family portrait

The children and grandchildren of Frank and Elna Farmer Hooker.

Hooker family reunion, Wilson, 1947. “L. to R. 1st Row: Catherine, Alice, Frankie. 2nd Row: Dewey, Montez, Theodore, Inez, Clementine. 3rd Row: Gray, Bernice, Sylvester. Steps: Elynore, Merida, Steven, William.” 

——

On 26 December 1900, Frank Hooker, 26, of Wilson County, married Elner T. Farmer, 24, of Wilson County, daughter of Gray and Argent Farmer, in Wilson. W.H. Kittrell applied for the license, and Rev. C[larence]. Dillard, Presbyterian, performed the ceremony in the presence of S.H. Vick and J.T. Harper of Wilson and Daisy Dillard of Goldsboro.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Manchester Street, Frank Hooker, 57 [sic], wood sawyer; wife Ella, 33; and children Emma R., 8, Grey, 6, Clarence D., 4, and Argent, [age illegible.]

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 656 Viola Street, Frank Hooker, 47, woodyard sawyer; wife Elinor, 37, sewing woman; and children Ruth, 17, Gray, 14, Henry, 12, Inez, 19, Irmadeen, 7, Sylvester, 4, and Theodore, 2.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 717 Green Street, Ellen Hooker, 47, widowed teacher; children Ruth, 25, Cilvesta, 14, and Theodo, 11; and grandchildren Montez, 8, and Clementine, 6.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 708 Green Street, Eleanor Hooker, 59, widowed teacher; daughter Inez, 27, cook; and roomer Willie Boykin, 35, bricklayer, of Lawrenceville, Virginia.

Photo courtesy of History of Wilson County, North Carolina (1985).

Joseph S. Jackson family.

Joseph S. Jackson, Annie Horton Jackson, and children John Burns, Mary Elsie, Paul and Joseph S. Jackson Jr., 1920.

Joe Jackson came to Wilson about 1890. He went to work for Charles Fleming at Imperial Tobacco Company, where he eventually became foreman. The Episcopal church was across the street, and Jackson took night classes to learn to read and write and to study music with Rev. Perry (first name not stated).

After additional study, Jackson was ordained a minister in the A.M.E. Zion church.

In 1895, Jackson married Annie Horton of Smithfield, Johnston County, North Carolina. The family made its home at 618 East Green Street, and four of seven children lived to adulthood.

Mary Elise Jackson, born 1901, attended Wilson Graded School, Claflin College and Livingston College. She taught in High Point, N.C., until she married Dr. Leroy H. Jenkins, a dentist, and settled in Philadelphia.

Joseph Sylvester Jackson Jr., born 1904, attended Wilson schools, Livingstone College, New York University and University of Chicago.

Paul Jackson, born 1907, attended Wilson schools, Livingstone College, University of Pennsylvania and Temple University.

John Burns Jackson, born 1910, attended Wilson schools and Livingstone College. He worked for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance in Goldsboro, N.C., before migrating to Maryland.

Joseph Jackson Sr. died in 1942, and Annie H. Jackson in 1962.

——

On 27 December 1894, Joseph Jackson, 22, of Wilson, son of Andrew and Rosa Ann Jackson of Granville County, married Annie L. Horton, 20, of Johnston County, daughter of Samuel Horton and Mary J. Woods.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: teamster Joseph Jackson, 27; wife Annie L., 25; and son Joseph, 1.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Joseph Jackson, 37, minister; wife Annie, 45; and children Eloise, 8, Joseph, 5, Paul L., 2, and John, 2 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Green Street, Joseph S. Jackson, 48, minister; wife Annie H., 45; and children Mary E., 18, Joseph S., Jr., 15, Paul L., 11, and John B., 9.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 618 Green Street, valued at $8000, Joseph H. Jackson, 60, preacher; wife Annie H., 54; and boarder Bettie Marten, 54, widowed cook.

In the 1930 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 2346 North 25th Street, Leroy Jenkins, 33, doctor of dentistry; wife Mary E., 28; and brother Augustus Jenkins, 21, inspector at automobile works.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 618 Green Street, valued at $3000, fruit store owner Joe Jackson, 73, born in Oxford, and wife Annie, 71, born in Smithfield.

Joseph Sylvester Jackson died 22 October 1942 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 16 September 1870 in Granville County, North Carolina, to John Jackson; was married to Annie Jackson; resided at 618 East Green Street; was a laborer and merchant; and was buried in Rountree cemetery.

Text adapted from article in and photo courtesy of History of Wilson County, North Carolina (1985).

The Samuel H. and Annie W. Vick family.

This handsome portrait captures members of the extended family of Samuel H. and Annie Washington Vick and appears to have been taken on the porch of their home at 622 East Green Street circa 1905. Vick is seated center left, looking off into the distance. The man and woman flanking him may be his parents, Daniel and Fannie Blount Vick. The boys are likely, from left, sons George White Vick (born 1902), Samuel W. Vick (1900), and Daniel L. Vick (1897). The little girl may be daughter Viola Vick, who was born after 1900 and died prior to the 1910 census. Eldest daughter Elba Louise Vick Valle (1893) may be the girl standing third from right. The men standing may be Samuel Vick’s brothers Ernest Linwood (1867), William Henry (1871), and James Oscar F. Vick (1872). The women standing are likely wives of the Vick brothers. Annie Vick appears to be the woman in the white blouse.

Photograph courtesy of booklet commemorating the dedication in 2013 of the Samuel H. Vick Historic Marker, sponsored by Wilson County Historical Association. Corrections to the identification of members of the Vick family are welcomed.

The Edward and Cora Brantley Locus family.

This portrait of family members gathered for the funeral of  Edward Locus (also known as Edward Lucas) was taken in 1947 in Taylor township, Wilson County.

Front: Edward Locus’s grandson L.J. Lucas First row: children Quentin Lucas (1920-??), Lottie Lucas McKinnon (1925-1978), Kennie Lucas (1924-??), Winnie Locus Rankin (1915-1961), John Edd Locus (1918-??), Nancy Locus Farmer (1930-1973), and Frank Locus (1928-2001). Back row: daughters Redelphia Locus Pone (1916-2000), Ella Lucas (1916-??), Maggie Lucas Dew (1914-1992), widow Cora Brantley Locus (circa 1892-1962), and sister Dora Locus Battle (1872-1960).

——

On 19 July 1906, Ed Lucas, 21, of Wilson County, son of John and Delphy Lucas, married Cora Brantley, 18, of Nash County, daughter of Margaret Lucas, in Nash County.

In the 1920 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farmer Edward Locus, 37; wife Cora, 27; and children Linwood, 10, Maggie, 9, Beulah, 8, Winnie, 6, Chicken, 4, Delphy, 3, John Ed., 1, and Quinton, 6 months.

In the 1930 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farmer Ed Locus, 47; wife Cora, 35; and children Linward, 20, Maggie, 19, Ula, 18, Winnie, 17, Alma, 16, Redelpha, 13, John E., 11, Clinton, 10, Kenny, 9, Josephine, 7, Easter, 5, Louise, 4, Frank, 3, and Nancy, an infant.

In the 1940 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farm laborer Ed Locus, 55; wife Clara, 45; and children Ella, 26, Redelphine, 23, Jhonnie Ed, 21, Qunnion, 19, Kerney, 18, Jasperine, 17, Lottie and Louise, 15, Frank, 12, and Nancy, 10.

Eddie Lucas died 14 June 1947 in Taylor township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 17 October 1883 in Wilson County to John Locus and Louise Howard; was married to Cora Lucas; worked as a farmer; and was buried in the Lucas family cemetery, Wilson County.

Photograph courtesy of Locus/Lucas family historian Europe A. Farmer.

Emiline Woodard and children.

Chester, Mary Adell, Emiline and Marvin Woodard, circa 1920.

In the 1920 census of Speights Bridge township, Greene County, North Carolina: on Harris Chapel-Howell Swamp Road, Johnnie Woodard, 28; wife Emma Line, 29; and children Marvin, 6, Chester B., 4, and Mary Adell, 21 months.

In the 1930 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Johnie Woodard, 47; wife Emma L., 47; and children Marvin, 18, Chester, 16, Adell, 14, Vernell L., 12, James, 10, and Thomas W., 6; plus lodger John McCory, 28.

In the 1940 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: Emiline Woodard, 48; and children Marvin, 16, Chester, 24, Mary, 21, Vornal, 19, Junious, 15, Helen G., 9, Bennie J., 6, and Thurman, 12.

Emiline Edwards Woodard died 15 April 1971 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 20 December 1894 to a mother named Hagar and an unknown father and was a widow. Informant was Mrs. Mary W. Moore, 1008 Washington Street.

Photograph courtesy of the family history booklet, Our Heritage 1812-1996: Edwards, Evans, Woodard, published in 1996, and graciously shared by B.J. Woodard.

Studio shots, no. 15: Redden Sanders Wilkins and family.

reddin-s-wilkins

Redden S. Wilkins and daughters Hattie Margaret and Mary Della.

Redden S. Wilkins, 28, of Wilson, and Mary Blount, 31, of Wilson, were married 20 January 1889 by Methodist minister J.H. Mattocks at Peter Rountree‘s in Wilson. Witnesses were Samuel B. Parker and Samuel H. Vick of Wilson and W.E. Palmer of Washington D.C. [Mary Blount may have been a close relative of Samuel Vick, whose mother was Fannie Blount Vick.]

In May 1897, the Wilkinses, who were living in a house owned by Samuel Vick’s father Daniel Vick, suffered a devastating house fire.

wa-520-1897

Wilson Times, 20 May 1897.

wdt-5-21-1897

Wilson Advance, 21 May 1897.

As posted here, Mary Wilkins, 43, died 27 March 1899, of an “internal tumor.” Undertaker Wootten & Stevens’ register notes that “Mary was wife of Redmond Wilkins, was in bad health for a long time, was a good woman.” She was buried in the “colored cemetery.”

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: teamster Redding Wilkins, 35, a widower, and his widowed mother Iserbella Battle, 85. [His children were not listed in the household.]

On 28 January 1903, Redden S. Wilkins, 33, of Wilson, married Mary [Hines] Boddie, 26, of Edgecombe County, at Haret Hines’ in Township No. 14, Edgecombe County. Witnesses were E.L. Reid, A.S. Henderson and John A. Gaston, all of Wilson.

The 1908 Wilson city directory lists Redmond Wilkins, laborer, at 414 South Lodge Street.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at Lodge Street, Redmond Wilkins, 42, odd jobs laborer; wife Mary, 35; and daughters Hallie, 4, Mary B., 23, a cook, and Isabell, 1. [Mary B. was Redden’s daughter with Mary Blount Wilkins. Hallie and Isabell, in fact, were named Hattie Margaret and Mary Della.]

Redden S. Wilkins died 7 October 1915 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was found dead of a lung hemorrhage. He was born in 1861 in Edgecombe County to Ephram Wilkins and Margaret Battle, both of Edgecombe; was married; and worked as a drayman. Mary Wilkins was informant. Per findagrave.com, he was buried in Hines/Bullock cemetery (his second wife’s family graveyard), near Pinetops, Edgecombe County.

On 6 November, Mary Wilkins applied in Wilson County Superior Court for letters of administration for his estate. She listed his assets as a house and lot valued at about $800.00, money in the bank at $145.00, and house and kitchen furniture at $50.00. As heirs at law, she listed only herself and her daughters, though at least one of her step-daughters — Redden’s oldest child, Lula Wilkins Brown — was living.

004778517_00361-1

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 507 Vance Street, widow Mary Wilkins, 45, cook, and daughters Margaret, 13, and Della, 10.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 506 Vance Street, rented for $12/month, cook Mary Wilkins, 47; daughter Della Mary, 18; lodgers Ethel Adkins, 20, a divorced teacher, and Henretta Smith, 53, widow; and nephew Paul Bullock, 21.

On 5 July 1932, Hattie M. Wilkins of Detroit, 24, born in North Carolina to Reden Wilkins and Mary Hines, married Abraham Butler of Detroit, 28, born in South Carolina, a factory worker.

In the 1940 census of Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois: physician Urbane F. Bass, 30, a native of Virginia, and wife Mary Della, 28, a North Carolina native. Urbane reported that he had been living in Saint Louis in 1935; Mary Della, in Wilson, North Carolina. [Urbane was the son of Dr. Urbane Francis Bass Sr., an African-American doctor and first lieutenant in the United States Army who was posthumously  awarded the Distinguished Service Award for his actions in World War I. See also entry for “Urbane Francis Bass” in W. Douglas Fisher and Joann H. Buckley, African American Doctors of World War I: The Lives of 104 Volunteerswhich touches upon Urbane Jr.’s practice in Cairo, which he abandoned several years after his and Mary Della’s home was firebombed in 1952 by segregationists. The family relocated to Los Angeles.]

In the 1940 census of Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan: at 1505 Labelle, Abraham Butler, 37, auto plant laborer; wife Hattie, 34; children Gibson, 6, Mary, 4, and Hattie, 2; and mother Josephine Butler, 69.

Per findagrave.com, Mary Della Wilkins Bass, born 2 February 1909, died 10 February 1988. She was buried in Rest Haven cemetery, Wilson.

Per the U.S. Social Security Applications and Claims Index, available at http://www.ancestry.com, Hattie Margaret Wilkins Butler Franklin, daughter of Redden Wilkins and Mary Ann Hines and born 9 March 1906 in Wilson, North Carolina, died in August 1993 in Highland Park, Wayne County, Michigan.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user laviemsvie.

——

[Personal note: for a brief period in the spring of 1998, I corresponded prolifically with Deborah Moore Vles, a descendant of Redden S. Wilkins and his first wife, Nelly Bynum Wilkins. Deborah shared with transcripts of letters Redden wrote in 1912 and 1915 to his eldest daughter, Lula Wilkins Brown — his “dear baby” — who had left Wilson for Missouri before 1910. In the letters, tender testaments to a father’s love for his child, Redden asks about his grandchildren, frets about his failing health and laments the distances between their far-flung relatives. I have been unable to find current contact information for Deborah and hope that she will somehow find this post. — LYH]

Studio shots, no. 13 & 14: Rufus and Sara Sherard Coley.

This beautiful matching set of photographic portraits depicts Rufus and Sara Sherard Coley.

rufus-coley

sarah-s-coley

On 28 November 1912, Rufus Coley, 29, of Wayne County, son of Dennis and Sarah Coley, married Sarah Sherard, 28, daughter of Swinson and Laura Sherard, in Fork township, Wayne County.

In the 1916 Wilson city directory, Rufus Coley is listed as a carpenter living on Atlantic Street between North Vick and Reid Streets.

Rufus Coley registered for the World War I draft on 12 September 1918. Per his registration card, he was born 6 September 1883; resided at R.F.D.#4, Wilson; was engaged in farming for John R. Raines; and his nearest relative was Sarah E. Coley.

Rufus Coley died 5 April 1925 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born about 1886 in Wayne County to Dennis Coley and Sarah Hill; was married to Sara Coley; worked as a bank manager at First National Bank; and was buried in Wayne County. Levi Coley of Goldsboro, North Carolina, was informant. [Bank manager? First National Bank? Was this a later iteration of Commercial Bank?]

Rufus Coley died intestate, and his wife Sara E. Coley applied in Wilson County Superior Court for letters of administration on 8 June 1925. She estimated his estate as a house and lot valued at about $1200.00 and personal property worth an additional $550.00, and named as heirs herself and children Elaine and James F. Coley. William Hines joined her in pledging bond.

007639926_00337

Just over a year later, on 18 July 1926, Sarah E. Coley died in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 25 March 1883 in Wayne County to Swinson Sherrood and Laura Hooks, both of Wayne. She was the widow of Rufus Coley and resided at 1012 East Atlantic Street, Wilson. John Sherrood was informant.

screen-shot-2016-12-30-at-7-53-50-pm

Sara E. S. Coley and children Elaine (born 1916) and James Frederick Coley (born 1921).

Photographs courtesy of Ancestry.com user lambie04. 

Studio shots, no. 12: John and Florence Miller Bynum family.

john-edw-bynum-1924

James, John Edward, Florence Roberta, and Johnny L. Bynum, circa 1924.

On 15 November 1914, John Bynum, 27, of Saratoga married Florence Miller, 19, of Saratoga in Stantonsburg township. Witnesses were Ora L. Barnes, Bert B. Person, and Anna S. Whitley, all of Stantonsburg township.

On 5 June 1917, John Bynum registered for the World War I draft at Saratoga precinct, Wilson County. Per his registration card: he was born 17 June 1888; worked as a farmer for L.P. Woodard; and had a wife and child. He was tall and of medium build, with dark brown eyes and black hair.

In the 1920 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farm laborer John Bynum, 30, wife Florance, 21, sons James, 3, and John, 7 months, and brother Walter Bynum, 24.

In the 1930 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farmer John Bynum, 42, wife Florance, 32, and sons James, 13, Jonnie, 10, and Hollie, 5.

In the 1940 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farmer John Bynum, 52, wife Florence, 45, and children James, 23, Johnie L., 20, Harley, 15, and Marguerite, 5, daughter-in-law Gladys, 22, and grandchildren James Jr., 2, and Geraldine, 10 months.

John Bynum died 23 June 1949 at his home at 1004 Robertson Street, Wilson. Per his death certificate: he was born 17 June 1887 in Wilson County to Abaraham Bynum and Jane Atkinson. Florence Bynum was informant.

Photograph courtesy of Ancestry.com user copl01.

Harry and Pet Sharp family portrait.

Like thousands of North Carolinians, Harry and Pet Sharp left Wilson County for better opportunities. However, unlike most African-American migrants, they headed south. A clue to their unusual movement is found in the 1900 census of Tatnall County, in which Harry’s occupation was listed as woods rider. A woods rider was a foreman on horseback who oversaw the rough labors of the turpentine workers moving on foot through brutally hot, rattlesnake-infested forests, “dipping” pine gum. With eastern North Carolina’s longleaf pines bled to ruin, its large and lucrative naval stores industry shifted southward to Georgia and Florida, with displaced workers in its wake. The Sharps were among them.

This Sharp family portrait was probably taken about 1900 in Georgia.

harry-pet-sharp-per-lavoniarcarter

——

In the 1870 census of Otter Creek, Edgecombe County, North Carolina: Gustin Sharp, 51, wife Bithy, 54, and children Lisha, 16, Harry 12, and Amanda, 10.

In the 1880 census of Auters Creek, Edgecombe County: Gustin Sharp, 63, wife Bythy, 65, and children or grandchildren Sarah, 18, Harry, 23, and Green, 15.

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Nelson Farmer, 30, wife Rose, 45, children Pett, 10, and Luke, 6, nieces Jimmie Ann, 14, and Lou, 10, and Rose’s children Daniel, 21, Lear, 18, and Jef, 16.

On 30 January 1889, H.H. Sharp, 31, of Wilson, married Pett Farmer, 19, of Wilson, at G.S Sharp’s in Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister J.T.Clark performed the ceremony before B.R. Winstead, William Connor and John Hardy.

In the 1900 census of Lyons, Tattnall County, Georgia: woods rider Harry Sharpe, 38, wife Pet, 30, and children Rena, 10, Lela, 8, Jessie, 5, Menar, 5, Cora, 2, and Mittie, 5 months. Rena was born in North Carolina; the remaining children in Georgia.

In the 1910 census of Toombs County, Georgia: farmer Harry H. Sharpe, 53, wife Pet, 40, and children Rena, 21, Jessie, 17, Mena, 13, Cora, 12, James, 9, David, 8, Harry, 6, Green, 4, and Caesar, 2 months.

Harry Sharp died in 1917, and Pet Farmer Sharp died in 1945, both in Toombs County, Georgia.

Photograph courtesy of Ancestry.com user lavoniarcarter.

Simms family portrait.

john-leslie-simms

Gertrude Simms Hoskins (1904-1988), Hannah Malinda Smith Simms (1876-1961), John Leslie Simms Jr. (1910-1982), Marcellus Simms (1900-1946), Jeanette Simms Bonner (1907-1999), John Leslie Simms (1867-1942), Rosetta Simms Campbell (1909-2001), Ashley Augustus Simms (1898-1977), Benjamin Frank Simms (1903-1980), circa 1910. 

——

In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Caroline Simms, 38, and children Harriet, 14, and John, 4.

screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-7-48-47-pm

Caroline Smith Simms (1832-1928).

On 25 January 1872, Warren Simms, son of Jack Anderson and Rebecca Simms, married Caroline Smith, daughter of Morton Smith and Charlotte Smith, at the Wilson County courthouse. [Note: Not uncommonly, Caroline used both Simms and Smith as maiden names. Her brother, Simon Simms, married Emeline Brooks on 16 January 1869 in Wilson County. His license lists his parents as Martin Simms and Charlotte Simms.]

In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Warren Simms, 25, wife Caroline, 47, step-daughter Harriet, 20, step-son John, 12, and children Zanah Ann, 9, and Lucy, 1, plus [Caroline’s] grandsons Ellis, 4, and Amanuel, 2.

On 7 February 1894, John L. Smith [alias Simms] married Lyndy Smith in Wayne County.

In the 1900 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer John Simms, 33, wife Malinda, 23, and son Ashley, 1.

In the 1910 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer John Simms, 43, wife Melinda, 37, and children Ashley, 10, Marcellus, 8, Frank, 7, Gertrude, 6, Jennette, 4, and Rosettie, 1.

On 4 December 1928, Carolina Simms died in Pine Level township, Johnston County. Her death certificate reports that she was born in 1822 to unknown parents in Johnston County.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: John Simms, 63, wife Milindy, 54, and children Jenette, 23, Rosetta, 20, Johnnie, 18, Paul, 16, Julia, 13, and Mary, 12.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: John Simms, 78, wife Melanie, 65, and children and grandchildren John Simms, 29, Paul Simms, 26, Mary L. Simms, 21, Cleo Bonner, 8, and Jesse, 6, Willie, 5, and Else Simms, 5.

John Simms died 15 December 1942 in Wilson township, Wilson County. His death certificate indicates that he was born 9 October 1867 in Wilson County to Curtis Simms and Caroline (last name unknown), that he was married to Malinda Simms; and that he was buried in Rountree cemetery near Wilson. Marcellus Simms was the informant.

Hannah Malinda Simms died 28 March 1961 in Wilson, North Carolina. Her death certificate indicates that she was born 15 August 1880 in Wayne County to Minerva Smith and an unknown father. She was buried in Rest Haven cemetery. Jeanette Bonner was informant.

Photos courtesy of Ancestry.com member brianandrewbonner.