gambling

Desperate gambling gang.

In 1909, Wilson police raided Samuel H. Vick‘s Orange Hotel to bust up a “gambling joint” ensconced in its upper floor. Two gamblers escaped through windows, but the police managed to round up seven, plus the operator.

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News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.), 11 June 1909.

  • Charles Evans, alias Charles Stover, alias “Dog Head”
  • Banks Blow
  • Arthur D. Keiser
  • Wallace Dixon
  • Walter Scott
  • “Kid” McKoy
  • Henry Battle — perhaps, in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Wiggins Street, railroad laborer Harry Battle, 50; wife Ezabell, 45, hotel servant; and sons Henry, 24, and Frank, 21, railroad laborer. Henry Battle died 31 December 1910 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he lived on Nash Street; was born 6 January 1888 in Edgecombe County to Harry Battle and Isabella Bullock; and worked as a railroad hand. Informant was Harry Brant.
  • Jim Thompson

H.T. Bowers, known for his sinful life, gets saved.

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Wilson Daily Times, 3 February 1922.

Alfred L.E. Weeks was pastor of Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church, then located on Hadley Street.

Though he may have been “chief among the gamblers,” H.T. Bowers [not Bowser] did not leave much record in Wilson. He and Bertha Knight were married 30 January 1922 by Rev. Weeks. Per their marriage license, Bowers, 33, was the son of H.T. and Manda Bowers of Wilson County, and Knight, 31, was the daughter of Mahala Knight of Wilson County. The ceremony took place in the presence of F.F. Battle, Mack Bullock and David C. Weeks.

Bowers repented just in time, as he died of typhoid fever on 23 January 1923, a week shy of a year after his marriage. Per his death certificate, he was about 40 years old; was born in Texas; lived at 306 South Street; and was married to Bertha Bowers. Daisy McClain, 306 South, was the informant.