Atlantic Street

918 Washington Street.

The ninety-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; bungalow with gable roof; engaged porch; asphalt veneer; built by carpenter Alonzo Coley.”

In the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barefoot Linwood propr Barefoot Pressing Wks h 918 Washington

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barefoot Lenwood (c; Bertha) tailor h 918 Washington

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barefoot Lenwood (c; Bertha) tailor Service Cleaning Wks h 918 Washington

William Alvis Barefoot died 22 February 1930 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 7 years old; was born in Wilson to Lenwood Barefoot and Bertha Moore, both of Wilson; lived at 918 Washington Avenue; and went to school.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 918 Washington Street, owned and valued at $6000, tailor Lenwood Barfoot, 33; wife Bertha, 32; and sons John L., 8, Stanley B., 5, Noris H., 4, Henry V., 2, and Kertise, 6 months.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Fisher Alonzo (c) porter h 918 Washington

In 1942, Alonza Garfield Fisher Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 3 May 1903 in Lenoir County, North Carolina; resided at 918 Washington, Wilson; his telephone number was 3820-1; his contact was Louis H. Fisher, Kinston, North Carolina; and he worked for the government in Railway Mail Services.

Notices of sheriff’s sale for 918 Washington appeared in the Wilson Daily Times in January and February 1946:

Wilson Daily Times, 5 February 1946.

However, when Alonzo G. Fisher Sr. died 13 August 1948, he was still living at the address. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 March 1883 in Lenoir County to James Fisher and Martha Jones; was the widower of Lanie Fisher; and had worked as a laborer. Alonzo G. Fisher, Jr., 918 Washington, was informant.

Alonza Garfield Fisher Jr. died 15 September 1949 at his home at 918 Washington Street. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 May 1903 in Lenoir County, North Carolina, to Alonza G. Fisher Sr. and Mollie Carr; was married; and worked as a railway mail clerk. Lewis Henry Fisher of Kinston was informant.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

1012 Atlantic Street.

The eighty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; gambrel-front house with two-bay facade; aluminum-sided.”

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: George Arthur H (c; Minnie B) pastor Calvary Presbyterian Ch h 1012 Atlantic.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1012 Atlantic Street carpenter/bricklayer Arthur J. George, wife Minnie, sons Arthur, Henry H., and Bryant George, lodger Rebacer Ramsy, and niece Willie L. George.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1012 Atlantic Avenue, rented for $12/month, tobacco factory janitor Bud Bryant, 52; wife Nancy, 48; nieces Louise, 17, Nannie, 15, Mary, 12, and Carleen Reid, 11; and son Frederick Reid, 34, divorced.

In 1940, Frederick Reid registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 September 1905 in Wilson; resided at 1012 Atlantic; his contact was mother Nancy Bryant, 1012 Atlantic; and he worked for W.B. Corbett, Waterworks Road, Wilson.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bryant Bud (c; Nancy) lab 1012 Atlantic Av.

Nancy Bryant died 14 January 1945 at her home at 1012 Atlantic Street. Per her death certificate, she was 53 years old; born in Wayne County to Zion and Eliza Reid; and was married to Rev. Mathew B. Bryant, age 56, who was informant.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

1113 Atlantic Street.

The forty-sixth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1922; 1 story; John Moore house; late example of double-pile hip-roofed form with projecting front wing; has classical porch posts; Moore was listed as both a barber and shoemaker.”

In the 1928 city directory of Wilson:

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: John H. Moore, 45, cobbler in a shoe shop; wife Annie, 31, laundress; and children Lena, 11, Carl, 9, John, 7, Anna G., Odessia B., and Ruth, 1.

In 1940, Carl Moore registered for the World War II draft in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Per his registration card, he was born 23 January 1919 in Wilson; resided at 1113 Atlantic Street, Wilson (formerly 1516 North Opal Street, Philadelphia, and 1750 North Croskey Street, Philadelphia); his contact was mother Armincie Moore, 1113 East Atlanta [sic] Street, Wilson; and he was unemployed.

In the 1941 city directory of Wilson, N.C.: Moore John H (c; Armincia; 4) shoe repr 517 E Nash h 1113 Atlantic Av

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, September 2017.

 

1004 Washington Street.

The forty-fourth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “circa 1930; 1 1/2 stories; James Whitfield house; bungalow with gable roof and shed dormer; aluminum sided; Whitfield was a house painter.”

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James Whitfield registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 26 March 1892 in Nash County; resided at 717 Stantonsburg; was a self-employed painter; had a wife and two children; and had sandy hair and brown eyes.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 715 Stantonsburg Street, house painter James Whitfield, 27; wife Lizzie, 25, hotel cook; children James Jr., 8, Lillian, 5, and Helen I., 5 months; and father Andrew Whitfield, 69.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1004 Washington Street, valued at $3000, building painter James Whitfield, 34; wife Lizzie, 31, laundress; children James Jr., 18, Lillian, 15, and Hellen, 12; and father Alleck Whitfield, 81.

James A. Whitfield Jr. died 17 December 1936 of “auto collision on U.S. 301 killing him instantly.” Per his death certificate, he was born 24 July 1912 in Wilson to James Whitfield of Wilson and Elizabeth McNeal of Fayetteville. He worked as a school teacher. Informant was James Whitfield.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1004 Washington Street, valued at $3500, house painter James Whitfield, 37; wife Elizabeth, 45; and daughters Lillian, 27, and Helen, 22.

James A. Whitfield, 61, of 1004 Washington Street, son of A.W. and Sallie Whitfield, married Elizabeth Jenkins, 44, of 612 East Green Street, daughter of Mary Sanders, on 13 February 1955 in Sims. Baptist minister George S. Stokes performed the ceremony in the presence of Howard M. Fitts Sr., Ruth J. Hines, Mrs. W.P. Brown and Mrs A.W. Stokes.

James Ashley Whitfield died 23 November 1960 at Duke Hospital, Durham, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born in 20 March 1892 in Wilson County to W.A. Whitfield and Sally (last name unknown); resided at 1004 Washington Street; was a self-employed contract painter; informant was Elizabeth S. Whitfield.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2017.

915 Atlantic Street.

The eighteenth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1930; 1 story; bungalow with traditional one-room, gable-roofed form; half-timber motif in porch gable; alum. sided.”

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 915 Atlantic, rented for $16/month, James Hawkins, 30, truck driver for a hardware company, and wife Sally, 27, a cook.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, Robert Ethridge is listed at 915 Atlantic Street.

Photograph taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2017.

901 Atlantic Street.

The eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “#901. Ca. 1930; 1 1/2 [stories]; Judge Hall house; bungalow with clipped-gable roof and dormer, engaged porch; aluminum sided; Hall was a carpenter.”

On 5 June 1917, Judge Hall of Vick Street, Wilson, registered for the World War I draft. Per his registration card, he was born 29 May 1888 in Wayne County; worked as a carpenter for Cleveland, Glover in Wilson; was single; and was thin and of medium height with brown eyes and black hair.

On 10 July 1917, Judge H. Hall, 30, of Wilson, son of Edwin and Avie Ann Hall, married Bettie B. Taylor, 34, of Wilson, daughter of Henry and Mary Battle of Nash County in Wilson. A.L.E. Weeks, a Missionary Baptist minister, performed the ceremony in the presence of C.L. Darden, W.H. Burton, and Lee A. Moore.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Atlantic Street, house carpenter Judge Hall, 34, wife Bettie, 37, and roomer Lossie Hooks, 22.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 901 Atlantic Street, carpenter Judge Hall, 42; wife Bettie, 42; son John W., 4; and a lodging family, cook Ellen Battle, 35, and her children Margrette, 15, Etta, 12, Minnie, 7, Julious, 10, and Norma, 3.

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Bettie Hall died 15 September 1939 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she resided at 901 Atlantic Street; was married to Judge Hall; was 50 years old; worked as a tobacco factory packer; and was born in Wilson County to Henry Battle and Margarett Lucas. Ellen Battle was the informant.

Judge Hall died 9 March 1954 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he resided at 901 Atlantic Street; was married; worked as a carpenter; was born 28 May 1886 in Wayne County to Edward and Arie Hall; and was buried at Turner Swamp cemetery, Wayne County. Bertha Hall was informant.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2017.