Woodard

Snaps, no. 74: Fred Woodard.

Fred Woodard (1861-1935).

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In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farm laborer Benj’n Woodard, 32, wife Harriet, 31, and children Edna, 13, Frederick, 9, and Venah, 6.

In the 1880 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Benjamin Woodard, 42, wife Harriet, 39, children Frederick, 18, Maggie, 15, and Ruth, 10, plus a servant with neuralgia named Merrit Joyner, 23.

On 4 January 1888, Fred Woodard, 25, son of Benj’n and Mary Woodard, married Mary Oneal, 20, daughter of Scott Oneal, in Black Creek township, Wilson County.

In the 1900 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Fred Woodard, 40; wife Mary L., 32, school teacher; and son Linwood, 2.

In the 1910 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Fred Woodard, 43; wife Mary L., 36; and children Linwood, 12, Nathanael, 10, Sylvester, 7, Stephen, 5, and Nebraska, 3.

Linwood Woodard registered for the World War I draft in 1918. Per his registration card, he was born 9 September 1898; lived at Route 5, Wilson; farmed for Walter Woodard; and his nearest relative was Fred Woodard.

Fred Woodard died 12 October 1935 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 73 years old; was born in Wilson County to Ben Woodard and Harriet Dawson; was the widower of Mary L. Woodard; was a farmer; and lived at 406 Banks Street, Wilson. Linwood Woodard, Greenville, N.C., was informant.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user kelliwoodard21.

Rev. Woodard’s brother.

The Bystander (Des Moines, Iowa), 5 December 1913.

We have met Rev. Franklin Brown Woodard, a native of Wilson County. Who was “his brother of Omaha”? Romulus L. Woodard, who migrated first to Omaha, Nebraska, and then to Saint Louis, Missouri.

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In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Frank Woodard, 37; wife Appie, 32; and children Frank, 11, and Romulus, 9.

Per city directories, Romulus Woodard was in Omaha as early as 1904.

Omaha, Nebraska, City Directory (1910).

In the 1910 census of South Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska: barber Romulus L. Woodard, 43, and roomers James Johnson, 55, packing company laborer; John Boyston, 58, hod carrier; and Cap Harris, 58, janitor.

In the 1920 census of Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska: barber in own shop Romulus Woodard, 48, and roomers Milage Lambert, 50, and Fred Ilworth, 35, both packhouse laborers.

In December 1921, Romulus L. Woodard applied for a license to marry Mrs. Sarah F. Mitchell in Saint Louis, Missouri.

Saint Louis Dispatch, 15 December 1921.

In the 1930 census of Saint Louis, Saint Louis County, Missouri: at 4353 Cozens Avenue or Alley, dry goods store porter Romulus Woodard, 51, and wife Frankie, 45, hairdresser.

Per Findagrave.com, Romulus Woodard died 2 April 1938. He was buried in Washington Park Cemetery, Berkeley, Missouri, and his headstone noted his birthdate as 21 March 1887. [In fact, he was born about 1870.]

Rev. Franklin Brown Woodard.

Portraits of Rev. Franklin B. Woodard are posted on the blog of Legacy Museum of African-American History in Lynchburg, Virginia. The text of the post: “Rev. Frank B. Woodard was born and raised in Wilson County, North Carolina. He studied at Virginia Seminary and graduated in 1904. Woodard led churches in Michigan and Iowa and served as the President of the Iowa–Nebraska Convention. He died in 1919.”

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In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farm laborer Frank Woodard, 25; wife Appie, 23; son Frank Jr., 1; and Samuel, 20, farm laborer.

In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Frank Woodard, 37; wife Appie, 32; and children Frank, 11, and Romulus, 9.

On 29 August 1906, in Lynchburg, Virginia, Franklin Brown Woodard, 38, born in Wilson County, North Carolina, to Frank and Apsilla Woodard, married Margaret C. Minnis, 27, born in Bedford County, Virginia, to Henry L. and Mamie Minnis.

In the 1910 census of Bluff Creek township, Monroe County, Iowa: Frank B. Woodard, 41, born N.C.; wife Margurite C., 31, born Virginia; and children Thelma K., 2, born Michigan, and Virginia L., 1, born Iowa. 

On 2 June 1915, Franklin Brown Woodard, 46, widowed, born in Wilson County, N.C., to Frank and A. Woodard, married Rosa Mildred Jones, 36, born in Buxton, Iowa, to Lewis and M. Jones, in Lynchburg, Virginia. 

The Bystander (Des Moines, Iowa), 7 June 1918.

Rev. Frank B. Woodard died 5 September 1919 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

The Bystander (Des Moines, Iowa), 12 September 1919.

Rev. Woodard’s body was returned to Lynchburg for burial.

Woodard’s wife Rosa was appointed guardian to her step-daughters Thelma and Virginia. Though certified to teach, Rosa Woodard was in poor health, and year after year applied to the Linn County, Iowa, District Court to draw money from Frank Woodard’s estate to provide for the girls.

Petition for letters of guardianship.

Rosa Woodard’s first application for funds. She stated that it was too late in the year to get a teaching job.

Another petition for funds, in which Rosa Woodard revealed that she had been ill for months and had spent several weeks at Freedmen’s Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Virginia Lavurn Woodard, born in Buxton, Iowa, to Frank Brown Woodard and Margaret Celeste Minnis, married John Henry Hughes Jr., born in Bedford County, Virginia, to John Henry Hughes and Lucretia Ann Griffin, on 1 March 1931 in Lynchburg, Virginia. 

Rosa Jones Woodard

Rosa Jones Woodard died 1 August 1957 at her home at 904 Eighth Street, Lynchburg, Virginia. Per her death certificate, she was born 27 February 1885 in Lynchburg to Louis Jones and Margaret Taylor; was a widow of Frank B. Woodard; and had worked as a teacher and school matron. Informant was Virginia Hughes, Lynchburg.

Photos of Frank and Rosa Woodard courtesy of Legacy Museum; photo of Woodard headstone courtesy of findagrave.com; Iowa Wills and Probate Records, 1758-1997, http://www.ancestry.com.

The obituary of Moses Woodard.

Wilson Daily Times, 24 August 1928.

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In 1918, Moses Woodard registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 6 November 1873; lived at 615 Darden, Wilson; worked as a laborer for Imperial Tobacco Company, Ltd.; and his nearest relative was wife Mary Woodard.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 615 Darden, carpenter Moses Woodard, 47, and wife Mary, 32.

“Septicemia due to a burn on finger. Arm had to be opened in two places”

Hat tip to J. Robert Boykin III for sharing this clipping.

O.N. Freeman’s handiwork.

O. Nestus Freeman‘s stonework was not limited to houses. Below, a mailbox stand he created for his good friend John W. Woodard, who lived west of Wilson on Tartts Mill Road.


The handcarved inscription reads
: J.W. Woodard, R.F.D. No 4, Box 33, Wilson N.C. Nov. 12, 1935

Photo courtesy of J.W. Woodard’s grandson Daryl M. Woodard. Thank you!

Pop-bottle blow.

N&O 08 28 1944.png

News and Observer (Raleigh, N.C.), 28 August 1944.

Robert Evans was arrested and charged with murder after flipping a glass bottle back at Walter T. Woodard.

Two weeks later, Evans was free. Judge J.J. Burney had directed a verdict of acquittal — meaning the prosecution has not proved its case under any reasonable interpretation of the facts.

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Wilson Daily Times, 12 September 1944.

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“Blow on head with Bottle Instant death”

In memory of Mary Susan Hall Woodard.

Mary Susan “Sue” Hall Woodard passed away on 5 May 2020, her 97th birthday. She was born near Stantonsburg to Robert and Katie Farmer Hall. In her honor, I offer this brief look at her deep-rooted Wilson County family lines.

  • Robert Hall was born about 1886 and died 19 January 1957 in Stantonsburg township. Per his death certificate, he was born in Wilson County to William Hall and Lucy [Barnes] Hall; was a farmer; and was buried in Bethel cemetery.

Hall

William Henry Hall‘s family is discussed in detail here and here.

In the 1900 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farm laborer William H. Hall, 49; son James, 18; daughter Mary S., 16; and son Robert, 13.

In the 1910 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on Main Street, Robert Hall, 24, railroad section hand; wife Katy, 20; son Earnest, 1; sister-in-law Leona Farmer, 7; and father William Hall, 60, widower.

In 1917, Robert Hall registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 18 July 1886 in Stantonsburg; was a farmer for J.C. Stanton in Stantonsburg; and was married with three children.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: tenant farmer Robert Hall, 33; wife Katie, 29; and children Earnest, 11, William H., 5, Lorenzie, 3, and Robert, 2.

William Henry Hall died 23 June 1925 in Saratoga township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 August 1846 in Wayne County to Exaline Hunt; was married to Lucy Hall; and was buried in Bethel cemetery.

In the 1930 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Robert Hall, 43; wife Katie, 40; and children Ernest, 21, William, 15, Rennie, 13, Robert Jr., 11, Louis, 10, Mary S., 6, John L., 4, and Curtis, 1 month; and daughter-in-law Arneta [Ometa], 20.

In the 1940 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Robert Hall, 50; wife Katie, 50; and children Sue, 16, John Lee, 14, Curtis, 10, James, 6, and grandchildren Ruth, 8, and Edgar C., 5.

Barnes

On 30 March 1871, William Hall, son of James Woodard and Elizar Woodard [actually, Hall], married Lucey Barnes, daughter of Levey Barnes and A. Barnes, in Wilson County.

  • Katie Farmer Hall was born about 1896 to Robert Farmer and Marenda Bynum Farmer. She died 8 September 1947 in Stantonsburg township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 27 March 1896 in Wilson County to Robert Farmer and Fannie [sic] Bynum; was married to Robert Hall; and worked in farming. She was buried Bethel cemetery.

Farmer

Ned Farmer and Jane Bynum registered their seven-year cohabitation with a Wilson County justice of the peace in 1866.

Ned Farmer apparently died between 1866 and 1870.

In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Isaac Winstead, 52; wife Jane, 35; and children Edith, 10, Robert, 7, Amanda, 3, and Aneliza, 1. [Edith and Robert’s last name was, in fact, Farmer; they were Jane’s children from a previous marriage.]

In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Isaac Winstead, 60; wife Jane; children Manda, 14, Ann, 12, Charlie, 10, Major, 7, Lucy, 4, and Levi, 1; stepchildren Ada [Edith] Best, 20, and Rob Farmer, 17; and grandchildren Sam, 3, and Mary Best, 1.

On 9 March 1882, Robert Farmer, 19, married Marinda Bynum, 18, in the Town of Stantonsburg. Scott Bynum, Ben Thompson, and George Culis were witnesses to the ceremony.

Marenda Bynum Farmer died before 1908.

On 8 January 1908, Robert Hall, 21, of Stantonsburg, son of Bill Hall and Lucy Hall, married Katie Farmer, 20, of Stantonsburg, daughter of Robert Farmer and Renie Farmer, at the home of Nealy Barnes in Stantonsburg, Wilson County. Witnesses were George Farmer, Nealy Barnes, and Susan Farmer.

Bynum

Lewis Bynum and Delia Bynum registered their cohabitation with a Wilson County justice of the peace on 31 August 1866.

In the 1870 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farm laborer Lewis Bynum, 30; wife Adelia, 29; and children George, 10, Ada, 9, Scott, 7, Penny, 6, Pet, 4, Isabella, 2, and Charles, 8 months; also, Obedience Applewhite, 63.

Adelia Bynum died before 1877.

On 9 August 1877, Lewis Bynum, 40, married Jane Bynum, 40, in Saratoga township, Wilson County.

In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: carpenter Lewis Bynum, 50; wife Jane, 47; children Renny, 15, Scott, 17, Pet, 14, Belle, 12, Charley, 10, and Tedy, 8; and granddaughter Nella, 2 months.

Lewis Bynum died between 1880 and 1900.

Rest in peace, Sue Hall Woodard.

Many thanks to the Hall family for sharing photographs.

The last will and testament of James B. Woodard.

I James B. Woodard of the County of Wilson, State of North Carolina, being of sound mind but advanced in years, & aware of the uncertainty of life, do make, constitute & declare this to be my last will & testament in manner & form as follows.

Second. I give & devise to my Eldest daughter Elizabeth Ann Stancil wife of Thomas Stancil the land on which she now lives, known as the Atkinson land containing about two hundred & twenty acres …, the following Slaves, negro man Elvin, woman Feriba & girl Dellah and their increase ….

I also give & bequeath to my son John B. Woodard negro man London to have & to hold ….

Fifth. I give & devise to my son George W. Woodard the balance of my home tract of land on which my dwelling and improvements are bounded …. I also give & bequeath … the following slaves Howell & Jesse ….

Sixth. I give & bequeath to my daughter Margaret P. Batts wife of W.W. Batts the following slaves Sarah, Florence, Phebe, Mary & young Sarah and their increase ….

Seventh. I give & bequeath to my daughter Mary J. Edwards wife of W.H. Edwards the following slaves Harriett, Debba, Ben, Ned, Rose & Fanny and their increase ….

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this the 22 day of June A.D. 1863.       /s/ Jas. B. Woodard

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James B. Woodard’s will — drafted six months after the Emancipation Proclamation — included bequests of 17 enslaved people. Most were descendants of London Woodard (whom he had sold to Penny Lassiter in 1856) and his first wife Venus, including their children Elvin, Feriba, London Jr., Howell, Sarah, Harriet, and Rose, and daughter Feriba’s children Ben, Debba, young Sarah, and, possibly, Mary.