Business

Colored businesses.

Among the businesses highlighted in the Wilson, North Carolina, Industrial & Commercial Directory, published in 1912, were these:

PARAGON SHAVING PARLOR — The establishment is located at 213 East Nash street in Briggs Hotel Block, and it can truthfully be said that it is the most popular Tonsorial parlor in the city of Wilson. It is owned and managed by N.J. Tate and W.S. Hines, both of whom are skilled barbers of long experience. Their genial manner and high class work have won for them the liberal share of the best patronage of the city. Their shop is fully equipped with all the latest appurtenances, and a short visit to this establishment will after passing through their hands, convince you of what the modern, up-to-date barber shops can do to put a man in good humor with himself and the rest of mankind. The shop is equipped with five chairs, each in charge of a professional barber. Go there for your next slave.

JAMES HARDY, SUCCESSOR TO HARDY BROS. — Feed and Livery Stables. This business is located on South Goldsboro street between Nash and Barnes streets and the business has been established for the last four years. The proprietor has succeeded in building up a good patronage. He is very prompt in answering calls and his prices for Livery are very reasonable. Telephone Number 9. Hack and Dray work solicited. The proprietor wants your patronage and guarantees the right sort of treatment. He is a colored man and has the good wishes of all.

  • James Hardy — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: livery stable laborer Jim Hardy, 32; wife Lizzie, 31; sons James, 8, and Lovelace, 6; and boarders Lincoln Sellers, 29, widower and brick yard laborer, and [blank] Batts, 37, water works laborer. James P. Hardy died 20 April 1914 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 27 April 1979 in Greene County to Petter Hardy and Jane Foreman; was married; lived at 508 Vance Street; and was a livery stable employer. Lizzie Hardy was informant. [Who was the other Hardy Brother?]

C.H. DARDEN & SON — This is the only colored firm of undertakers and funeral directors in Wilson, and has been established by the senior member of the firm, C.H. Darden, for some thirty years. His son C.L. Darden has been a member for twelve years years. This place is located at 615 East Nash street, and every branch of the undertaking and Funeral Director business is executed. The equipment includes two Hearses, as well as all other necessary appliances pertaining to the business. They also handle Bicycles and Fire Arms, Victor Talking Machines, Records, Bicycle Sundries, etc. Special attention given to repairs. Their telephone number is 60 and all calls are promptly answered.

OATES & ARTIS — Family groceries. This firm is located at 601 East Nash Street, with telephone connection 456. The business was established in August 1910 and has steadily increased from the beginning. The stock includes all kinds of Groceries, both staple and fancy, Produce, Teas and Coffee, Tobacco and Cigars and the prices are very reasonable. The members of the firm are Wiley Oates, a native of this county, and who has been residing in the City for two years, and Cain Artis, who is also a native of the county, but who has resided in Wilson for twenty-two years. Both are colored men and they are ably attending to the business.

  • Wiley Oates — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Vick Street, dredge boat laborer Wiley Oats, 32; wife Nettie, 28; and daughters Dollena, 8, and Dottie Lee, 13 months. Wily Oates died 23 July 1913 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, she was born 26 September 1879 to Adam and Amanda Oates; was a farmer; and was married.
  • Cain Artis

IDEAL PHARMACY — This is the only colored Drug store in Wilson, and it has been established for about seven years. The proprietors, D.C. Yancy, Ph.G., receiving his degree from the Leonard School of Pharmacy, Shaw University Class of 1905-06, has been connected with the store for the past three years and gas been sole proprietor for the past year and a half. He reports that the business is constantly growing and he hopes within a very few years to have one of the largest stores in the City. He personally presses over the prescription department and absolute accuracy is his watchword. His motto is “Not how cheap but how pure.” The general stock includes fresh drugs, patent medicines, Tobacco, Sundries, etc, soda fountain in connection. 109 South Goldsboro street, phone 219.

 

Contributions to Mercy, part 5.

On 30 January 1947, the Wilson Daily Times published a lengthy list of contributors to the fundraising drive of the Mercy Hospital Women’s Auxiliary. The list, reproduced here in five parts, included many of black Wilson’s leading individuals, businesses and institutions.

Wilson Daily Times, 30 January 1947.

All annotations, some edited for clarity, are entries in Hill’s Wilson City Directory 1947-48.

Contributions to Mercy, part 4.

On 30 January 1947, the Wilson Daily Times published a lengthy list of contributors to the fundraising drive of the Mercy Hospital Women’s Auxiliary. The list, reproduced here in five parts, included many of black Wilson’s leading individuals, businesses and institutions.


Wilson Daily Times, 30 January 1947.

  • J.J. LangleyLangley Jarrette J (c; Mary H) grocery h 901 Viola
  • Jesse Knight — Knight Jessie (c; Eliz) grocery 1105 Washington h 300 N Reid
  • J.F. Downing — Downing James F Jr clk Virginia Downing [grocery]
  • B. Murray
  • C.B. Stewart — Stewart Columbus B (c; Pearl M; 3) grocery 602 W Spruce h 604 ditto
  • E.H. Knight — Knight Elbert emp Williams Lumber r Elm City
  • Rev. R.A. Murphy — Murphy Raymond A (c; Ethel) grocery 210 E Banks h 411 Warren
  • Best Stewart — Stewart Best (c; Marjorie) grocery 411 W Spruce h 409 ditto
  • Jesse Stewart
  • L.E. Smith
  • Wheeler Filling Station– Wheeler D Elmo (Viola H; 2; Wheelers Esso Station) filling station 711 S Goldsboro h 910 Jordon (Five Points)
  • Rev. D.W. Winstead
  • S.M. Steevrus Grocery
  • Dora Gaston — Gaston Dora (c; widow Henry) grocery 706 U S Hwy 301 h 710 ditto
  • Junius Mitchell
  • J.F. Williams Cash Grocery
  • Hochnotts Grocery — Hocutts Grocery (Wm S & Roland B Hocutt) 203 1/2 Stantonsburg
  • Yellow Front Market — (Wm L Dickerson) grocery 501 E Nash
  • J.B. Barnes — perhaps Barnes John B (c; Rachel) Quick Serv Cleaners h 526 E Nash
  • Peter LupeLupe Peter (c; Rosa R) beer 511 E Nash h 717 Viola
  • Thomas Ford — Ford Thomas (c; Dora) confectioner 515 E Nash h 1008 Mercer
  • Baxter Grocer Co. — 703 Crowell
  • Nash Street Cafe — Nash Cafe (John R Saleeby) rest 552 E Nash
  • Mercers Market — Mercers Gro (Jas Mercer) 550 E Nash
  • Haywood Ellis — Ellis Haywood W (c; Ida) beer 506 E Nash h 108 Powell
  • Mr. and Mrs. G.J. Faison
  • S.P. ArtisArtis Separise P (c; Gracie W; Artis Barber Shop) h 537 1/2 E Nash
  • Libby’s Cafe — (c) (Libby McPhatter) rest 539 E Nash
  • Wade Moore — Moore Wade M (c; Eliz O; Wade’s Shoe Shop) h 1001 Faison
  • J.H. Moore — Moore J H floor mgr Big Star Whse h Bowdens
  • Lewis Barber Shop
  • Mack’s Shoe Shop — Mack James (c; Beulah; Baltimore Show Shop) h 206 N Reid
  • C.B. Bynum — Bynum Curley B (c; Pearl) shoe shiner 522 E Nash h 102 Pender
  • Levi Godwin — Godwin Levi (c; Esther) checker Wardrobe Cleaners h 900 Washington
  • J.M. Moore
  • Clarence BestBest Clarence B (c; Eva; East Nash Monument Co) h 1302 E Nash
  • James Whittaker — Whitaker Jas (c; Effie; 2) porter Rick’s Gulf Service h 416 N Vick
  • Gills Gro. — Gills Grocery (John Gill) 915 E Nash
  • W.L. Whitley — Whitley Walter L (Marie; 2; Forbes Grocery) h 1506 S Goldsboro
  • Kirby Sutton — Sutton Kirby (c) grocery 1122 E Nash h 1200 ditto
  • Eula Locus — Locus Eula (c; widow Luther) grocery 1201 E Nash h 1108 S Wainwright Av
  • Sylvester Sauls — Sauls Sylvester (c; Mattie; 2) laborer Williford Bros h 311 Stantonsburg
  • Lillian Williams — Williams Lillian (c; 2) tob wkr h 604 Manchester
  • Leslie Best — Best Lester [sic] (c; Pennie) farmer h 1331 E Nash
  • Mrs. F. McLean — probably Flowers McLean, see below.
  • Alester McLean — McLean Alex (c; Flowers) filling station 1421 E Nash h ditto
  • Cockrells — Cockrells Grocery (John Cockrell) 404 E Green
  • Geo. Wong — Wong George (Canton Restr) h 122 N Tarboro
  • O.K. Cockrell — Cockrell Onnie R. (Lucy I) grocery 513 Stantonsburg h 400 N Goldsboro
  • Dr. B.O. Barnes — Barnes Boisey O (c; Flossie H) physician 525 1.2 E Nash h 613 E Green
  • William Hines — Hines Wm M (c; Ethel L) barber h 615 E Green

All annotations, some edited for clarity, are entries in Hill’s Wilson City Directory 1947-48.

Progressive citizens, pt. 3.

Sometime in 1914, the Wilson Times published a three-page insert highlighting the achievements of the town’s African-American community. “Wilson is fortunate in having a large proportion of sensible negroes,” the writer opined, and counted among the laudable such well-known citizens and institutions as Samuel H. VickJ.D. Reid; Dr. Frank S. HargraveCharlesCamillus and Arthur Darden; Levi JonesWilliam HinesHenry Tart; and H.G. Barnes; Wilson Hospital and Tubercular Home for Colored People; the Colored Graded School; First Baptist Church; Saint John A.M.E. Zion Church; C.H. Darden & Sons Undertakers; and Lincoln Benefit Society.

Here is page 3 of the insert:

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  • Crockett & Aiken
  • Acme Sign Works — “Estimates and designs furnished. Up-to-date electric signs promptly. Gold, silver and brass letters. Satisfaction guaranteed. Glass, cloth, wood, brass, metal and wire. ‘Anything in signs.’ H.G. Barnes, proprietor. ‘U No Barnes.’ He does the work.”
  • The Sanitary Shop — William Hines’ “up-to-date barber shop.”
  • Levi H. Jones, the Barber — “Hot and cold baths. No long waits. Clean shaves and everything sanitary. None but up to date workmen employed. Look for revolving sign opposite Lumina. Old customers stick. Drop in and join the stickers.”
  • Henry Tart, the Reliable Transfer Man — “When you need the luggage wagon or a hack — call Henry Tart at either phone 437 or phone 40. You get personal attention and careful handling of baggage. Our wagons and hacks meet all trains at both depots and we transfer baggage promptly to either depot or home or hotel and do it right. Hand baggage cared for with personal attention and delivered at the depot promptly. Passengers transferring between trains will find our drivers courteous. They will take of your hand baggage as well as transfer your trunks.”

Progressive citizens, pt. 2.

Sometime in 1914, the Wilson Times published a three-page insert highlighting the achievements of the town’s African-American community. “Wilson is fortunate in having a large proportion of sensible negroes,” the writer opined, and counted among the laudable such well-known citizens and institutions as Samuel H. Vick; J.D. Reid; Dr. Frank S. Hargrave; Charles, Camillus and Arthur Darden; Levi Jones; William Hines; Henry Tart; and H.G. Barnes; Wilson Hospital and Tubercular Home for Colored People; the Colored Graded School; First Baptist Church; Saint John A.M.E. Zion Church; C.H. Darden & Sons Undertakers; and Lincoln Benefit Society.

Here is page 2 of the insert:

141061 (1)_Page_2

  • The small photograph, labeled C.J. Darden, actually depicts Camillus L. Darden.
  • Crockett & Aiken — “Moving Houses a Specialty. Barnes Street adjoining Norfolk Southern Station.” Livery stable owner John H. Aiken died in July 1914. In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 123 Pender Street, widow Gergia Akin, 45, livery stable manager; her brother Alexander Crockett, 47, stable salesman; and two laborers, John Norfleet, 30, and Mose Parker, 32.

Untitled

Sanborn insurance map, Wilson, N.C, 1913.

  • City Bakery — “540 East Nash St., under Odd Fellows Hall. First class and sanitary in ever particular.” R.B. Bullock.
  • Down Town Pressing Club — L.B. Barefoot.
  • Dennis Brooks Livery Stables — “Rear Odd Fellow Hall Nash Street.” Georgia-born Dennis Brooks also operated a grocery and a bar.
  • The Globe Theatre — “Odd Fellows Hall Nash St. Only place of amusement of its kind in the county — Colored People.” The Globe was a Samuel H. Vick enterprise.
  • Lincoln Benefit Society — “Chartered by the Legislature of North Carolina as a Fraternal Society. Has councils in the principal towns and cities of the state. Safe, reliable, economical.” Officers included Dr. F.S. Hargrave, president, and S.H. Vick, secretary.
  • Ideal Pharmacy — “Any physician’s prescription will be filled at Ideal Pharmacy exactly as it would be by the best drug stores of the country. We guarantee the quality of drugs, accuracy of compounders, reasonableness of charges, and unexcelled service. Give us a trial.” Darcey C. Yancey opened this pharmacy as early as 1908.
  • J.H. Shaw Groceries — “Fruits, candy, cigars, tobacco, cold drinks and produce. Get my prices before buying cheap for cash.”
  • Dr. W.A. Mitchenor — “Special attention given to the diseases of women and children. … Rear of Ideal Pharmacy.” Dr. William A. Mitchner, a Johnston County native, practiced medicine in Wilson until his death in 1941.
  • Sanitary Shaving Parlor — “The cleanest and most up-to-date in the town. We keep sharp tools, clean towels and pure toilets. Hot towels with every shave if desired. Good barbers always on hand. Satisfaction guaranteed.” Charles S. Thomas (1877-1937) was a native of Bennettsville, South Carolina.
  • R.T. Alston — “Watches, clocks, jewelry, eye glasses, spectacles, etc. I handle the very best grade of watches, such as the Elgin, Waltham, Illinois, Hampden, and Hamilton. Your credit is good. Yes, I will sell you a watch on the weekly payment plan: that is, ‘So much down and so much each week.’ I do a mail order business also. If you want a watch or other jewelry, write me for terms and order blanks. No in a few days I shall have a large stock of watches, clocks, etc. on hand. Call to see me or write.”  Robert T. Alston was a native of Granville County, North Carolina.

Partnerships.

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On 10 December 1940, Separise P. Artis registered Artis Barber Shop, 537 East Nash Street, and Columbus E. Artis and wife Ada D. Artis registered C.E. Artis Funeral Home, 571 East Nash Street, as businesses in Wilson County. (S.P. and C.E. were not close kin, if at all.)

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On 4 December 1940, Cutt Davis and James Work registered Baltimore Shoe Repair Shop.

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On 20 April 1937, Prince Cunningham registered Palace of Sweets, 510 East Nash Street.

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On 19 December 1940, Isaac A. Shade registered Shade’s Pharmacy, 527 East Nash Street.

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  • Cutt Davis —  Cutt Davis died 9 August 1952 in Wilson. Per his death certificate: he was born 28 September 1888 in South Carolina to Berry Davis; worked as a shoemaker; resided at 803 East Nash Street; and was buried at Rest Haven. Informant was Thomas F. Davis of Washington, D.C.
  • Prince Cunningham — on 14 December 1923, Prince Cunningham, 21, of Wilson, son of Sam Cunningham and Annie Bell of Fayetteville, married Annie Bell Ellis, 18, of Wilson, daughter of Jas. and Annie Ellis, in Wilson. J.E. Brown, Primitive Baptist minister, performed the ceremony. In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: taxi driver Prince Cunningham, 28, and wife Annie, 25, lived at 219 Reid Street. On 20 January 1947, Prince Cunningham, 41, son of Samuel Cunningham and Anniebelle Brooks Cunningham of Red Springs, North Carolina, married Lucy Gray Pittman, 24, daughter of Aaron Pittman and Lucy Graham Pittman, in Wilson. Prince Cunningham died 22 January 1968 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 7 February 1903 to Samuel Cunningham and Annie Bell Brooks; was divorced; worked as a barber at Carolina Barber Shop; resided at 714-B South Pender Street; and was buried in Rest Haven cemetery. Gertrude Cummins of New York, New York, was informant.

Record of Partnerships, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office, Wilson.