East Atlantic Street, was informant, and he was buried in Elm City.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directories: Dew Geneva (c) beer 315 Stantonsburg h 203 Stantonsburg. (In the 1947 city directory, the address has shifted 319 Stantonsburg.) The 1950 city directory also shows Dew as owner of a beer establishment.

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Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory (1960).

Earnest Dew died 15 March 1969 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 18 May 1910 to Frank Dew and Cora Braswell; was married to Geneva Wynn; resided at 501 Spaulding Street, Wilson; and was a rest home operator.

Geneva Wynn Dew died 6 November 1984 in Wilson.

Dew’s celebrates a move to new quarters. Wilson Daily Times, 20 June 1964. 

Excerpt from oral history interview with Naomi Elizabeth Morris, November 11 and 16, 1982, and March 29, 1983. Interview B-0050. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; photo of N. Hardy in personal collection of Lisa Y. Henderson. Many thanks to Bob Martin for the correction of Monroe Fulghum’s surname.

The last will and testament of Larry Dew.

On 31 October 1861 (the same day as his brother David Dew), Larry Dew of Wilson County penned a will whose provisions disposed of these 46 enslaved men, women and children:

  • to son John Dew as trustee for daughter Harriet Barbee, wife of Joseph Barbee (and to her outright after Joseph’s death), Milly, Sam and Cherry
  • to son John Dew, Laney and her children Juan, Minerva and Della, valued at $700
  • to son Arthur B. Dew, “boy Raiford,” valued at $600
  • to daughter Pennina Dew, wife of William Hooks, Milbry, Louisa, Jacob, and Venus and her children Letha, Jack and Amos
  • to son Jonathan T. Dew, Caroline, valued at $750
  • to son David Dew, Everitt, valued at $600; a cow and calf; a sow and pigs; a feather bed and furniture
  • to granddaughter Sally Harriet Hocutt, Henry, now with Daniel Hocutt in South Carolina
  • to daughter Mary Ann Peel, wife of Stephen J. Peel, Charlotte, Newry and Reuben
  • to son William L. Dew, “boy Woodard,” valued at $600; one gray horse Charley; a cow and calf; a sow and pigs; a feather bed and furniture
  • to son Moses Dew, Arch, valued at $1000; a sorrel horse Selim; a cow and calf; a sow and pigs; a feather bed and furniture
  • to son Willie Dew, Silvira, valued at $900; one mule Jack; a cow and calf; a sow and pigs; a feather bed and furniture
  • to son George W. Dew, Julia, valued at $900; a mule Gin; a cow and calf; a sow and pigs; a feather bed and furniture
  • to daughter Nancy Dew, Eveline, valued at $900; a feather bed and furniture; and $100
  • “the remainder of my negroes, to wit: Litha, Phereby, Amos, Stephen, Toby, Mourning, Isaac, Sylvester, Lucy, Gilbert, Aaron, Linnet, Gray, little Raiford, Winney, Pearcy, Van Buren, little Everitt, Virgil, and Eliza” to be divided equally among his sons and his daughter Nancy

Dew’s estate entered probate in Wilson County in April 1862. These documents from his estate file, submitted to the court in November 1862, chronicle the calculations behind distribution of his human property. Two and a half years later, the work of Dew’s executor was undone by freedom.

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Estate of Larry Dew (1862), Wilson County, North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Cemeteries, no. 12: the Becky Pate cemetery. 

Just beyond the northeast edge of Lucama, down a sandy road closely bordered in mid-summer by four-foot tobacco plants bristling with green-gold leaves, is the Becky Pate cemetery. I did not see Rebecca Daniels Pate’s grave, but her Wilson County death certificate notes that she was born in 1827 in Wayne County to Arch and Leah Daniel; that she was the widow of Richard Pate; and that she died 31 March 1935 in Cross Roads township, Wilson County. [Census records indicate that she was more likely born about 1845.] Richard Pate died in Cross Roads township on 21 February 1935. His death certificate shows that he was born in about 1835 to unknown parents; was married; was a farmer; and was buried in Pate Daniel Grave Yard. It is probable that this is the same burial ground as Becky Pate cemetery and that the cemetery is located on land that once belonged to Arch Daniel.

  • William Henry Pate

In the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Leah Daniel, 69, and grandson Wm. Henry Pate, 7.

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer William H. Pate, 26; wife Rachael, 24; brother Jesse, 10; sister-in-law Nellie Peacock, 11.

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer William H. Pate, 36; wife Fichrel, 34; and brother Jesse, 20.

William Henry Pate registered for the World War I draft on 12 September 1918 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he lived at Route 3, Lucama; was born 11 February 1874; engaged in farming; and was married to Firchel Pate.

In the 1920 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer William H. Pate, 46, and wife Firchel, 44.

William Henry Pate died 24 October 1921 in Cross Roads township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 1873 in Wayne County to Alford Pate and Pollie Ann Daniel and was a farmer.

  • Mittie Daniel Dew


Mittie D. Dew was a granddaughter of Arch and Lear Daniel. Her murder is detailed here.

  • Polly Ann Artis Daniel

Polly Ann Artis Daniel was married to Isaac Daniel, grandson of Arch and Leah Daniel. (Polly is listed as Isaac’s first wife on his death certificate. And Rebecca Pate is listed as his mother.) Polly Ann died in 1908.

  • Benjamin Barefoot

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Mike Barefoot, 36; wife Caroline, 26; and children Olive, 12, Willie, 10, Rena, 8, Benjamin, 6, Ida, 4, Warren, 2, and Julia, 1.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Caroline Barefoot, 50, and children Ben, 21, Jula, 19, and Willie, 29.

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: on Railroad Street, Benjamin Barefoot, 28, brickyard laborer, and his companion William Williams, 35, also a brickyard laborer.

Ben Barefoot registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County on 12 September 1918. Per his registration card, he was born 15 January 1881; resided at Route 1, Lucama; worked for Sparse Renfrow; and his nearest relative was Wiley Barefoot.

  • Ed Manuel

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farm laborer Willis Adams, 65, and wife Jane, 65, plus Ed Manuel, 25, farm laborer.

Ed Manuel registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he resided in Lucama, Wilson County; was born 17 September 1879; worked as a farmer for E.B. Capps; and his nearest relative was Pinkney Williams, Florence, South Carolina.

In the 1920 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Ed Manuel, 30, farmer.

In the 1930 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Edd Manuel, 49, farmer.

In the 1940 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Edd Manuel, 61, farmhand.

Ed Manuel died 19 September 1944 in Fayetteville, Cross Creek township, Cumberland County, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was single; born in South Carolina about 1885; worked as a farmer; and was buried in Beckie Pate cemetery, Wilson County. Informant was Hubert Knight, Route 2, Wilson.

Dew triangle ends in murder.

The story broke on the Fourth of July 1907. Raiford Dew had shot and killed his wife Mittie and her lover — his brother Amos Dew. Newspapers across the state could not resist the tragedy:

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News & Observer (Raleigh), 4 July 1907.

A few days later, the Clinton Caucasian reported different details.

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Clinton Caucasian, 11 July 1907.

Unsurprisingly, Raiford Dew was convicted of second degree (unpremeditated) murder three months later. (And attention moved to another act of violence — the murder of Wiley Faison by Will Scarborough at a “negro dance” on a farm southeast of Wilson.)

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News & Observer (Raleigh) 12 October 1907.

Somewhat surprisingly, five years later, Dew received a conditional pardon at the recommendation of the trial judge and jury.

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Greensboro Daily News, 16 November 1912.

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In the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Louisa Dew, 35, and children Isaac, 20, Nellie, 17, Mourning, 10, Grant, 9, Raiford, 7, Mary Ann, 6, and Amos, 2.

On 10 August 1895, Rayfus Dew, 22, of Cross Roads township, son of Amos and Louisa Dew, married Mitty Daniel, 18, of Cross Roads, daughter of Isaac and Edna Daniel. Free Will Baptist minister Daniel Blount performed the ceremony at Pine Grove in Wilson township. Tom Moore, Noah Moore and Riney Ricks were witnesses. [William H. Pate, who fled from Raiford Dew’s threat, was the son of Alford and Polly Ann Daniel Pate and was Mittie Daniel Dew’s cousin.]

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farm laborer Roford Dew, 25; wife Mittie, 20; and children Lee M., 3, and Murray, 5 months. Two households away:  widow Louisa Dew, 65; daughter Mary, 27, and son Amos, 20; Roselle Deans, 75; and widowed sister Ellen Emerson, 60.

Mittie Dew was buried in Becky Pate cemetery near Lucama. Her headstone notes that she was the wife of R.D. Dew and proclaims her “Gone but not forgotten.”

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In the 1910 census of Halifax township, Halifax County: at State Farm #1, Raiford Dew, 38, prisoner.

On 23 August 1914, Raiford Dew, 44, of Cross Roads township, son of Amos and Louisa Dew, married Maybel Dawson, 18, of Cross Roads township, daughter of Perry and Sarah Dawson. Witnesses were Grant Dew, W.H. Mickerson and Vanderbilt Dawson.

In the 1930 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Raiford Dew, 57; wife Mary Belle, 34; and children Clarence, 15, Lema, 13, and Joseph, 11; sister-in-law Dazzell Dawson, 17, and her daughter Sarah, 4; and brother-in-law Willie Dawson, 19.

Raford Dew died 28 December 1933 in Black Creek township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 62 years old; married to May Belle Dew; was a farmer; and was the son of Amos and Louisa Dew.

Photograph of headstone courtesy of Findagrave.com.

The obituary of Tobias Dew.

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Wilson Daily Times, 30 April 1947.

In the 1880 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Isaac Dew, 30; wife Esther, 24; children Annie, 12, Willie, 9, Tobias, 8, Martha, 4, Lesie, 3, and Laura, 2; plus farmer Burden Barnes, 28, and his wife Delphina, 19, who were white.

On 20 May 1918, Tobe Dew, 45, of Crossroads township, son of Isaac and Easter Dew, married Ardella Scarboro, 25, of Crossroads township, daughter of John and Ardella Scarboro of Oxford, North Carolina, at the courthouse in Wilson.

Toby Dew registered for the World War I draft on 12 September 1918:

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In the 1920 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Tobey Dew, 40; wife Ardella S., 26; and children Anna, 9, and Easter, 6; sisters Martha, 30, and Georgia, 28; and widowed mother Easter, 60.

In the 1930 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: Tobie Dew, 52, farmer; wife Ardella, 36; and daughter Eva, 14.

On 3 January 1933, James Arthur Bynum, 25, of Crossroads township, son of Ora Bell Bynum, married Eva Dew, 18, of Crossroads, daughter of Tobie and Ardella Dew in Wilson. Elder Arthur Fuller of the Holiness church performed the ceremony in the presence of L.L. Harvey, Stephen Coleman, and Andrew Rountree.

In the 1940 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farm laborer Tobey Dew, 67; wife Ardella, 46; granddaughter Thelma, 9; and widower cousin Gabriel Hooks, 75.

Tobie Dew died 28 April 1947 in Crossroads township Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was married to Ardella Dew; born 10 May 1874 in Wilson County to Isaac Dew and Easter Barnes; and had been engaged in farming. Della Dew was informant.

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Friendship Primitive Baptist Church today, just west of Lucama. The church was among those lead by Elder Fate Melton.

A&T trade school students.

From the list of trade school students in the 1922-23 Annual Catalog of the Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina —

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  • Thomas Ellis
  • Reddick D. Dew — on 5 June 1917, Reddick David Dew registered for the World War I draft. Per his registration card: he was born 11 September 1894 in Lucama, North Carolina; worked “farming and laboring on brick yard” for C.D. Dew and John H. Moore of Lucama; and was single. He signed his card “R.D. Dew.” In the 1920 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Cornelius D. Dew, 52; wife Cora L., 39; and children Reddick D., 25, Joseph, 19, Martha L., 16, Grady, 15, Orena, 14, Lee C., 10, David H., 5, and Mary N. Dew, 1. In 1942, Redick D. Dew registered for the World War II draft in New York City. Per his draft registration card: he was born 11 September 1894 in Wilson; resided at 2453 7th Avenue, Apartment 24; his contact was Apcillar Dew of the same address; and he worked for Arthur Prazo.
  • Richard O. Edwards