Woodard

The Stantonsburg Hawks.

Wilson was not the only county town to field an African-American semi-pro baseball team. From 1945 into the late 1970s, the Stantonsburg Hawks traveled neighboring counties

John Lee Woodard (1917-1995) was the team founder, and players throughout its history included his son Willie Woodard, Ernest D. Hall, Frederick Brown, Johnnie Streeter, Roy Lee Pender, Marvin R. Artis, George Artis, Tommy Rogers, Nathaniel Green Jr., William Sutton, Henry Revelle, Carter Knight, Raymond Mackey, Marvin Sessoms, Levy Daniel Jr., Melvin Hodges, Cleveland Leach, Joseph Green, Julius Green, Theodore Ward, Douglas Artis, Melvin Artis Jr., George Atkinson, and Ronnie Diggs.

I am trying to identify the Hawks’ earliest players, teammates of John L. Woodard. Do you know of anyone who played baseball with them in the 1940s?

I recognize three men in this photo — Ernest D. Hall seated at front left; Willie Lee Woodard (son of John L. Woodard, front row with glove on ground; and George Artis, second in second row. Who do you see?

Thanks to Tiyatti Speight for bringing this team to my attention and for the copy of this wonderful photo.

929 Carolina Street.

The one hundred eighty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1940; 1 story; shotgun with bungalow type porch posts.”

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In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bullock Joseph (c; Sadie) lab h 929 Carolina

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, the house was vacant.

Wilson Daily Times, 29 October 1940.

This issue of the Wilson Daily Times reported that the draft numbers of James Woodard of 929 Carolina Street and Lewis Townsend of 506 Banks Street.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Woodard James (c; Annie; 1) delmn h 929 Carolina

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Handley [Handy] Jessie (c; Levan) brklyr h 929 Carolina

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, September 2022.

Virginia Woodard’s death ruled an accident.

The Wilson County sheriff initially believed that Virginia Woodard‘s death was suspicious and held Roland May, Jonah May, Willard Woodard, and Gertie Hilliard while it was investigated.

Wilson Daily Times, 29 September 1941.

However, after an inquest that drew a hundred nosy onlookers to the courthouse, a jury returned a verdict of “death by fall from car” and released all.

Wilson Daily Times, 1 October 1941.

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In the 1940 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: widower Ausbin Horne, 67; children Ausbin Jr., 18, Jessie L., 15, Anna L., 13, Wright, 12, and Virginia, 23; grandchildren J.C., 9, and George, 3;  step-daughter Zet, 24, and step-grandchildren Earnest Lee, 5, Jason, 1, and Albert, 4.  

On 13 July 1940, in Emporia, Virginia, William Woodard, 29, born in Greene County, N.C., to Charlie Woodard and Appie Speight, married Virginia Horne, 22, born in Wilson County to Osborne Horne and Virginia Applewhite.

Virginia Woodard died 28 September 1941 on Highway 222, Saratoga township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 24 years old; was married to William Woodard; was born in Wilson County to Alsland Horn and Virginia Applewhite; and was buried in Ellis Cemetery. 

He heard a bump and stopped; second highway death in three days.

Wilson Daily Times, 31 August 1942.

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  • Fred Woodard — in the 1940 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Fred Woodard, 36; wife Maggie, 36; and children Roy, 15, John D., 13, Doris N., 11, Fred Jr., 9, and Rosie Lee, 7. Fred Woodard died 30 August 1942 in Cross Roads township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 1904 in Wilson County to William Woodard and Cora [maiden name unknown]; was engaged in farming; and was buried in Newsome cemetery.
  • George Allen — in the 1940 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer George Allen, 45; his children George Love, 18, Clinton, 16, Ula Pearl, 14, Petronia, 13, and Josephine, 10; niece Jessie, 18; sister Rosa Creech, 35, and niece R. Virginia Creech, 14.
  • Mamie Daniel — in the 1940 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Louis Daniel, 56; wife Mamie, 42; and farm hand Willie R. Bynum, 18. Mamie Daniel died 27 August 1942 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 1902 in Johnston County, N.C., to Willie Wilson and Phillis Smith; was married to Louis Daniel; and was buried in Beckie Pate cemetery.

The death of Junius Woodard, another victim of the Contentnea Guano collapse.

We’ve read of the death of Rev. Basil B. Tyler, crushed under a cascade of fallen timber. Two other men, Junius Woodard and Tobe Bellamy, were seriously injured.  Bellamy recovered and lived to see 104 years. Junius Woodard, on the other hand, was dead within weeks from septicemia arising from a compound fracture of his lower leg.

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In the 1880 census of Speights Bridge township, Greene County: laborer Jesse Woodard, 36; wife Pennie, 28; and children Caroline, 14, Junius, 6, Margarett, 4, Mary, 3, Willie, 2, and Minnie, 11 months.

On 24 April 1901, Junius Woodard, 26, married Ella Barnes, 20, in Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony in the presence of G.H. Holden, W.M. Foster, and J.S. Jackson.

This version of the accident offers slightly different details, but is not entirely accurate. Woodard, not “Woodward,” was not white. The Times-Mercury (Hickory, N.C.), 24 November 1909.

The obituary of Roscoe Woodard, nonagenarian.

Wilson Daily Times, 18 March 2022.

In the 1930 census of Eureka township, Wayne County, North Carolina:  farm laborer Marcelius Woodard, 36; wife Adlonia, 26; children Adrew, 6, Roscoe, 5, Dover L., 3, and Kelvin, 1; Leslie Malone, 30, farm laborer; and Nannie Hastings, 48, widow, farm laborer.

In the 1940 census of Faison township, Duplin County, North Carolina: farmer Marcellus Woodard, 46; wife Adlonia, 35; and children Andrew, 17, Rosker, 15, Donie, 13, Calvin, 11, Roosevelt, 9, Mary, 7, Margree, 4, and Jessie James, 5 months.

Roscoe Woodard registered for the World War II draft in 1943 in Wilson County. 

On 26 January 1948, Roscoe Woodard, 22, of Route 1, Walstonburg, son of Marcellus Woodard and Adalone Fields Woodard, married Flora Bell Evans, 18, of Route 1, Wilson, daughter of Robert Evans and Ruby Edwards Evans, in Wilson County. 

In the 1950 census of 

 

929 Carolina Street.

The one hundred seventieth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1940; 1 story; shotgun with bungalow type porch posts.”

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In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bullock Joseph (c; Sadie) lab h 929 Carolina

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, the house was vacant.

In 1940, James Woodard registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 1 July 1913 in Wilson; lived at 929 Carolina Street; his contact was wife Annie Reid Woodard; and he worked for Russel Herman McLawhorn, 105 Bragg Street, Wilson. 

“Draft Numbers of Wilson Men Drawn Today,” Wilson Daily Times, 29 October 1940.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Woodard Jas (c; Annie; 1) delmn h 929 Carolina

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Handley Jesse (c; Levan) brklyr h929 Carolina

Photo By Lisa Y. Henderson, April 2022.

The obituary of Zillie Woodard Howard.

Wilson Daily Times, 7 June 1943.

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In the 1880 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Alfred Woodard, 50; wife Sarah, 45; children Florence, 28, Mary, 22, Howell, 18, Sarah E., 16, Zilly A., 17, Lundon, 13, Minnie, 12, Willie, 10, Josephine, 7, and Evvy, 4; and grandchildren Elizabeth, 7, Robt. B., 5, and John H. Bynum, 4.

On 5 June 1901, Jesse Howard, 33, of Black Creek, son of Delius [Zealous] and Rhoda Howard, married Zillah Woodard, 32, of Taylor township, daughter of Alfred and Sarah Woodard, at Sarah Woodard’s in Wilson County. Willie Rountree registered for the license, and Missionary Baptist minister E.P. Pearsall performed the ceremony in the presence of Rountree, Phyllis Hagans, and Sarah Woodard.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farm laborer Jessee Howard, 45; wife Zilla, 40; and children Henry, 25, florist, Marenda, 19, public school teacher, Lena, 17, Kensey, 15, farm laborer, Leaola, 13, and Jessie Jr., 1.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: laborer Jesse Howard, 54; wife Zillia, 54; and children (or grandchildren) Cleo, 21, Ella M., 14, William, 7, and Samuel, 4.

In the 1925, 1928, and 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, Zillie Howard is listed at 934 Carolina Street.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 934 Carolina, owned and valued at $2000, Zellia Howard, 40, widow, maid, and grandsons William, 17, shoe shop cobbler, Oliver, 15, and Samuel Howard, 12, and Howard Artist, 4.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 934 Carolina, valued at $800, widow Zilla Howard, 75; her sister Nora Hinton, 64, divorced; also, paying $4/month, Helen Ford, 22, and Lydia, 5; grandson Sammie Howard, 22; and, paying $2/month, Annie Jenkins, 69.

In 1940, Oliver Lee Howard registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 12 August 1914 in Wilson; he lived at 934 Carolina Street; his contact was his grandmother Zillie Woodard Howard; and he worked for Imperial Tobacco Company, Barnes Street, Wilson.

In 1940, Buster Howard registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 1 September 1924 in Wilson; he lived at 934 Carolina Street; his contact was his grandmother Zillie Howard; and he worked for R.P. Watson & Company, Lodge Street, Wilson.

Zillie Woodard Howard died 6 June 1943 at her home at 934 Carolina Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 29 April 1865 in Wilson to Alfred Woodard and Harriett [last name unknown] and was the widow of Jessie Howard. Oliver Howard of the home was informant.

On 30 October 1944, . Howard had left all her property to her sister, Nora Hinton, and named John M. Barnes as executor. Almus A. Lovett and Letitia H. Lovett witnessed.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

608 Viola Street.

The one hundred sixty-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1913; 1-story; L-plan cottage.” The original address was 619 Viola.

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In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Harrison Reginald (c; Bessie) driver Hackney Oil Co h 608 Viola

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Reddit Jos (c; Mary) lab h 608 Viola

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 608 Viola, rented for $14/month, Joseph Redditt, 34, oil mill laborer; wife Mary, 26; niece Eva Branch, 16; and roomer Lucy Barnes, 29, cook.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 608 Viola, paying $11/month, Josh White, 48, factory deliveryman, born in Georgia, and wife Pecorria, 41, chambermaid at girls college; paying $4/month, Florine Jones, 24, servant, born in Georgia; husband Preston, 29, service station attendant, born in South Carolina; and daughters Hattie Pearl, 7, and Doris E., 4. [By October 1940, the Joneses had relocated to Richmond, Virginia, where Preston Jones registered for the World War II draft.]

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Woodard Flossie (c) cook h 608 Viola

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, April 2022.

Chester Woodard participates in corn variety test.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 May 1940.

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In the 1920 census of Speights Bridge township, Greene County, N.C.: farmer Johnie Woodard, 28; wife Emma Line, 29; and children Marvin, 6, Chester, 4, and Mary Adell, 21 months.

In the 1930 census of Gardners, Wilson County: farmer Johnie Woodard, 47; wife Emma L., 45; children Marvin, 18, Chester, 16, Adell, 14, Vernell[Vernon] L., 12, Jounes [Junius], 10, and Sherman W., 6; and lodger John McCory, 28.

In the 1940 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: widow Emiline Woodard, 48, farmer, and children Marvin, 26, farmer, Chester, 24, farmer, Mary, 21, beautician, Vornal, 19, Junious, 15, Helen G., 9, Bennie J., 6, and Thurman, 12.

In 1940, Chester B. Woodard registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his draft registration, he was born 5 August 1915 in Greene County, N.C.; lived at R.F.D. #4, Wilson; his contact was Emiline Woodard, mother; and was employed by Emiline Woodard.