Jackson

Jackson buys from the Vicks.

In 1902, Samuel H. and Annie M. Vick sold Joseph S. Jackson a narrow strip of land lying between Jackson’s lot at 618 East Green Street and the Vicks’ lot.

The Jacksons’ two-story house at 618 East Green Street, shown here on the 1922 Sanborn map of Wilson, no longer stands.

It was replaced relatively recently by this small gable-front house:

Book 68, page 551, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson County Courthouse.

Mary Elise Jackson Jenkins of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Like her brother Paul L. Jackson, Mary Elise Jackson Jenkins migrated from Wilson to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Toward the end of her life, she was featured several times in Philadelphia Inquirer articles.

  • Art exhibit

Philadelphia Inquirer, 10 June 1983.

  • Education in the South

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Philadelphia Daily News, 17 February 1987.

The “very special block” was, of course, the 600 block of East Green Street, home to the Vicks, the Hines/Barnes family, the Hargraves, the Reids, and other striving East Wilsonians. However, Claflin University (then College) was an unusual choice for a Wilson family. I have not been able to determine who the “girl from my home” was.

  • The Great Migration

Elise Jenkins contributed keepsakes to “Let This Be Your Home,” a year-long exhibit at Philadelphia’s Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum [now the African American Museum] chronicling the lives of “the new Philadelphians” who arrived in the city as part of the Great Migration.

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Philadelphia Inquirer, 13 February 1990.

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In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Joseph Jackson, 37, minister; wife Annie, 45; and children Eloise, 8, Joseph, 5, Paul L., 2, and John, 2 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Green Street, Joseph S. Jackson, 48, minister; wife Annie H., 45; and children Mary E., 18, Joseph S., Jr., 15, Paul L., 11, and John B., 9.

On 18 August 1926, Leroy H. Jenkins, of Philadelphia, son of John and Molie Jenkins, married Mary Eleis Jackson, 25, in Wilson. A.M.E. Zion minister J.S. Jackson performed the ceremony in the presence of C.L. Darden, C.S. Thomas and H.S. Stanback.

In the 1930 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 2346 North 25th Street, owned and valued at $2900, South Carolina-born Leroy Jenkins, 33, a doctor of dentistry; North Carolina-born wife Elise, 28; and brother Augustus, 21, automobile works inspector.

In the 1940 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 2351 West Haggart, owned and valued at $3000, dentist Leroy H. Jenkins, 42; wife Elise, 39; and children Leroy, 8, and Anne, 5.

Mary Elise Jackson Jenkins died 6 May 1990 in Philadelphia.

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Philadelphia Inquirer, 8 May 1990.

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M. Elise Jackson Jenkins (1901-1990).

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user GusJenkins.

Joseph S. Jackson family.

Joseph S. Jackson, Annie Horton Jackson, and children John Burns, Mary Elise, Paul and Joseph S. Jackson Jr., 1920.

Joe Jackson came to Wilson about 1890. He went to work for Charles Fleming at Imperial Tobacco Company, where he eventually became foreman. The Episcopal church was across the street, and Jackson took night classes to learn to read and write and to study music with Rev. Perry (first name not stated).

After additional study, Jackson was ordained a minister in the A.M.E. Zion church.

In 1895, Jackson married Annie Horton of Smithfield, Johnston County, North Carolina. The family made its home at 618 East Green Street, and four of seven children lived to adulthood.

Mary Elise Jackson, born 1901, attended Wilson Graded School, Claflin College and Livingston College. She taught in High Point, N.C., until she married Dr. Leroy H. Jenkins, a dentist, and settled in Philadelphia.

Joseph Sylvester Jackson Jr., born 1904, attended Wilson schools, Livingstone College, New York University and University of Chicago.

Paul Jackson, born 1907, attended Wilson schools, Livingstone College, University of Pennsylvania and Temple University.

John Burns Jackson, born 1910, attended Wilson schools and Livingstone College. He worked for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance in Goldsboro, N.C., before migrating to Maryland.

Joseph Jackson Sr. died in 1942, and Annie H. Jackson in 1962.

Text adapted from article in and photo courtesy of History of Wilson County, North Carolina (1985).

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On 27 December 1894, Joseph Jackson, 22, of Wilson, son of Andrew and Rosa Ann Jackson of Granville County, married Annie L. Horton, 20, of Johnston County, daughter of Samuel Horton and Mary J. Woods.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: teamster Joseph Jackson, 27; wife Annie L., 25; and son Joseph, 1.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Joseph Jackson, 37, minister; wife Annie, 45; and children Eloise, 8, Joseph, 5, Paul L., 2, and John, 2 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Green Street, Joseph S. Jackson, 48, minister; wife Annie H., 45; and children Mary E., 18, Joseph S., Jr., 15, Paul L., 11, and John B., 9.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 618 Green Street, valued at $8000, Joseph H. Jackson, 60, preacher; wife Annie H., 54; and boarder Bettie Marten, 54, widowed cook.

In the 1930 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 2346 North 25th Street, Leroy Jenkins, 33, doctor of dentistry; wife Mary E., 28; and brother Augustus Jenkins, 21, inspector at automobile works.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 618 Green Street, valued at $3000, fruit store owner Joe Jackson, 73, born in Oxford, and wife Annie, 71, born in Smithfield.

Joseph Sylvester Jackson died 22 October 1942 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 16 September 1870 in Granville County, North Carolina, to John Jackson; was married to Annie Jackson; resided at 618 East Green Street; was a laborer and merchant; and was buried in Rountree cemetery.

 

“If I rest, I rust.”

From the 1927 Ell Cee, the yearbook of Livingstone College, Salisbury, North Carolina:

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From the 1928 Maple Leaf (as the yearbook was called the following year):

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More on Joseph Sylvester Jackson Jr. here.

(By the way, the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions was an organization founded in 1886 that sought to recruit college and university students in the United States for missionary service abroad. (Or, presumably, among Negroes.))

The obituary of Paul L. Jackson, Philadelphia dentist.

Dr. Paul L. Jackson G’33, Philadelphia, a retired assistant clinical professor at the Temple University School of Dentistry who had maintained a practice in West Philadelphia for 28 years; Jan. 17. Following discharge from the U.S. Army after service in the Second World War, he taught dentistry at Howard University in Washington before setting up practice in Philadelphia in 1947.

The Pennsylvania Gazette, July/August 2002.

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In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Joseph Jackson, 37, minister; wife Annie, 45; and children Eloise, 8, Joseph, 5, Paul L., 2, and John, 2 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Green Street, Joseph S. Jackson, 48, minister; wife Annie H., 45; and children Mary E., 18, Joseph S., Jr., 15, Paul L., 11, and John B., 9.

In the 1930 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 1304 Carpenter Street, North Carolina-born Paul Jackson, 23, laborer on wharves, listed as a nephew of Thomas and Louise Duncan.

In the 1940 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 5222 Race Street, Paul Jackson and wife Catherine, both public school teachers.

In 1950, Paul Jackson applied for bonus compensation paid by Pennsylvania to honorably discharged veterans. He identified Annie H. Jackson, 618 East Green Street, Wilson, as his only living parent.

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Paul Lawrence Jackson died 17 January 2002. On the 24th, the Philadelphia Inquirer ran his obituary:

Paul L. Jackson, 94, a dentist in West Philadelphia for 28 years, died last Thursday of pneumonia at Stapeley Hall, a retirement home in Germantown. 

Born and raised in Wilson, N.C., Dr. Jackson received a bachelor’s degree from Livingstone College in North Carolina. He received a master’s degree in zoology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1933. He received his dental degree from Temple University in 1943, and then served in the Army during World War II. 

After his discharge, he taught dentistry at Howard University in Washington before establishing a practice at his home in West Philadelphia in 1947. In addition to his private practice, Dr. Jackson was an assistant clinical professor at Temple University School of Dentistry. 

He was a member of the New Era Dental Society, the Philadelphia County and American Dental Associations, and the Omega Psi Phi and Chi Delta Mu fraternities. He was active in the Boy Scouts and was a former trustee of Alleyne Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church in West Philadelphia. 

He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Margaret Trummell Williams Jackson; his first wife, Catherine McCaine Jackson, to whom he was married for 56 years, died in 1990. 

A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. Feb. 9 at Stapeley Hall, 6300 Greene St. Burial arrangements are private. 

Joseph S. Jackson, Jr.

From Who’s Who in Colored America, 7th edition (1950) —

JACKSON, JOSEPH SYLVESTER, federal civil servant; b. Wilson, N.C., June 4, 1904; s. Joseph S. and Annie (Horton) Jackson (divorced). A.B. Livingston Coll., Salisbury, N.C., 1928; grad. study, New York Sch. of Soc. Work, 1928-29; U. of Washington, 1939; U. of Chicago, 1939-40. Exec. sec., Seattle (Wash.) Urban League 1930-1938; reviewer, tenant selection div., Chicago (Ill.) Housing Authority, 1940-42; adm. officer, rent div., O.P.A., Chicago, 1942-48; organizer and operation asst., office of Housing Expediter, 1948-present; mem. Am. Assn. Soc. Workers, Natl. Assn. Housing Officials, Natl. Urban League, N.A.A.C.P. Author: What To Tell Them, voc. guidance booklet for Seattle pub. schs., 1935. African Methodist Episcopal. Democrat. Business address: Temporary E. Bldg., 4th St. and Adams Drive, S.W., Washington D.C. Home address: 1712 16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C.

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From www.blackpast.org:

Joseph Sylvester Jackson became the first executive secretary of the newly founded Seattle Urban League when it received its charter from the national headquarters in New York in 1930.  Little is known about Jackson before 1928.  That year he graduated from Livingston College in Salisbury, North Carolina.  In September, 1928 he entered the New York School of Social Work as a Fellow of the National Urban League.  He also worked  briefly at the Brooklyn Urban League.   After arriving in Seattle from New York, Jackson quickly became a “one man professional staff,” and plunged the organization into working on a number of problems facing the city’s small black community at the beginning of the Great Depression.  In his first year Jackson initiated community health and recreation programs such as Negro Health Week, the Vocational Opportunity Program, and presentations to white and Asian groups about the League and black Seattle.  In 1931 Jackson organized a black branch of the Unemployed Citizen’s League and two years later, a secretarial school. Despite his busy schedule of Urban League activities, Jackson also took time to play the lead actor in the Seattle Negro Repertory Theater’s 1933 production of In Abraham’s Bosom at the Seattle Repertory Playhouse. Throughout the 1930s, Joseph S. Jackson accumulated statistics on the education, health and employment of black Seattle. In 1938 Jackson lead a public campaign to remove three Seattle police officers who were accused of causing the death of Berry Lawson, a hotel waiter.  Jackson’s investigation of the Lawson incident and his public challenge to officials to act in the matter led to the prosecution of the three officers.   On June 10, 1938, the three officers were convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to twenty years in prison. In 1939, Jackson left Seattle.

And here’s a link to a piece promoting Seattle that Jackson write for the Urban League’s Opportunity magazine.

And from an entry on a website chronicling the Great Depression in Washington State:

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In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Joseph Jackson, 37, minister; wife Annie, 45; and children Eloise, 8, Joseph, 5, Paul L., 2, and John, 2 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Green Street, Joseph S. Jackson, 48, minister; wife Annie H., 45; and children Mary E., 18, Joseph S., Jr., 15, Paul L., 11, and John B., 9.