Jackson

Fiftieth anniversary of First Baptist Church.

Wilson Daily Times, 18 September 1922. 

Was a memorial drinking fountain ever installed in front of the church? I do not recall ever seeing one. 

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  • “the late Rev. Jackson” — Rev. Andrew J. Jackson was founder of First Baptist Church, now known as Jackson Chapel First Missionary Baptist Church. 
  • Rev. J.A. Mebane — John Alexander Mebane, a native of Bertie County, lived in Wilson only briefly. In the 1922 Hill’s directory of the city: Mebane John A Rev (c) 308 Hackney

Rev. J.A. Mebane (1885-1974).

  • M.E. Rogers — Mary Elizabeth Rogers
  • John Battle — probably, John Parker Battle.
  • Henrietta Foster — Foster, who was listed as living at the rear of 308 Hackney Street in 1922, later married Rev. Mebane. Henrietta Foster Mebane died in 1950 and, though the Mebanes spent most of their married life in Tarboro, N.C., both are buried in Wilson’s Rest Haven Cemetery. Their daughter Grace Mebane, who died in Tarboro in 1940 at age 14, is also buried in Wilson.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user Satwun.

Lane Street Project: the Joseph S. Jackson family plot.

The deeply incised, irregular J’s of these granite cornerstones are unmistakably the work of Clarence B. Best. They, and a foot marker for Rev. Joseph S. Jackson, are all that remain of the Jackson family’s plot in Odd Fellows cemetery.

The grave of Jackson, a Baptist minister and tobacco factory foreman, may be the only one in the plot. Jackson’s children migrated North and West, and his wife died in Philadelphia in 1962. Annie H. Jackson’s Pennsylvania death certificate lists her place of burial simply as Wilson, N.C. However, by then Odd Fellows was in serious disrepair. She was buried in city-owned Rest Haven instead, and Rev. Jackson was disinterred and reburied beside her. When Joseph S. Jackson Jr. died in 1967, his body was returned to Wilson for burial in Rest Haven, too.

Where did they go?: Michigan World War II draft registrations, no. 3.

  • Southen Jones

In the 1940 census of Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan: on East Canfield, renting for $50/month, Southern Jones, 33, born in North Carolina, general work-W.P.A. project. He reported that he had been living in the same place in 1935.

Southen Jones registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 26 December 1906 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 1971 East Canfield, Detroit; his contact was friend Walter Dale; and he worked for W.P.A. He was described as Negro, 5’7″, 140 pounds, with brown eyes, black hair, dark brown skin, and a scar above his left eye.

  • Alphonza Jackson

Alphonza Jackson registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 9 June 1906 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 996 Ferry Avenue, Detroit; his contact was common-law wife Pearl Jackson; and he was unemployed. He was described as Negro, 5’9″, 184 pounds, with brown eyes, black hair, and dark skin.

  • Walter Dortch Hines

Walter Dortch Hines registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 17 July 1909 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 7068 Michigan, Detroit; his contact was mother Sara Elizabeth Hines, 617 East Green, Wilson; and he was a self-employed medical doctor. He was described as Negro, 5’10”, 154 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair, dark skin, and a scar on “dorsal aspect of left hand.”

  • Sead Abdulla (formerly Lonnie Bailey)

In the 1910 census of Oldfields township, Wilson County: farmer John D. Bailey, 42; wife Jeneva, 33; and children Rhoda, 15, Pearlie, 12, Mary L., 9, Lonnie, 8, Ora, 6, John T., 5, William H., 4, Melton P., 2, and Richard E., 1.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Saratoga Road, farm laborer Gilbert Vick, 29; wife Pearlie, 22; daughter Carrie Belle, 5; and brother-in-law Lonnie Bailey, 17.

Lonnie Bailey registered for the World War II draft in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 26 January 1902 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 1023 Illinois, Detroit; his contact was friend Geneva Bailey, 516 Church Street, Wilson; and he worked for Linwood Coal Company, Detroit. He was described as Negro, 5’9″, 165 pounds, with brown eyes, black hair, dark brown skin, and a scar on his left wrist. Via Probate Court, Bailey formally changed his name to Sead Abdulla on 1 June 1944. [His apparent conversion to Islam is the first I have seen for a Wilson County native, and it is reasonable to assume that he was a member of the Nation of Islam, founded in Detroit.]

Sead Abdullah died in February 1968 in Detroit.

  • Clifton Ray Hines

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Walter Hines, 50, wife Sarah, 48, and children Elizabeth, 21, Walter, 20, Carl W., 16, and Clifton R., 7.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 617 East Green, Walter S. Hines, 60; wife Sarah E., 58; son Carl W., 24, teacher; son’s wife Ruth, 23, teacher; and son Ray W. [sic], 17.

Clifton Ray Hines registered for the World War II draft in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 24 December 1922 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 7068 Michigan, Detroit [his brother Walter D. Hines’ home, see above]; his contact was mother Sarah Hines, 617 East Green Street, Wilson; and he worked for “Wayne Co. Rd. Comm. Traffic Census.” He was described as Negro, 5’7″, 140 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair, dark skin, and a scar on his left cheek.

Clifton Ray Hines died 11 September 1993 in Mayfield Heights, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. 

Jackson buys from the Vicks.

In 1902, Samuel H. and Annie M. Vick sold Joseph S. Jackson a narrow strip of land lying between Jackson’s lot at 618 East Green Street and the Vicks’ lot.

The Jacksons’ two-story house at 618 East Green Street, shown here on the 1922 Sanborn map of Wilson, no longer stands.

It was replaced relatively recently by this small gable-front house:

Book 68, page 551, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson County Courthouse.

Mary Elise Jackson Jenkins of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Like her brother Paul L. Jackson, Mary Elise Jackson Jenkins migrated from Wilson to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Toward the end of her life, she was featured several times in Philadelphia Inquirer articles.

  • Art exhibit

Philadelphia Inquirer, 10 June 1983.

  • Education in the South

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Philadelphia Daily News, 17 February 1987.

The “very special block” was, of course, the 600 block of East Green Street, home to the Vicks, the Hines/Barnes family, the Hargraves, the Reids, and other striving East Wilsonians. However, Claflin University (then College) was an unusual choice for a Wilson family. I have not been able to determine who the “girl from my home” was.

  • The Great Migration

Elise Jenkins contributed keepsakes to “Let This Be Your Home,” a year-long exhibit at Philadelphia’s Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum [now the African American Museum] chronicling the lives of “the new Philadelphians” who arrived in the city as part of the Great Migration.

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Philadelphia Inquirer, 13 February 1990.

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In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Joseph Jackson, 37, minister; wife Annie, 45; and children Eloise, 8, Joseph, 5, Paul L., 2, and John, 2 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Green Street, Joseph S. Jackson, 48, minister; wife Annie H., 45; and children Mary E., 18, Joseph S., Jr., 15, Paul L., 11, and John B., 9.

On 18 August 1926, Leroy H. Jenkins, of Philadelphia, son of John and Molie Jenkins, married Mary Eleis Jackson, 25, in Wilson. A.M.E. Zion minister J.S. Jackson performed the ceremony in the presence of C.L. Darden, C.S. Thomas and H.S. Stanback.

In the 1930 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 2346 North 25th Street, owned and valued at $2900, South Carolina-born Leroy Jenkins, 33, a doctor of dentistry; North Carolina-born wife Elise, 28; and brother Augustus, 21, automobile works inspector.

In the 1940 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 2351 West Haggart, owned and valued at $3000, dentist Leroy H. Jenkins, 42; wife Elise, 39; and children Leroy, 8, and Anne, 5.

Mary Elise Jackson Jenkins died 6 May 1990 in Philadelphia.

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Philadelphia Inquirer, 8 May 1990.

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M. Elise Jackson Jenkins (1901-1990).

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user GusJenkins.

Joseph S. and Annie H. Jackson family.

Joseph S. Jackson, Annie Horton Jackson, and children John Burns, Mary Elise, Paul and Joseph S. Jackson Jr., 1920.

Joe Jackson came to Wilson about 1890. He went to work for Charles Fleming at Imperial Tobacco Company, where he eventually became foreman. The Episcopal church was across the street, and Jackson took night classes to learn to read and write and to study music with Rev. Perry (first name not stated).

After additional study, Jackson was ordained a minister in the A.M.E. Zion church.

In 1895, Jackson married Annie Horton of Smithfield, Johnston County, North Carolina. The family made its home at 618 East Green Street, and four of seven children lived to adulthood.

Mary Elise Jackson, born 1901, attended Wilson Graded School, Claflin College and Livingston College. She taught in High Point, N.C., until she married Dr. Leroy H. Jenkins, a dentist, and settled in Philadelphia.

Joseph Sylvester Jackson Jr., born 1904, attended Wilson schools, Livingstone College, New York University and University of Chicago.

Paul Jackson, born 1907, attended Wilson schools, Livingstone College, University of Pennsylvania and Temple University.

John Burns Jackson, born 1910, attended Wilson schools and Livingstone College. He worked for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance in Goldsboro, N.C., before migrating to Maryland.

Joseph Jackson Sr. died in 1942, and Annie H. Jackson in 1962.

Text adapted from article in and photo courtesy of History of Wilson County, North Carolina (1985).

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On 27 December 1894, Joseph Jackson, 22, of Wilson, son of Andrew and Rosa Ann Jackson of Granville County, married Annie L. Horton, 20, of Johnston County, daughter of Samuel Horton and Mary J. Woods.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: teamster Joseph Jackson, 27; wife Annie L., 25; and son Joseph, 1.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Joseph Jackson, 37, minister; wife Annie, 45; and children Eloise, 8, Joseph, 5, Paul L., 2, and John, 2 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Green Street, Joseph S. Jackson, 48, minister; wife Annie H., 45; and children Mary E., 18, Joseph S., Jr., 15, Paul L., 11, and John B., 9.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 618 Green Street, valued at $8000, Joseph H. Jackson, 60, preacher; wife Annie H., 54; and boarder Bettie Marten, 54, widowed cook.

In the 1930 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 2346 North 25th Street, Leroy Jenkins, 33, doctor of dentistry; wife Mary E., 28; and brother Augustus Jenkins, 21, inspector at automobile works.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 618 Green Street, valued at $3000, fruit store owner Joe Jackson, 73, born in Oxford, and wife Annie, 71, born in Smithfield.

Joseph Sylvester Jackson died 22 October 1942 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 16 September 1870 in Granville County, North Carolina, to John Jackson; was married to Annie Jackson; resided at 618 East Green Street; was a laborer and merchant; and was buried in Rountree cemetery.

Anna Horton Jackson died 24 December 1962 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Per her death certificate, she was born 20 January 1872 in North Carolina to Mary Brooks; was a widow; and was buried in Wilson, N.C. Elise Jenkins was informant.

 

“If I rest, I rust.”

From the 1927 Ell Cee, the yearbook of Livingstone College, Salisbury, North Carolina:

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From the 1928 Maple Leaf (as the yearbook was called the following year):

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More on Joseph Sylvester Jackson Jr. here.

(By the way, the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions was an organization founded in 1886 that sought to recruit college and university students in the United States for missionary service abroad. (Or, presumably, among Negroes.))