eating house

Eating houses.

1916-17

Hill’s 1916-17 Wilson, N.C., city directory.

  • Smithy Atkinson
  • Nan Best — Nannie Best. In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 330 South Spring Street: widow Nannie Best, 61, her daughter Frank, 30, son Aaron, 21, and daughter-in-law Estelle, 19, and a lodger, nurse Henrietta Colvert, 24.
  • Burt L. Bowser
  • Dennis Brooks — In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County, 35 year-old Georgia-born merchant Dennis Brooks, wife Mary, 27, and daughter Aleo[illegible], 8, shared a household with Jordan Taylor, 50, and wife Matilda, 40. That same year, Brooks testified concerning a letter in the coroner’s inquest into the death of James A. Hunt. In 1904, Brooks testified at the coroner’s inquest into the death of George Williford concerning a conversation that took place in his bar.
  • Charles Hines — possibly, in the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 408 Wiggins Street, grocery man Charlie Hines, 31; wife Eva, 29; children Anna, 3, and Charlie Jr., 7 months; and cousin Maria King, 10.
  • Goodsy H. Holden — in the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 603 Spring Street, brickmason Goodsey Holden, 59; wife Laura, 52; and roomer Carrie Strickland, 29, tobacco factory worker.
  • Willie A. Johnson
  • Frank Scarborough
  • Annie Smith

1925 eating houses

Hill’s 1925 Wilson, N.C., city directory.

  • James Allen
  • John Barnes
  • William I. Barnes — William Ichabod Barnes. In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 401 Pine Street, tobacco laborer Samuel Ennis, 26, wife Maggie, 29, and sons Freeman, 12, and Earl, 2; boarder John Smith, 21, a wagon factory worker; cafe owner William I. Barnes, 30, wife Madie, 27, and children Weldon, 12, Dorothy, 11, Rachel, 9, Ethel G., 6, Vera, 2, and Virginia R., 6 months.
  • Laura Benger
  • Ezekiel B. Braswell — Braswell Sanitary Cafe. in the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1120 East Nash, rented for $18/month, cafe proprietor Ezekiel Braswell, 38; wife Mary, 29, public school teacher; daughters Mary E., 5, and Parthenia, 3; and roomer Matilda Cherry, 26, public school teacher.
  • George Cooper — Cooper & Barnes.
  • Peter Lupe
  • Rachel Gilliam

Central Cafe, Starr Cafe and Wilson Cafe served an African-American clientele, but were owned and operated by Mike Vekrakos, Gus Gliarmis and Major M. Gartrell. Vekrakos and Gliarmis were Greek immigrants, a group that dominated the cafe business in Wilson.

Cuts and cooks.

African-Americans dominated certain trades in early twentieth-century Wilson, including barbering and operating eating houses. Here, in their entireties, are the entries for these vocations in the 1908 Wilson city directory. “Colored” people were designated with asterisks.

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  • James Austin — In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 506 Green Street, railroad laborer James Austin, 54; wife Martha, 49, washing and ironing; cousin Neicy Edmundson, 39, cook; and son Charles Austin, 23. In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: 507 East Green, widower James Austin, 61, cousin Mac Edmonson, 37, niece Annie Wright, 35, and great-niece Dorthy Brown, 5.
  • S.W. Barnes —Short William Barnes was a carpenter. However, in the 1910 census of  Wilson, Wilson County: Short Barnes, 50, wife Frances, 50, daughter Maggie, 16, and boarder Mark Ellis, 25. Maggie was a barber and Mark, a minister.
  • Jno. Blount — On 4 March 1886, John Blount, 24, married Jane Bryant, 21, at Caroline Vick‘s house in Wilson. Witnesses were Caroline Vick, Julius Watkins and Bettie Rountree. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber John Blount, 48, wife Mary J., 44, and son Walter, 9. John Blount died 29 October 1917 in Wilson. He had been born in 1863 in Greene County to Right and H. Blount. Informant was J.M. Blount.
  • Wm. Hines — William Hines.
  • Henry C. Holden — On 4 January 1904, Henry C. Holden, 23, son of Wm. and H. Holden, married Lila Tomlin, 19, daughter of L[emon] and E. Tabron, at Edmonia Taborn‘s in Wilson. Baptist minister Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony. In the 1912 Wilson city directory, Henry C. Holden’s workplace was listed as Mayflower Barber Shop and his home address as “Daniel nr N S Ry.”  On 12 September 1918, Henry Clay Holden of 309 South Street, Wilson, registered for the World War I draft. He reported that he was born 15 April 1876, that he was a barber for Bill Hines at 119 South Tarboro Street, and that his nearest relative was his mother Hawkins Holden, who lived in Smithfield, Johnston County. In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Henry Holden, 43, and Virginia-born wife Mamie, 27, at 309 South Street.
  • Levi Jones — Levi Hunter Jones.
  • A.N. Neal — In the 1900 census of Freeman township, Franklin County: widower Austin Neal, 30, and children Bryant, 3, and Bertha, 1, plus brother Abram, 17, and sisters Tabitha, 19, and Bessie, 21. In the 1912 Wilson city directory, Austin Neal was listed as a barber at 409 East Nash. His home address was “Wainwright av for Freeman.” In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 105 Wainwright, widowed barber Austin Neal, 42, with children Bryant, 21, also a barber, Daisy, 16, Annie, 13, Samuel, 7, and Ruth, 5. In the 1930 census, Wilson, Wilson County: at 1214 Wainright Avenue, barber Austin Neal, 61, wife Lizzie, 38, servant for a private family, and son Samuel, 18, a hotel bell hop. Austin N. Neal died 14 February 1949 at Mercy Hospital of terminal uremia. He was born 11 November 1878 in Franklinton, North Carolina, to Abron Neal and Louise Brodie. He was buried in Rountree cemetery. Mrs. Lizzie H. Neal was informant.
  • Richard Renfrow — On 12 November 1895, Richard Renfrow, 35, son of Julia Gay, married Victoria Knight, 28, daughter of Harriet Knight in Wilson. W.T.H. Woodard performed the ceremony in the presence of Levi Jones, H.T. Ransom and Maggie Ransom. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Richard Renfrow, 38, wife Victora, 35, her mother Harriet Knight, 61, and Harriet’s grandchildren Hattie, 16, Andrew, 14, and Alis Knight, 12.
  • Tate & Hines — Noah John Tate and Walter Scott Hines. On 24 November 1904, Walter S. Hines applied for a marriage license for Noah J. Tate, 28, son of Hardy and Mary Tate, and Hattie Pearce, 20, daughter of Andrew and Alice Pearce. Baptist minister Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony at the home of Richard Renfrow in Wilson. Witnesses were S.H. Vick, W.H. Simms, and J.D. Reid. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Noah Tate, 28, wife Hattie, 24, and children John P., 3, and Helen, 2. (On one side of the family lived John Blount; on the other, Austin Neal.) Noah J. Tate of 307 North Pender Street, 50, died 3 January 1926 in Wilson of pulmonary tuberculosis. He was married to Hattie Tate and worked as a barber. He was born in Grimesland, North Carolina, to Hardy Tate of Wayne County and Mary Jane Dawson of Pitt County. He was buried in Rountree cemetery.
  • Sidney Wheeler — On 23 December 1896, Sidney Wheeler, 24, married Lou Armstrong, 20, in Wilson. Witnesses were Richard Renfrow, S.A. Smith, and Janie Booth. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Sidney Wheeler, 40; wife Lou, 30, cook; Sidney, 9, Dave, 7, Floyd, 4, and Emma, 2. On 8 March 1912, Sidney Wheeler of 710 Vance Street, age 35, died in Wilson of acute gastritis. Dr. W.A. Mitchner certified his death. He was born in Nash County to Richard and Annie Wheeler, and Lula Wheeler served as informant.

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  • Annie Best
  • Moses Bradon — Moses Brandon.
  • Manda Bynum — Wright Bynum married Amanda Hargrove on 2 January 1890. A.M.E. Zion minister J.H. Mattocks performed the ceremony, and O.L.W. Smith, John Ellis and Haywood Foreman stood as witnesses. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Wright Bynum, 37, servant, with wife Amanda, 30, and four lodgers, including Jonas Gay, 36.
  • Adelaide Farrell — Adelaide Farrell seems to have lived in Wilson only a short time. In the 1910 census of Snow Hill, Greene County: she was a 55 year-old widowed private cook listed in the household of her son-in-law and daughter, Allen and Mary Barfield. She may have been the Adelaide Farrell, 26, listed with husband Wesley and children in the 1880 census of Center, Chatham County, North Carolina.
  • Sarah Gaither — In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: day laborer Rufus Gaither, 57, wife Sarah, 56, and children Julius, 22, Mandy, 18, Aaron, 17, and Clarence, 15. In the 1912 Wilson city directory: Gaither Sarah eating house 418 e Nash h 401 Stantonsburg rd.
  • E.S. Hargrove — In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: widowed laundress Adeline Hargrove, 60, with sons Esau, 20, and Douglas Hargrove, 18, and two lodgers. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Vance Street, D. John Hargrove, 28, wife Vina, 25, and children D[illegible], 8, Willie, 6, Jacob, 4, and John Ben, 2, plus mother Adline, 50, brother Esias, 30, and niece Melia A., 15. In the 1912 Wilson city directory: Hargrove Esau S, gen mdse Viola nr Vick. On 20 July 1912, E.S. Hargrove, 40, married Annie Thomas, 20, in Wilson. In the 1930 census, at 803 Viola Street, Esis Hargrove, 51, wife Annie, 38, and children William, 15, and Maggie, 8. “Esis” was a Baptist clergyman and owned his home, valued at $2000.
  • J. Thomas Teachey — On 12 January 1880, James T. Teacher, 21, son of Andrew J. and Nancy J. Teacher, married Betsey J. Musgrove, 20, daughter of Hay’d and Penny Musgrove, at the Wayne County courthouse. In the 1900 census of Dudley, Wayne County: farmer James T. Teachie, 41, wife Betsey, 37, and children Jhon H.M., 19, Lu V.J., 17, Hareward T., 15, Ann L.J., 13, Betsey J., 10, Julia A., 6, Louis J.E., 3, Susan A.L.B., 11 months. In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Nash Road, house carpenter James Teachee, 53, wife Betsey, 48, and children Haywood, 22, Julia, 18, Louis J., 14, Susie L., 12, and Chas., 10; plus Garfield Granton, 30, Betsey, 23, and son John, 2.  James Thomas Teachey died 27 December 1944 in Wilson, probably of a heart attack. He was a widower and had worked as a contractor and builder. He was 86 years old and had been born in Duplin County to Nancy Teachey. He was buried at Rountree cemetery. Daughter Luvicy Wynn, who resided at 402 North Vick with Teachey, was informant.
  • Sidney Wheeler — Wheeler had a finger in many pots. See above.
  • Isaac Whittaker — In the 1912 Wilson city directory, Isaac Whitaker operated an eating house at 504 Smith Street. Issac Whitaker, single, died 29 April 1915 in Wilson. He was 70 years old and worked as a cook. Leah Whitaker of Enfield, North Carolina, reported that Isaac was the son of Bob and Clara Whitaker.  He was buried in Enfield.

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Sanborn Fire Map of Wilson, N.C., 1908.

 (Click to enlarge.) In eating houses in red: (1) Annie Best, 121 South Goldsboro; (2) Moses Brandon, 127 South Goldsboro. Four other eating houses were three blocks southeast in the 400 block of Nash Street, which straddled the Atlantic Coastline Railroad. Barbershops in blue: (1) S.W. Barnes, 123 South Goldsboro; (2) Richard Renfrow, 126 South Goldsboro, (3) A.N. Neal, 109 East Nash; (4) Henry C. Holden, Branch Bank, 125 East Nash; (5) Tate & Hines, New Briggs Hotel, 209 East Nash Street; (6) Levi Jones, 105 North Goldsboro; (7) William Hines, 119 South Tarboro.

All census and vital records found at http://www.ancestry.com.

The death of Moses Brandon.

Victim of Heart Failure.

Moses Brandon, a negro, fell dead today at 2:15 from heart failure.

The negro, it appears, was walking on Spring street, opposite the Norfolk Southern cotton platform, when suddenly he threw up his hands and fell to the ground. Smith Bennett, another negro who lived nearby, saw him and ran to his assistance. He saw though that Brandon was dying and ran to get a chair. Brandon died in a few minutes.

The deceased had conducted a restaurant in this city for a great many years and is one of Wilson’s best known colored citizens.   — Wilson Daily Times, 4 March 1914.

——

Moses Brandon, son of Frances Terry of Virginia, married Amie Hilliard on 22 May 1895 in Wilson. A.M.E. Zion minister L.B. Williams performed the ceremony, and Charles H. Darden, Braswell R. Winstead and L.A. Moore served as witnesses.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Virginia-born Moses Brandon, 50, day laborer; wife Emmie, 45, washerwoman; and son Marvin, 12. (Smith Bennett, 47, a brickmason, and his daughter Addie, 2o, also appear in the Wilson census.)

In the 1908 Wilson city directory, Moses Brandon’s listing shows his “eating house” at 127 South Goldsboro Street and his home at 125 Ashe.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Moses Brandon, 55, proprietor of boarding house, and wife Amy, 51, laundress. Her only child was reported dead.

In the 1912 Wilson city directory, Moses Brandon’s listing shows his eating house at 411 East Nash and his home at 127 Ashe.

Page_11) 127 E. Goldsboro. 2) 411 E. Nash. 3) 125-127 Ashe. 4) N&S cotton platform, Spring Street. Sanborn map of Wilson NC, 1913.

Brandon died intestate. Two months after his death, his widow Amy applied for letters of administration for his estate, valued at $300. Camillus L. Darden (son of Charles L. Darden, above) and Roderick Taylor joined her to give a $600 bond.

M Brandon Admin Bond

Amy Brandon did not long outlive her husband. The will she drew up in September 1916 was proved six months later:

North Carolina, Wilson County.   I, Amy Brandon, a colored woman, of the state of North Carolina and county of Wilson, being of sound mind and memory but considering the uncertainty of this my earthly existence and wishing to arrange for the proper handling of my affairs and the distribution of my property in the event of my death, do make, publish, and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

First: my executor, hereinafter named and designated, shall give my body a decent burial, suitable to the wishes of my relatives. And it is my desire that my said executor have my body interred in the burial ground at Wilson, North Carolina.

I direct my said executor to pay all my funeral expenses and all my just debts out of the first moneys coming into his hands from my said estate.

Second: I give, bequeath and devise to my beloved and only sister, Lucinda Holloway, now living and residing at No. 624 Princess Anne Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia, all my property, real and personal, of whatsoever kind and condition and wheresoever situate, to her and her heirs and assigns, in fee simple forever.

Third: I hereby nominate, constitute and appoint, Camillus Darden, a colored man of Wilson, North Carolina, a friend of myself and family, my lawful executor, to all intents and purposes to execute this my last will and testament and every part and clause thereof according to the true intent and meaning of the same, hereby revoking and declaring void all other wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

In Testimony Whereof, I, the said Amy Brandon, have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal, this the 8th day of September, 1916.     Amy (X) Brandon  {seal}

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said Amy Brandon to be her last will and testament in the presence of us, who at her request and in her presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses thereto.    Witnesses: /s/ D.C. Yancey, Ph.G., L.A. Moore