World War I

He knows nothing of the death of his wife.

201706301516175421

Wilson Daily Times, 25 October 1918.

Lucy Barnes‘ death certificate:

In the 1900 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: Ransom Ruffin, 30; wife Maggie, 33; and children Claudius, 7, Floyd, 6, and Selia Ruffin, 3; plus “son-in-law” William Barnes, 17, and “daughters-in-law” Lucy, 15, and Bertha Barnes, 13. [The Barneses were Ransom Ruffin’s step-children rather than his in-laws. Allen Barnes, presumably, had died, and Ruffin was Maggie’s second husband.]

On 2 December 1903, Lucy Barnes, 21, daughter of Allen Barnes and Maggie Ruffin, married Amos Bynum, 23, son of Joe and Hagar Bynum, in Wilson County. Ransom Ruffin, R.M. Joyner and Pattie Williams were witnesses. [Why, then, was Lucy a Barnes on her death certificate?]

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Plank Road, farmer Amos Bynum, 31; wife Lucy, 25; and daughters Clyde, 8, and Penny, 4 months. [The article describes three small children. Clyde was probably the daughter who stepped in to care for her younger siblings, including Penny and a son Amos Bynum Jr. (Lucy and Amos are listed on his 1946 marriage license and his death certificate.)]

Letter from a colored soldier.

Pages from WDT articles

Wilson Daily Times, 4 June 1918.

  • Tate — Most likely, barber Noah J. Tate.
  • Walter Hines – Barber Walter S. Hines.
  • Dr. Bess
  • J.F. Freeman — Julius F. Freeman Jr. was among scores of Wilson County men ordered to report for military duty in the spring of 1918.
  • Robert Best — Robert Best registered for the draft in June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 17 July 1895 in Wilson and worked as bellhop at the Yarmouth Hotel in Atlantic City, New Jersey. He signed his name “J. Robert Bess.” (In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: house carpenter Orange Best, 67; wife Hansy, 60, laundress; son Oscar, a widowed grocery owner; daughters Roberta, 22, laundress, and Bethena, 19; son Robert, 17, laborer; and granddaughter Sarah, 8.
  • “Old Dr.”
  • Mike — perhaps Roderick “Mike” Taylor.
  • Floyd — perhaps Floyd A. Mitchell.
  • Faulk
  • Milton
  • Arthur — Perhaps Arthur Darring or, more likely, Arthur N. Darden, both of whom were called up in March 1918.

Men ordered to report, no. 4.

On 30 March 1918, the Wilson County Draft Board inducted these 24 African-American men into military service and ordered them sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, for basic training.

report

  • Will McNeill registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 near Denver, Colorado; resided on Sugg Street, Wilson; was a laborer for R.G. Lassiter & Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Zion Powell registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 4 April 1889 in Newport News, Virginia; resided in Wilson; was a laborer for Jake Matthews, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Alexander B. Joyner registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896, Wilson; resided at 616 Viola Street, Wilson; was a chair pusher (?) for Shill Company, Atlantic City; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘A.B. Joyner.’
  • Willis Hackaday
  • Samies Simpson registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 11 May 1896 in Rocky Point, North Carolina; resided at 525 Bank Street, Wilson; was a laborer for W.T. Russel Box Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Samie Simpson.’
  • Abert Robert Lee Bullock registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 19 February 1895 in Wilson; resided at 410 North Pine Street, Wilson; was a cook at the New Briggs Hotel in Wilson; and was single. He was short and medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Abert Robert Lee Bullock.’
  • Columbus Stewart registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 25 December 1895 in Feuquay Springs, North Carolina; resided in Wilson; was a convict in Wilson County; and was married. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Columbus Stewart.’
  • Waverly Murfey registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Mount Olive, North Carolina; resided in Wilson; was a prisoner on Wayne County Public Roads; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Solister Coleman registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 30 April 1894 in Nichols, South Carolina; resided at 517 East Nash Street, Wilson; worked as an express laborer for Saw[?] Express, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Solister Coleman.’
  • Two African-American men named Will Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per their registration cards, the first was born 6 January 1890 in Wilson County; resided on East Street, Wilson; was a cook for C.E. Artis in Wilson; and was single. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Will Barnes.’ The second was born 13 August 1892 in Wilson; resided at 310 Kenan Street, Wilson; was a laborer for John Dew, Wilson; was married with a child. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Raston Williams
  • George Hawkins registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born on an unspecified date in Wilson County; resided in Wilson, care of Wiley Corbett; was a stable boy for Ed Dillard, Wilson; and was single. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Ernest Hines registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born on 24 December 1895 in Elm City; resided in Elm City; was a farm laborer for Geo. Gaston in Elm City; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X. The card carried this notation: “Registered by order of U.S. Marshal.”
  • Five African-American men named Henry Williams registered for the draft in Wilson County. This is most likely the Henry Williams born 1 January 1895 in Lynchburg, Virginia. Per his registration card, he resided in Wilson; worked on the roads of Wilson County; and was single. He was short and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Floyd Pender registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 14 March 1896 in Wilson County; resided in Wilson; was a bootblack for Tate & Hines in Wilson; and was single. He was short and medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Floyd Pender.’
  • Stacey Edwards
  • Three African-American men named John Artis registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. This was most likely either John Ed Artis born 31 March 1889 in Stantonsburg or John Artis born 16 March 1894 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, the elder John Artis worked as a farmer for E.B. Graves of Wilson; was married with four children; medium height and weight, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card with the X. The younger John Artis resided on East Green Street, Wilson; was a porter at Hotel Briggs, Wilson; and was single. He was short and of medium weight, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Lonnie Jackson registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 12 September 1895 in Beaufort County, North Carolina; resided at 217 Railroad Street, Wilson; was a laborer for Wilson Cotton Mill; and was single. He was short and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. Notation: “Hand has been injured.” He signed his card with an X.
  • Burley Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 7 April 1896 in Greene County, North Carolina; resided at 615 Robinson Street, Wilson; worked repairing machinery for C.H. Darden in Wilson; and was single. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Burly Brooks.’
  • Earnest Chester Byrd registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 17 March 1896 in Harnett County, Nirth Carolina; resided at 404 Goldsboro Street, Wilson; was a butler for Mrs. Ed. Woodard, Wilson; and was single. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Earnest C. Byrd.’
  • Strat Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 in resided in Wilson; was a laborer for R.G. Lassiter & Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Amos Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Black Creek; resided in Wilson; was a farm laborer for P.S. Horne, Black Creek township; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Plummer Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Pitt County, North Carolina; resided on R.F.D. 6, Wilson; was a farming hand for W.F. Woodard, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.

U.S. Lists of Men Ordered to Report to Local Board for Military Duty, 1917-1918, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Men ordered to report, no. 3.

On 30 March 1918, the Wilson County Draft Board inducted these 25 African-American men into military service and ordered them sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, for basic training.

report-5

  • Charlie Harris
  • Jimmie Pender registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in December 1888 in Georgia, resided on a rural free delivery route outside Wilson, worked as a railway laborer for Norfolk Southern Railway Company, and had a wife and child. He was of medium height and stout, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Willie Donald
  • Arthur Darring
  • Paul A. Kelly
  • William Gaston registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Elm City, resided in Elm City, farmed for P.C. Cobb near Elm City, and was married. He was tall and slender, with dark blue(?) eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • David Barnes
  • Charlie Rice registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 25 June 1886 in Danville, Virginia; resided at 522 East Nash Street, Wilson; was a laborer for W.T. Clarke in Wilson; and was single. He was tall and slender, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Julius Franklin Freeman registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 9 December 1887 in Wilson; resided on Nash Road, R.F.D. #4, Wilson; worked as a brickmason for H.T. Crittenden in Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Julius F. Freeman.’
  • Will Dixon registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Farmville, North Carolina; resided in Stantonsburg; was a laborer at W.L. Russell Box Company; and was single. He was short and of medium weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Luther Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in6 June 1890 in Wilson County; resided in Walstonsburg; was a laborer on H.H. Walston Jr.’s farm; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Eddie Dew registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in May 1896 in Wilson County; resided at 617 Darden, Wilson; was a laborer for John B. Deans, Wilson; and was single. He was slender, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card ‘Eddie Dew.’
  • Mancie Gaston registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 10 June 1892 in Elm City, resided in Elm City, worked as a barber for G.A. Gaston in Elm City, and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Mancie Gaston.’
  • Moses Parker registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 31 August 1889 in Nash County; resided at 305 Barnes Street, Wilson; was a hack driver for Crockett & Aikens, a stable on Barnes Street; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card ‘Moses Parker.’
  • Alonzo Coley registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 8 September 1890 in Pikeville, Wayne County; resided at 105 East Street, Wilson;    worked as a carpenter for Barney Reid “in the Town of Wilson”; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card ‘Alonzo Coley.’
  • Dave McPhail registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in April 1896 in Wade [sic, Wayne? Wake?] County; resided in Darden’s Alley, Wilson; worked as an auto driver for S.H. Vick in Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Augustus Gaston registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 28 March 1894 in Elm City, resided in Elm City, worked as a barber for G.A. Gaston in Elm City, and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Augustus Gaston.’
  • Ernest Moore registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in August 1894 in Greenville, North Carolina; resided at 517 Nash Street, Wilson; worked as a laborer for C.E. Moore in Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair, and had rheumatism. He signed his card with an X.
  • Hayes Boatman registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 23 August 1896 in Raeford, North Carolina; resided on Hines Street, Wilson; was a box factory employee for W.J. Russell Box Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Julius Rountree registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 4 March 1895 in Greenville, North Carolina; resided in Wilson; worked as a mechanic for Samuel Vick in Wilson; and had a wife and child. He was tall and of medium build, with brown eyes and dark hair. He signed his card ‘Julius Rountree.’
  • Roscoe Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 28 December 1895 in Wilson; resided on Vance Street, Wilson; was an unemployed laborer; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Roscoe Williams.’
  • Orlando Farmer registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 5 November 1886 in Wilson; resided at 643 Nash Street, Wilson; was a drayman for Boykin Grocery Company, Wilson; and was single. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Olander Farmer.’
  • John Tyler registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 26 March 1895 in Charleston, West Virginia; resided in Darden’s Alley, Wilson; worked as a barber for Charlie Knight, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • John Hardy Ellis registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 10 January 1895 in Wilson County; resided in Stantonsburg; was a section hand for Norfolk Southern R.R. Company; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark eyes and hair and had “one finger off on right hand.” He signed his card ‘John Hardy Elies.’

U.S. Lists of Men Ordered to Report to Local Board for Military Duty, 1917-1918, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Buffalo soldier; or the colored man in the fight.

WDT 4 11 1917 WW1 soldier Farrior

Wilson Daily Times, 11 April 1917.

—–

Rev. Owen L.W. Smith was a teacher, pastor of Saint John A.M.E. Zion Church, and United States consul general in Liberia.

In the 1900 census of Lisbon township, Sampson County, North Carolina: Virginia-born preacher Hennry Farrior, 39, wife Izzy, 37, children Lillie, 17, Dallas, 15, and Diane, 5, and divorced brother-in-law Richard Robinson, 50. Dallas and Richard worked as farm laborers. [Henry W. Farrior was an A.M.E. Zion minister.]

It appears that soon thereafter Dalley tried his luck up North and, on 4 October 1903, this tiny ad appeared in the classified ads of the Philadelphia Inquirer:

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On 15 May 1905, in Manhattan, New York City, William H.D. Farrior [Dalley’s full name] married Florence Seel.

Before long, though, he returned to North Carolina. In the 1910 census of Lisbon township, Sampson County, North Carolina: house carpenter Dalley Farrior, 26, wife Florance, 22, and children James, 3, and Florance (Jr.), 1. [I have not found a marriage license for Dalley and Florence. Their daughters Florence Elizabeth, born 15 January 1909, and Sadie Carolina, born 6 November 1910, filed delayed birth certificates in Cumberland and Sampson Counties, respectively.]

At an unknown date, Dally Farrior enlisted in the United States Army’s Tenth Cavalry Regiment, a segregated unit that was one of the original regiments of Buffalo Soldiers. His role in the Army’s Mexican Expedition would garner him a measure of recognition and probably helped him secure government employment.

As adapted from Wikipedia: the Punitive Expedition, officially known in the United States as the Mexican Expedition, was an abortive military operation conducted by the United States Army against the paramilitary forces of Francisco “Pancho” Villa from 1916 to 1917. The expedition was retaliation for Villa’s invasion of the United States and attack on the village of Columbus, New Mexico, during the Mexican Revolution. More than 5,000 U.S. troops under General John J. Pershing, including elements of the 7th Cavalry and the 10th Cavalry Regiment, entered Mexico in hot pursuit of Villa. The campaign consisted primarily of dozens of minor skirmishes with small bands of insurgents. On 21 June 1916, two troops of the 10th, totaling 92 troopers, attacked Mexican Federal Army troops in the Battle of Carrizal, Chihuahua. Twelve U.S. troops were killed and 23 taken prisoner; 45 Federales were casualties, including the Mexican general Gomez. The engagement nearly precipitated open war with Venustiano Carranza’s Mexican government, but both governments immediately moved to lessen tensions and open negotiations for U.S. withdrawal, preventing war. The Carrancista government repatriated the American prisoners at El Paso, Texas.

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Washington Post, 1 July 1916.

Dalley was one of the highest-ranking enlisted men in the Tenth Cavalry and, as an escapee from the bloodshed, was called upon to testify to the debacle. He gave the affidavit below to then Major Charles Young, the African-American commander of the Tenth Cavalry’s Second Squadron.*

dfarrior

State of Chihuahua, Camp U.S. Troops, Colonia Dublan, Mex.  }  ss.

Personally appeared before me the undersigned authority, one Dalley Farrior, Q.M. Sergeant, Troop C, 10th Cavalry, who being duly sworn according to law, deposes and says, concerning the engagement between American troops commanded by Capt. Charles R. Boyd, 10th cavalry, and Carranza troops near Ahumada, Mexico, on June 21st, 1916, that “when we arrived near Carrizal, the Captain had us load our rifles and pistols. We halted and sent a messenger in to ask permission to pass thru the town. When the messenger returned several Mexicans came with him, and they [illegible] our point. The Captain went forward and talked to them. He returned to us and said that “It looked favorable, but we could only go north.” He said that his orders were to go east, and he meant to go that way. By this time the general of the Carranza troops had come out and the Captain went forward to talk to him. When he returned he said the general had given us permission to go thru the town, but we could go thru as foragers. As we formed line of foragers, the general called him back again. When he returned he said he would execute fight on foot and advance in that formation. We did this and ordered no man to fire until fired upon. As we moved forward K Troop was on the right and C on the left. The Captain cautioned Sergeant Winrow, who organized the right of C Troop to keep his men on a zigzag line. The Mexicans during this time had formed a line out front about 200 yards away and opened fire on us. We laid down and fired back. Then we advanced by rushes. As to the second rush I was wounded in the right arm, and staid where I was. The line I had been on kept moving forward. On their third rush they reached the Mexican’s front line of defense, where there were two machine guns. By this time Captain Boyd had been shot in the hand and shoulder. Sergeant Winrow had been wounded in the leg and [illegible] Wilhoit had also been wounded in the knee. The Captain tried to get K Troop, which was in our rear, to move up to us. He was shot and killed at this time. Lieut. Adair had gone with his man and was out of sight. Captain Morey said to assemble K Troop on him and we would all surrender. But several men in K Troop remonstrated with Capt. Morey and induced him to make towards an adobe house on our left rear, where we could possibly make a stand. Capt. Morey was very weak from loss of blood and fainted once. From there I finally made my way to the Santa Domingo ranch. From here I finally reached the 11th Cavalry about [illegible] miles west of San Luis.

Further deponent sayeth not,  /s/ Dalley Farrior, Q.M. Sergeant, Troop C, 10th Cavalry.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27 day of June 1916. /s/ Chas. Young, Major, 10th Cavalry, Summary Court.

A year later, on 15 June 1917, in the Nashville Globe‘s “News of the Nation’s Capital”:

screen-shot-2016-11-14-at-8-29-26-pm

Dalley Farrior registered for the World War I draft in Washington, D.C. on 12 September 1918. His draft card reports that he resided at 1830 – 9th Street N.W.; was born 3 September 1984; and worked as a messenger for the federal government at 4 1/2 & Missouri Avenue, S.W., Aircraft Production Division. His nearest relative was Isia Farrior, 11 Winter Street, Hartford, Connecticut. The card also reveals that he was more seriously injured at Carrizal than the Post reported — “gunshot wound in right forearm, hand almost totally paralyzed, in action with US troops in Mexico.”

On 9 January 1918, this tiny listing appeared in the Washington Post:

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It appears to be notice of a suit for maintenance by Dalley’s wife Florence Farrior, and William H. Dalley Farrior seems to have been his full name.

Two days later, on 11 January, the Washington Herald ran this brief:

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Two months later, Dalley threw down the gauntlet with a legal notice naming as defendants his wife and three men, presumably those with whom Dalley believed she had committed adultery.

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Washington Post, 20 March 1918. 

The suit was successful. In the 1920 census of Washington, D.C.: boarders Dalley Farrior, 25, divorced, messenger for War Department; and son James Farrior, 12.

Dalley’s father Henry W. Farrior appeared in Wilson city directories as early as 1916 and throughout the 1920s. In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Christian Church minister Henry W. Farrior, 60, and wife Aria, 60, with boarders tobacco factory stemmer Earnest Bulluck, 35, his wife Lena, 30, and children Earnest Jr., 12, Paul T., 8, and Lee, 7.

Henry William Farrior died 6 March 1937 in Wilson. Per his death certificate: he was born 12 August 1859 in Powhatan, Virginia, to Henry and Sylvia Farrior; resided at 203 Pender Street, Wilson; was married Isiebell Farrior; and was a preacher. Dalley Farrior was informant.

In 1942, Dalley Farrior registered for the World War II draft. His draft card reports that he resided at 2319 Druid Hills Avenue, Baltimore; was born 10 April 1884 in Garland, North Carolina; was employed by Samuel Plato, Turner’s Station, Baltimore; and his nearest relative was Pearl Farrior.

Per the Social Security Death Index, Dalley Farrior died in Baltimore on 7 May 1971. He was survived by daughters Florence E. Farrior and Sadie Farrior Izquierdo. Sadie died in 1995. Florence died 14 October 2015 in New York City at the age of 106.

*A copy of this affidavit is included in the draft of Ann T. Gustavson’s The Question of Pershing’s Verbal Orders: Carrizal 1916, published at http://www.barbarabeatty.com. The original is held by the National Archives and Records Administration.

In observance of Veterans Day.

3-21-1911

Wilson Daily Times, 21 March 1911.

On 12 June 1866, Richard Pate married Rebecca Daniel in Wayne County.

In the 1870 census of Goldsboro township, Wayne County: farm laborer Richard Pate, 37, wife Becky, 32, and daughter Polly, 12. [Next door was a household headed by white farmer Brtant Pate, 48, and nearby were other white Pates. Perhaps Richard’s former owner was one.]

In the 1880 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: Richard Pate, 36, wife Rebecca, 36, and daughter(?) Trecinda, 3.

In the 1900 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Richard Pate, 59, and wife Rebecca, 57.

In the 1910 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Richard Pate, 74, wife Rebecca, 72, and grandchildren Louis Daniel, 30, Roscoe Barnes, 12, and Leanne Barnes, 10.

Richard Pate died 21 March 1915 in Crossroads township. Per his death certificate, he was born in 1855, worked as a farmer, and was buried in the Pete Daniels graveyard. William H. Pate was informant.

——

3-14-1919

Wilson Daily Times, 14 March 1919.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: printing office laborer Charlie Thomas, 49, wife Sarah, 44, and children Elton, 20, hack driver, Lizzie, 18, carpenter (?), Louis, 15, Hattie M., 11, Mary, 5, and Sarah, 18 months. Elton Thomas died 15 December 1970 in Goldsboro, aged 79.

Dave Barnes was the son of Dave and Della Hines Barnes. He died 12 May 1966 at the Veterans Hospital in Durham, North Carolina.

John Parker Battle was the son of Parker and Ella Burston Battle. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: foundry laborer Parker Battle, 54, wife Ella, and children Roberta, 24, a teacher, Grace, 22, a factory laborer, and John, 19.

Charlie Austin was, in fact, Charles Alston. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: day laborer James H. Alston, 29, wife Martha, 28, and children Eula Lee, 6, and Charley, 4. Charles S. Alston eventually migrated to Newark, New Jersey, where he was living when he registered for the draft of World War II.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Richard Parker, 73, wife Lottie, 71, daughter Elizabeth, 27, son David, 28, and grandchildren Moses, 10, and William Henry, 8.

005152194_05419

World War I draft registration card of Moses Parker.

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8-2-1919

News & Observer (Raleigh), 2 August 1919.

Charles Barnes was the son of Wesley and Ella Mercer Barnes. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on the N.&S. Railroad, drayman West Barnes, 22, wife Ella, 47, laundress, and children Sylvester, 17, drayman, Viola, 15, cook, and Charlie, 13, laborer at wholesale store, plus son-in-law James Watson, 23, drayman, wife Lucy, 22, cook, and children West, 4, and Lucy, 3 months. Charlie Barnes died of tuberculosis at an Army hospital in Asheville.

——

ny-age-8-8-42

New York Age, 8 August 1942.

Matthew Stanley Gilliam Jr. was the son of Dr. Matthew and Annie Davis Gilliam.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: filling station attendant Herman Gilliam, 20; his widowed mother Annie, 48, a cook in a private home; and brothers Charles, 28, a waiter at Cherry Hotel, Stanley, 26, a teacher, and George, 22, a janitor at Carolina Theatre.

32892_1020705388_0062-03333

World War II draft registration card of Matthew S. Gilliam.

M.S. Gilliam died of a heart attack at a Veterans Administration hospital in Petersburg, Virginia, on 7 March 1978. He was 64 years old.

U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Men ordered to report, no. 2.

This undated form lists men to be inducted into military service by the Wilson County Draft Board.

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  • James Davis registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 24 November 1889 in Vance County, North Carolina; lived in Spring Hope, North Carolina; was married; and was a fireman for Harris G Quarry Company, Neverson, North Carolina. He was tall, with dark eyes and black hair. He had a broken ankle, but “don’t know any thing about broken ancle.” He signed his name “James Norman Davis.”
  • Burley Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 2 April 1896 in Greene County, North Carolina; lived at 615 Robinson Street, Wilson; was married; and repaired machinery for C.H. Darden, Wilson. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Burly Brooks.”
  • Wade Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 in Black Creek, North Carolina; lived in Wilson; was single with a dependent; and was a self-employed farmer in Black Creek. He was of medium height and build, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • McKinley Justice registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 15 March 1896 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina; lived at RFD#1, Elm City; was single; and was a farmer for Frank Williams, RFD#1, Elm City. He was of medium height and slender build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “McKinley Justice.”
  • Thomas Townsend registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 8 November 1885 in Person County, North Carolina; lived at 415 East Hines Street, Wilson; was single; and was a laborer for Imperial Tobacco Company, Wilson. He was of medium height and build, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Thos Townsend.”
  • Earnest Chester Byrd registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 17 March 1896 in Harnett County, North Carolina; lived at 404 Goldsboro Street, Wilson; was single; and was a butler for Mrs. Ed. Woodard, Wilson. He was tall and of medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Earnest C. Byrd.”
  • Strat Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 in Wilson, North Carolina; lived on Goldsboro Street, Wilson; was single; and was a laborer for R.G. Lassiter & Co., Wilson. He was of medium height and build, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Winsor Darden registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born September 1895 in Wilson, North Carolina; lived in Wilson; was single; and was a self-employed farmer. He was of medium height and stout, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Charlie Sylvester Alston registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 27 March 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; lived at 605 Green Street, Wilson; was single; and was a delivery boy for S.D. Moody, Wilson. He was of medium height and build, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Charles Sylvester Alston.”
  • Walter Applewhite registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 8 February 1896 in Saratoga, North Carolina; lived in Walstonburg, North Carolina; was married; and was a laborer at a saw mill for R.R. Shackleford. He was of medium height and build, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Amos Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 1896 in Black Creek, North Carolina; lived in Wilson; was single; and was a farm laborer for J.S. Horne, Black Creek. He was of medium height and build, with black eyes and hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Nathan Dunnican registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was 21 years old; born in Wilson township; lived at RFD#2, Wilson; was single; and was a farmer for S.J. Watson, RFD #2, Wilson. He was of short and slender, with dark black eyes and hair. He signed his name “Nathan Dunnisan.”
  • Plummer Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 1896 in Pitt County, North Carolina; lived at RFD #6, Wilson; was single; and was a farm laborer for W.F. Woodard, Wilson. He was of medium height and build, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Two men named Charlie Harris registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. (1) Per his registration card, the first was born 22 May 1891 in Wilson, North Carolina; lived at 504 Green Street, Wilson; was single; and was a laborer for Hackney Wagon Company, Wilson. He was of medium height and build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Charlie Harris.” (2) Per his registration card, the second was born March 1894 in Wilson County; lived in Elm City; was single; and worked as a laborer for Williams Lumber Company, Wilson. He was of medium height and build and had black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Albert Howard registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 1892 in Wilson, North Carolina; lived in Wilson; was single; and was self-employed farmer. He was short and of medium height, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Fred Woodard registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 1893 in Black Creek, North Carolina; lived in Stantonsburg; was single; and was a farmer for Fred Washington, Wilson. He was of medium height and slender build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X,
  • Matthew Whitehurst registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born October 1889 in Martin County, North Carolina; lived at RFD#1, Elm City; was single; and was a delivery boy for S.D. Moody, Wilson. He was of medium height and build, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Matthew Whitehurst.”
  • Willie Donald registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 7 March 1888 in Wilson County, North Carolina; lived at Stantonsburg, Wilson County; was single; and was unemployed laborer. He was of medium height and build, with black eyes and hair. He signed his name “Willie Donald.”
  • Ed Rogers Taylor registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 8 May 1896 in Wilson County, North Carolina; lived in Elm City; was married; and was a farmer. He was short and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Arthur Darring registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 4 October 1894 in Wayne County, North Carolina; lived at 210 Carroll Street, Wilson; was single; and was an auto truck driver for Barnes-Harrell Company, Wilson. He was short and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Arthur Darring.”
  • Elijah Farmer registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 24 September 1889 in Saint Louis [Lewis], North Carolina; lived in Wilson; was single; and was self-employed farmer in Black Creek. He was tall and of medium build, with black eyes and hair. He signed his name “Elijah Farmer.”
  • Paul Antrim Kelly registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 28 February 1896 in Wilson County, North Carolina; lived in Elm City; was single; and was a laborer at Williams Lumber Company, Elm City. He was tall and slender, with black eyes and hair. He signed his name “Paul Antrim Kelly.”
  • Walter Haskins
  • William Gaskins 
  • David Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 3 March 1895 in Wilson, North Carolina; lived at 612 East Green Street, Wilson; was single; and worked as a barber for Tate & Hines, Wilson. He was short and medium build, with blue eyes and brown hair. He signed his name “David Barnes.”

U.S. Lists of Men Ordered to Report to Local Board for Military Duty, 1917-1918, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Men ordered to report, no. 1.

On 31 July 1918, the Wilson County Draft Board inducted these 17 African-American men into military service and sent them to Camp Greene, outside Charlotte, North Carolina, for basic training.

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  • John Henry Hunt registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born January 1891 in Spring Hope, North Carolina; lived at 613 Goldsboro Street, Wilson; was married; and was a laborer for contract and engineering company R.G. Lassiter & Co., Wilson. He was of medium height and build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “John Henry Hunt.”
  • Lovett B. Harris
  • Mark Guy Smith registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born March 1896 in Wilson; lived on RFD#2, Wilson; was single; and was a laborer for his father. He was medium height, slender, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Louis Lampley registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 29 April 1896 in Red Springs, North Carolina; lived at Black Creek; was single; and was a self-employed farmer in Black Creek township. He was tall and slender, with black eyes and hair. He signed his name “Louie Lampley.”
  • Luther Harris
  • John Coon
  • Frank G. Newsom registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 15 February 1889 in Lucama; lived in Lucama; had a wife and child; and was a self-employed farmer in Black Creek township. He was of medium height and build, with black eyes and hair. He signed his name “Frank G. Newsome.”
  • Henry Bullock registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 1 June 1896 in Wilson; lived at RFD#1, Wilson; was single; and was a quarry hand for The [illegible] Granite Quarries Company, Neverson, North Carolina. He was of medium height and build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Joseph Palmer registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 15 August 1893 in Wilmington, North Carolina; lived in Wilson; was married with dependents; and was a prisoner in Wilson County. He was of medium height and build, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his name “Joe Palmer.”
  • Jonah Artis registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 7 August 1895 in Wayne County, North Carolina; lived in Stantonsburg; was single; and worked as a laborer and farmer. He was of medium height and build, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Turner Mitchell
  • Columbus King registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 13 July 1890 in Wilson County; lived Stantonsburg; was single; and was a farm laborer for W.T. Harrison. He was short and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Johnie Farmer registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 4 February 1895 in Wilson; lived on Finch Mill Road, Wilson; was single; and was a butler for Mrs. F.S. Davis. He was tall and stout, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Johnie Farmer.”
  • Arthur Vance Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 25 February  1896 in Wilson County; lived on R.F.D. route, Elm City; was single; and farmed for W.M. Whitehead near Elm City. He was of medium height and build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name “Arthur Williams.”
  • Howard Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born May 1889 in Wilson township; lived on Green Street, Wilson; was single; and was a servant for W.S. Harriss. He was tall and stout. He signed his name with an X.
  • Abner Gorham registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 19 November 1893 in Washington, North Carolina; lived at East Goldsboro Street, Wilson; was married; and was a drayman for Wells Grocery Company. He was tall, of medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Liston Hales registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 3 June 1896 in Lake View, South Carolina; lived at 605 Green Street, Wilson; was single; and was a laborer for W.W. Simms Company. He was of medium height, stout with brown eyes and black hair, and his “arm [had] been broken.” He signed his name with an X.

U.S. Lists of Men Ordered to Report to Local Board for Military Duty, 1917-1918, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.