Month: November 2016

Burned a barn and stole a horse.

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Wilson Advance, 28 November 1884.

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Wilson Advance, 12 December 1884.

  • Joe Hinnant — in the 1870 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Emizel Hinnant, 30, with Harriet, 19, Tamer, 11, Henderson, 13, Mary, 7, Dennis, 8, and Joseph Hinnant, 1. In the 1880 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Tamer Hinnant, 20, and brothers James, 11, and Joseph Hinnant, 11.
  • Dave Powell
  • Lewis Freeman — in the 1880 census of Old Fields township, Lewis Freeman, about 55, wife (or daughter) Katy, 25, and Violet Eatman, 78.

I cannot get any information from the negroes.

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Ada Sauls – Mary Sauls my daughter. Died Sat. June 22; died in kitchen. I and grandchildren present. No one else present. Died about 1 o’clock; was in the kitchen when they – deceased – and Mary were there; Mary told one of the children to get her water; when I looked around she fell under the table; Sarah was in another room when Mary fell; they had no trouble during the day, had no trouble that could be seen from the road; After asking for water little girl began cry; ran to her and tried to get her up – hardly know what I did; say Gray Spell when he come; never told him that Mary and Sarah had been fighting; Mary and Sarah was continually scrapping about the children; Mary was continually complaining her heart; she was bloated ever since birth of her last child.

Gray Spell – I learned of this trouble June 22 12 o’clock; heard she was dead. I saw Mary laying on floor in dining room; Miss Farmer and the children was there; never saw Ada Sauls; Ada said they were eating, Mary and Sarah got to full, Ada wouldn’t let them fuss; Mary reached around to get something to hit Sarah with but she never arose; no licks passed; helped pick Mary up; put her on the bed; she was dead; never saw any blood or bruise.

Grace Farmer – I visited this house yesterday; heard her squalling; heard children say My poor mother is dead; when I got to the house she was on the floor dead; Estelle Sauls and her Mother was there; Sarah was on the outside; Evan Farmer Estelle & Ada Sauls helped to put her on the bed; heard Sarah say she didn’t believe Mary was dead; said God damn her she didn’t believe she was dead. She was obeying her mother by remaining on outside; I remained until late; assisted in shrouding; Sarah didn’t help; Never saw wounds except on her face; her hands were drawn.

Ada Sauls – 12 years old; was in room when mother died. She asked for water. I waited on her. Mother and Sarah was not mad; Aunt Sarah was not in room when Mother died; Mother fell backward; fell between bench & table; struck bench on one side. Sarah came in after death; no one told me what to say; I was looking at her when she fell; said nothing before falling.

Sarah Sauls – had no trouble with sister Saturday; Grace Farmer misunderstood me; I never cursed her; saw Grace when she got over fence; Never eat a mouthful for dinner; wasn’t in the room when she fell; wasn’t in room when mother was talking to Grace Spell; went in room after he fell; never saw any wounds on body; never held ill feeling against my sister. Only about children; Mary said Saturday morning, I feel like my heart will kill me.

Estell Sauls – Wasn’t in room when she died; Mary & Sarah to my knowing had not been fussing.

R.B. Etherid[g]e – Don’t know but little about affair; Gracie told me to send Dr. that Mary was foaming at mouth; didn’t know whether she was dead or not; asked her if there had been any trouble; nothing but few words fast. Went to depot and delivered message.

Jas. Bass – First I knew Spell came by me and said Mary Sauls was past speaking. Some one was fighting Mary & Jane.

John Hinnant – First heard of trouble between 12 & 1; heard she was dead; Spell told me she was dead; found Mary lying on the floor dead.

——

Black Creek NC, 6/23/07

Dear Doctor: —

Two negro women fighting yesterday at Jos. Horne’s place near the Branch farm blow struck one fell dead – sisters & I can’t get any information parties who saw body yesterday pm said blow on left eye little pierced hole above upper eyelid – Many People desire post mortem before burial at 4 pm I would suggest you come & bring such assistance as you deem sufficient.

Yours truly, H.M. Rowe

——

Black Creek NC, 6/23/07

D Sir:

I could not get any information from the negroes all of one family sisters at that I have written Coroner to come hold post mortem & that’s why I wired you.

Yours truly, H.M. Rowe

——

Sunday Afternoon, June 23, 1907,

We, the following jurors, summoned and duly sworn to enquire into the cause of death of Mary Sauls, find from the evidence adduced that the deceased came to her death from natural causes.  R.B. Evans, R.B. Ethridge, W.D. Ruffin, L.D. Tomlinson, Wiley Barnes, Jonathan Tomlinson, W.H. Anderson Coroner

——

  • Ada, Mary Ann, Sarah Jane, Estelle, and Ada Sauls — On 20 December 1869, Patrick Sauls married Ada Thompson in Wayne County, North Carolina. In the 1880 census of Saulston, Wayne County: Patrick Sauls, 28, wife Ada, 23, and children Walter, 9, Mary Ann, 7, Sarah J., 5, Hattie, 3, and Lee, 3 months. [Note: Lee Sauls swore, with an X, to an affidavit asserting his belief that his sister had died by criminal act. See above.] In the 1900 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Patric Saul, 57, wife Ada, 47, and children and grandchildren Mary A., 22, Susan, 5, Ester, 3, Sarrah, 28, Dewey, 3, Lee, 16, Clyde, 13, Enniss, 11, and Estelle, 9. Ada Sauls died 16 October 1925 in Black Creek township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was the widow of Parritt Sauls, born about 1853 in Green County, worked as a tenant farmer for Fred Carr. Dewey Sauls was informant. Sarah Sauls died 3 October 1961 in Wilson at her home at 102 N. East Street. Per her death certificate, she was born 12 May 1888 in Greene County to Patric Sauls and Ada Thomas and was buried in the femily cemetery in Black Creek. Bessie Sauls of 102 N. East Street was informant.
  • Gray Spell — in the 1900 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: widowed farmer Chaney Spells, 55, sons James S., 19, Gray, 17, Walter, 16, and Charley, 13, grandchildren Unity, 14, Fannie, 10, Irvin, 7, and Chaney Farmer, 2, and boarder Harriet Killibrew, 45.
  • Grace Farmer

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News & Observer (Raleigh), 25 June 1907.

Coroner’s Records, Miscellaneous Records, Wilson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

Real estate transfers.

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Wilson Daily Times, 10 October 1911.

  • Abram B. Simms — in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Abram Simms, 32, bricklayer, wife Mollie, 25, and children Annie, 7, and William, 4. On 31 December 1902, Abram B. Simms, 39, married Sue Wilkins, 37, in Wilson at Sue Wilkins’. Missionary Baptist minister W.M. Baker performed the ceremony.
  • Gilbert Stallings — in the 1908 Wilson city directory, Gilbert Stallings is listed as a farmer residing at 153 Suggs Street. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer Gilbert Stallings, 56, wife Annie, 50, and children Gilbert G., 19, Leonard, 16, and Georgia, 7. Gilbert Stallings died 13 August 1918 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 February 1854 in Franklin County to John Stallings and Hannah Ufferman; was married; and was a farmer. G.W. Stallings was informant.
  • S.H. Vick — Samuel H. Vick.
  • Nazareth Pierce — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 445 Goldsboro Street, Nazareth A. Pierce, 35, laborer, wife Ella, 34, laundress, and children Eugene, 9, Almada, 7, Leroy, 4, and Louis, 2. Nazareth Pierce died 16 February 1941 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born about 1877 in Franklin County, North Carolina, to Adam W. Pierce; lived at 415 East Green Street; was married to Ada A. Pierce; and worked as an insurance agent. He was buried in Rountree cemetery. Joseph L. Pierce was informant. An index of Social Security death claims lists his full name as Nazareth Andrew Pierce and his birth date as 15 June 1876.

Formerly principal of the Wilson graded school.

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REV. CHARLES H. SMITH, B.D.

Charles H. Smith was born in Jones County, near New Berne, N. C., in 1853, and is the son of Thomas and Harriet Smith. At an early age he entered the Northern school at New Berne, remaining there till he obtained a normal education, and then attended St. Augustine College, Raleigh, N. C., for three years. He occupied the position of principal of the Wilson graded school, giving entire satisfaction, until, becoming desirous of entering the ministry, he was ordained deacon by Bishop J. W. Hood at Salisbury in November, 1877, and given charge of Snow Hill Circuit. Here he so rapidly increased the membership that Bishop Hood divided the work, making two circuits. In 1880 he was ordained an elder at Tarboro, N. C. When he entered upon his duties as pastor of the Whiteville Circuit he found the Methodists and Baptists worshiping in the same church edifice, and at once set to work and built a beautiful church for Zion. A strong man was needed at Henderson, the Baptists being about to absorb the Methodists. Elder Smith entered his field, published a pamphlet on the proper mode of baptism, which obtained a general circulation, and soon became master of the situation. Henderson is now one of the strongholds of Zion in the North Carolina Conference.

In 1887 Rev. Smith was appointed pastor of St. Peter’s Church at New Berne and grandly entertained the General Conference at that church in 1888. A large debt on the church was canceled during his pastorate. While at New Berne he married the accomplished Miss Mamie Stanley, a teacher in the graded school of that city. Mrs. Smith makes a model minister’s wife. While a member of the North Carolina Conference Rev. Smith won the first prize in gold for the largest collection of General Fund. He was a member of the General Conferences of 1884, 1888, and 1892. He was transferred to the West Alabama Conference, where he erected a fine parsonage at Jefferson and relieved the church of debt. At Selma, Ala., he saved the church, which was about to be sold, and greatly reduced its debt. He is a strong temperance advocate, is generous and sympathetic, and an able scholar and theologian.

Nobody knows but you.

North Carolina, Wilson Co  }

The examination of the following witnesses, taken before the undersigned Coroner of said County, this 6th of July 1903 at the house of Turner Walston upon the body of the infant of Ollie Horne then and near there lying dead, to wit:

Delpha Bynum, being duly sworn, says:

I never saw anything but the after birth and I examined it. My question to her was where is the young one and Caline Barnes said there they are and I said Come & see what I am talking about, and I said to Ollie nobody knows but you where that baby is and then Caline Gracy Abram and Mollie Barnes commenced to hunt for it.

Mollie Barnes being duly sworn says:

I says, Ollie tell me where the baby is. She says Aint Duck I don’t know where it is. I haven’t seen anything but that in the night glass. She then told her sister Gracey to go & get her snuff box and then she would tell her where the child was and then I saw her when she pulled it out from under pillow and then I said to her, you laid on this baby and she said no I didn’t Aint Duck. The body looked like it was sort of mashed one side. I saw little blood running out of its nostrils.   Mollie (X) Barnes

Addie Artis being duly sworn says:

I was the first one got there and I went into the room where she was and she was down on the floor and asked her what was the matter with her and she told me she did not know and I said Ollie yes you do know what is the matter with you and I went into the other room and she told me to bring her some water to wash her hands and I went to get the water and there was some sitting on floor in a bucket and I carried her that and she told me to bring her some sweet soap and I asked her where it was and she told me it was over mantle piece & I carried it to her and by that time sister Caline Barnes come and I asked her what must we do and she said lets send after her sister Gracy and we sent after her and when she come we sent after Aunt Delpha Bynum. I was out doors when they found the baby. She pulled the baby out from under the pillow. I saw the baby and it looked like it was mashed. There was some blood rushing out of its nose.    /s/ Addie Arirs

Jim T. Burress being duly sworn says:

I saw the child. She was looking towards it, I asked her if that was her child & she told me yes. I asked her where she gave birth to it & she said there where she was. I asked her if it was dead when it was born & she said it was and I asked her if she tried to conceal it & she said she didn’t. She said she put it over her, behind her, in the bed.  /s/ Jno. T. Burress

Solomon Horn being duly sworn says:

I heard the child cry twice. I was sitting on door steps on outside. I heard one of the children cry twice. Don’t know which one.   Solomon (X) Horn

Gracy Pender being duly sworn says:

I was not there when the child was born. I saw the child when she pulled it out from under the pillow. I saw a little blood running out from its nose.  Gracy (X) Pender

Abram Pender being duly sworn says:

Solomon told you that when he come to the house he took a seat on door steps or bench one on side of house and heard something in there crying like a little baby. He did not tell me about another baby.  Abram (X) Pender

Caline Barnes being duly sworn says:

I went into the house and asked sister Addie what was the matter and she told me she did not know, but go into room & she – Ollie – was sitting there and everything all round her was terribly fixed. I says what is the matter with you and she says what did I reckon made all that cold blood come from her and I say Ollie you ought to know I don’t know whether it lived or not.   Caline (X) Barnes

Be it remembered that on this the 6th day of July 1903 I Albert Anderson, Coroner, of the County of Wilson attended by a Jury of good and lawful men: Chas. Walston, Frank Walston, Ben Walston, Turner Walston, Jos. Bynum (col) and Gaston Eason, by me summoned for that purpose, according to law, and after being by me duly sworn and empaneled at Turner Walston in the Co aforesaid, did hold an inquest over the dead body of the infant of Ollie Horn and after examination into the facts and circumstances of the deceased, from a view of the corps, and all the testimony to be procured the said Jury find as follows, that is to say that the children was born dead.  /s/ Gaston Eason, B.T. Walston, Chas. Walston, Frank (X) Walston, W.T. (X) Walston, Jos. (X) Bynum

Inquest had and signed and sealed in the presence of Albert Anderson, Coroner of Wilson Co.

——

  • Ollie Horne — in the 1900 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Luke Horn, 56, wife Mary, 23, and children Ollie, 23, Fannie, 17, Marcellus, 8, and William, 13.
  • Delphia Bynum Applewhite Bynum — on 23 October 1873, Warren Applewhite, 21, married Delsy Bynum, 20, at justice of the peace Elbert Felton’s in Saratoga township. In the 1880 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Warren Applewhite, 23, wife Delpha, 22, children Lillie, 3, and Marcellus, 2, and Sallie Ruffin, 6. On 1 May 1890, Delphia Applewhite, 35, daughter of Edna Best, married Henry Bynum, 45, son of Robert and Mary Bynum at Blount Knight’s. In the 1900 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: widow Delpy Bynum, 50, and children M., 21, Matthew, 18, Bessie, 16, and Aaron Applewhite, 14.
  • Mollie Barnes — in the 1900 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Jarmes Barnes, 44, wife Mollie, 41, and children Lilly, 11, Lula, 10, Aaron, 8, Arrena, 6, Calvin, 4, Harry, 3, and Geneva, 2.
  • Addie Barnes Artis — Addie Barnes, 20, married James Artis, 22, on 12 November 1900 at “parents’ house” in Saratoga township. Missionary Baptist minister E.P. Pearsall performed the ceremony in the presence of Dempsey Bullock, Andrew Sauls and J.H. Moore. Addie Artis died 30 June 1917 in Saratoga township. Per her death certificate, she was born 20 June 1879 in Wilson County to Isaac Barnes and Bettie Ellis. James A. Artis was informant.
  • Solomon Horne — in the 1910 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Solomon Horn 23, is listed as a hired man in the household of white farmer Joe J. Mattox. On 18 December 1913, Solomon Horn, 28, and Jane Eason, 32, both of Saratoga, were married at Jane Eason’s residence by Primitive Baptist minister B.J. Best. On 1 June 1919, Solomon Horn, 34, married Pearl Ward, 18, at J.B. Eason’s farm.
  • Grace Horne Pender — in the 1900 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Abraham Pender, 28, wife Gracey, 20, and newborn son Charley. In the 1910 census of Saratoga township: Abram Pender, 42, wife Grace, 30, and children Charlie, 10, Albert, 8, Floyd and Louis, 6, Willie, 4, Dallas J., 1, and Mary, 2 months.
  • Abram Pender — see Grace H. Pender, above.
  • Caroline Best Barnes — on 19 March 1885, Allen Barnes 22, married Caroline Best, 20, in Wilson. M.E. minister W.J. Gay performed the ceremony in the presence of Leamon Taborn, George Marshall and Alfred Robinson. In the 1900 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Allen Barnes, 37, wife Calliann, 34, and children John, 15, Mary L., 12, Della, 7, Corinna, 5, Willie, 3, and Bennie, 1, plus friend Fannie Mathe, 26.
  • Joseph Bynum — possibly, in the 1900 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Joe Bynum, 35, and wife Mary L., 35.

Coroner’s Records, Miscellaneous Records, Wilson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

Winstead, father and son.

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Ned Winstead, a Toisnot township farmer, was introduced here.

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Bryant Joseph Winstead was the youngest child of Ned and Annie Edwards Winstead.

In the 1910 census of Toisnot, Wilson County: on State Highway, farmer Ned Winstead, 52, wife Annie, 47, and children Maggie, 18, Lizzie, 14, Daniel, 12, John, 9, Lee, 6, and Bryant, 4.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot, Wilson County: on State Highway, farmer Ned Winstead, 58, wife Annie, 50, and children Maggie, 23, John, 18, and Bryant, 13, plus granddaughter Annie Bell, 9.

On 7 November 1931, in Smithfield, North Carolina, Bryant Winstead, 26, son of Ned and Annie Winstead, resident of Elm City, married Eva Green, 24, daughter of Neverson and Isabella Green, resident of Wilson.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 200 North Pender Street (a large rooming house), tobacco factory worker Bryant Winstead, 35, wife Eva, 32, and daughter Delores, 12.

In 1940, Bryant Joseph Winstead registered in Wilson County for the World War II draft. Per his registration card, he was born 14 January 1905 in Elm City; resided at 305 North Carroll Street; worked for Export Tobacco Company in Wilson; and had a wife named Mrs. Addie Winstead.

Bryant J. Winstead died 31 January 1971 in Portsmouth, Virginia. Per his death certificate, he was born in Elm City, North Carolina, to Ned and Ann Edwards Winstead on 14 January 1905; resided in Portsmouth; was an auto operator at a naval hospital;and was married to Addie Lucas Winstead. He was buried at Lincoln Memorial Cemetery, Portsmouth.

Photographs courtesy of Lisa R.W. Sloan. Many thanks.

Men ordered to report, no. 4.

On 30 March 1918, the Wilson County Draft Board inducted these 24 African-American men into military service and ordered them sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, for basic training.

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  • Will McNeill registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 near Denver, Colorado; resided on Sugg Street, Wilson; was a laborer for R.G. Lassiter & Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Zion Powell registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 4 April 1889 in Newport News, Virginia; resided in Wilson; was a laborer for Jake Matthews, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Alexander B. Joyner registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896, Wilson; resided at 616 Viola Street, Wilson; was a chair pusher (?) for Shill Company, Atlantic City; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘A.B. Joyner.’
  • Willis Hackaday
  • Samies Simpson registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 11 May 1896 in Rocky Point, North Carolina; resided at 525 Bank Street, Wilson; was a laborer for W.T. Russel Box Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Samie Simpson.’
  • Abert Robert Lee Bullock registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 19 February 1895 in Wilson; resided at 410 North Pine Street, Wilson; was a cook at the New Briggs Hotel in Wilson; and was single. He was short and medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Abert Robert Lee Bullock.’
  • Columbus Stewart registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 25 December 1895 in Feuquay Springs, North Carolina; resided in Wilson; was a convict in Wilson County; and was married. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Columbus Stewart.’
  • Waverly Murfey registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Mount Olive, North Carolina; resided in Wilson; was a prisoner on Wayne County Public Roads; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Solister Coleman registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 30 April 1894 in Nichols, South Carolina; resided at 517 East Nash Street, Wilson; worked as an express laborer for Saw[?] Express, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Solister Coleman.’
  • Two African-American men named Will Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per their registration cards, the first was born 6 January 1890 in Wilson County; resided on East Street, Wilson; was a cook for C.E. Artis in Wilson; and was single. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Will Barnes.’ The second was born 13 August 1892 in Wilson; resided at 310 Kenan Street, Wilson; was a laborer for John Dew, Wilson; was married with a child. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Raston Williams
  • George Hawkins registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born on an unspecified date in Wilson County; resided in Wilson, care of Wiley Corbett; was a stable boy for Ed Dillard, Wilson; and was single. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Ernest Hines registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born on 24 December 1895 in Elm City; resided in Elm City; was a farm laborer for Geo. Gaston in Elm City; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X. The card carried this notation: “Registered by order of U.S. Marshal.”
  • Five African-American men named Henry Williams registered for the draft in Wilson County. This is most likely the Henry Williams born 1 January 1895 in Lynchburg, Virginia. Per his registration card, he resided in Wilson; worked on the roads of Wilson County; and was single. He was short and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Floyd Pender registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 14 March 1896 in Wilson County; resided in Wilson; was a bootblack for Tate & Hines in Wilson; and was single. He was short and medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Floyd Pender.’
  • Stacey Edwards
  • Three African-American men named John Artis registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. This was most likely either John Ed Artis born 31 March 1889 in Stantonsburg or John Artis born 16 March 1894 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, the elder John Artis worked as a farmer for E.B. Graves of Wilson; was married with four children; medium height and weight, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card with the X. The younger John Artis resided on East Green Street, Wilson; was a porter at Hotel Briggs, Wilson; and was single. He was short and of medium weight, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Lonnie Jackson registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 12 September 1895 in Beaufort County, North Carolina; resided at 217 Railroad Street, Wilson; was a laborer for Wilson Cotton Mill; and was single. He was short and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. Notation: “Hand has been injured.” He signed his card with an X.
  • Burley Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 7 April 1896 in Greene County, North Carolina; resided at 615 Robinson Street, Wilson; worked repairing machinery for C.H. Darden in Wilson; and was single. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Burly Brooks.’
  • Earnest Chester Byrd registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 17 March 1896 in Harnett County, Nirth Carolina; resided at 404 Goldsboro Street, Wilson; was a butler for Mrs. Ed. Woodard, Wilson; and was single. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Earnest C. Byrd.’
  • Strat Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 in resided in Wilson; was a laborer for R.G. Lassiter & Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Amos Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Black Creek; resided in Wilson; was a farm laborer for P.S. Horne, Black Creek township; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Plummer Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Pitt County, North Carolina; resided on R.F.D. 6, Wilson; was a farming hand for W.F. Woodard, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.

U.S. Lists of Men Ordered to Report to Local Board for Military Duty, 1917-1918, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Rev. J.T. Deans and the Kenansville Association.

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Though Rev. J.T. Deans lived in Wilson (A), the four Missionary Baptist churches he pastored — Mount Gilead, Willard, Shoulder’s Branch, Union Chapel — were in Mount Olive (B), Willard (C), Castle Hayne (D), and Currie (E), North Carolina, respectively. Wilson to Mount Olive is 40 miles. Wilson to Castle Hayne is 108 miles.

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——

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 514 Lodge Street, school principal James T. Deans, 53, wife Mary, 34, and children Rosevelt, 16, James Jr., 9, Walter, 5, Therodore, 3, and Dixie, 2 months, and boarder Daniel Gunn, 57, a tobacco factory worker.

James Thomas Deans died 20 December 1939 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 74 years old, born in Nash County to Sarah Deans of Nash County, resided at 514 South Lodge Street, was a preacher, was married to Ada Drewcilla Deans, and was buried in Warsaw [Duplin County], North Carolina. Ada D. Deans was informant.

Minutes of the Forty-Ninth Annual Session of the Kenansville Missionary Baptist Association (1919).