Sports

Seven fights on tonight’s card.

Open just months, the Reid Street Community Center hosted bouts between Wilson County boxers eighty years ago today.

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Wilson Daily Times, 30 March 1939.

  • Charlie Farris — Charles Patrick Farris (1907-1958), son of Joseph and Rosa Selim Farris.
  • Walter Parker
  • Baby Ray
  • Jimmy Knight
  • Henry Mills
  • Emanuel Hill — in the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Henry Hill, 54, farm laborer; wife Rosa, tobacco factory laborer; daughter Mamie Autry, 28, tobacco factory laborer; sons William, 22, oil mill laborer, Jessie, tobacco factory laborer, Emanuel, 17, “new worker, and Benjamin Hill, 14; daughter Mertina Hill, 12; and grandchildren Deloris, 6, Dorthy, 4, and Timothy Autry, 2. Emanuel Hill registered for the World War II draft in 1942 in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 15 July 1922 in Wilson; lived at 104 Carroll Street, Wilson; his contact was Mrs. Evelina Carr, 1308 East Nash; and he worked at Norfolk Naval Base, Norfolk, Virginia. (He was described as 5’10”, 166 pounds.)
  • James Hardy
  • David Cox — possibly: in the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 208 Pender Street, Leslie H. Cox, 58; wife Mary J., 53; children Nancy, 26, servant, Flossie, 20, servant, Leslie Jr., 18, hotel bellhop, David, 16, “new worker,” and Ardelia, 13; and grandson June Lee Cox, 9. David Cox registered for the World War I draft in Richmond, Virginia. Per his registration card, he was born 17 September 1923 in Wilson; he resided at 1216 West Moore Street, Richmond (later, 269 West 153rd Street #5, New York, New York); his contact was Flossie K. Cox; and he worked for Nagoo Sanyons, 904 North Boulevard. (This David was 5’2″, 202 pounds — could it really be the same man?)
  • Belton McGirt
  • Harvey Ford — in the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 409 Carroll Street, carpenter Curtis Ford, 52; sons Quincey, 20, and Harvey G., 19, tobacco factory laborers; wife Mayme, 48, teacher; son-in-law Liston Sellers, 22, tobacco factory laborer; daughter Leah, 22, and granddaughter Yvette, 2. Harvey Gray Ford registered for the World War II draft in Wilson in February 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 8 January 1921 in Wilson; lived at 910 East Green Street; was unemployed; and his contact was mother Mamie Ford. (He was listed at 5’9″, 150 pounds.) Harvey Gray Ford died in a drowning accident on 4 June 1942 in Falling Creek, Lenoir County, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 January 1921 in Wilson to Curtis Ford of Dillon, S.C., and Mamie Battle of Wayne County, N.C.; was a single student; and resided at 910 East Green, Wilson.
  • Bruce Bynum — in the 1920 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farmer Josh Bynum, 43; wife Mamie, 28; and children Robert, 16, Bertie, 6, Belva, 4, Bruce, 2, and Beulah, 5 months. In the 1940 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Belvar Bynum, 23, farm laborer; brother Bruce, 22, WPA hospital laborer; sister Beulah, 21; and nephew George, 7. Bruce Bynum registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1918; resided at Route 2, Walstonburg, Wilson County; his contact was friend Willie Robert Owens; and he worked for Edd Gay. (Bynum was still at fighting weight. His card shows he was 5’8″, 165 pounds.)
  • Bennie Griffin
  • Howard Pepper — probably: Willie Howard Peppers registered for the World War II draft in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 16 February 1914 in Durham, N.C.; lived at 508 Stantonsburg Street, Wilson; worked for the Town of Wilson at its city lot; and his contact was wife Mary Edna Peppers. (The card lists him as 5’6″, 150 pounds, but the registrar noted: “believe 5’8″ weight 170.”)

The obituary of Lauraetta J. Taylor.

Lauraetta J. Taylor (1916-1977), daughter of Russell Buxton and Viola Gaither Taylor, was a legendary women’s basketball coach at Fayetteville State University. A gymnasium on campus is named in her honor.

Pittsburgh Courier, 26 March 1977.

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In the 1920 census of Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina: on Johnston Bow, preacher Russell B. Taylor, 35; wife Viola, 31, seamstress; and children Beatrice, 7, Janett, 5, and Sarah, 1.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on East Nash Street, Methodist minister Russell B. Taylor, 48, widower; children Laura, 14, Sarah, 11, Christopher, 7, and William, 4; daughter Beatrice Barnes, 18, public school teacher, and her son Elroy, 1; and lodgers Cora Speight, 49, laundress, and Mamie Williams, 30, ironer, and Roscoe McCoy, 32, farm laborer.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 536 East Nash, preacher and public school teacher Russell B. Taylor, 52; children Loretta, 23, and Sarah, 21, both teachers, Leonard, 16, and William, 14; grandson Elroy Barnes, 11; and lodgers Isiar Jones, 36, Virginia-born construction laborer; Mitchell Frazier, 32, South Carolina-born truck driver; John Baldwin, 29, Lumberton, N.C.-born tobacco redrying factory laborer, and his wife Clyde, 26, a native of Wilmington, N.C.

1939 edition of The Ayantee, the yearbook of North Carolina State A.&T. University in Greensboro. Taylor’s sister Sarah G. Taylor graduated from A.&T. that year.

How the Tobs got a bat boy.

It’s Opening Day of the 2018 Major League Baseball season. Wilson has hosted minor league teams since 1908; most called Tobs (for Tobacconists). In 1939, the year Fleming Stadium opened, Wilson was a member of the Class D Coastal Plain League.

Wilson Daily Times, 17 August 1939.

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In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 715 Stantonsburg Street, hospital orderly Calvin Swinson, 31; wife Alice, 25; and children Jesse, 6, Calvin Jr., 3, and Earlean, 1.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: hospital orderly Calvin Swinson, 41; wife Alice, 35; and children Jessie, 15, Calvin, 12, Earlean, 11, Horace, 9, Soisetta, 6, and Charles, 2.

[Note that, like many newspapers of the era, the Daily Times exaggerated the speech of African-Americans no matter that Southern whites also spoke a heavily accented dialect.]

 

Russell L. Darden.

“Russell Darden — front row, second from left, in his class at Biddle, now Johnson C. Smith.”

“… [O]ne of the first funerals under [Camillus and Arthur Darden‘s] direction was that of their younger brother, Russell, who was in his last year at Howard University Law School. Russell had gone to New York City to look for adventure during the Christmas vacation. While there, he caught pneumonia and died at Harlem Hospital before any of the family could reach him. Russell had been a daring, fun-loving, robust, athletic young man known for his prowess on the football field. [His brother Walter T. Darden remembered] that the last time he saw Russell play football was at Livingston[e] College. The score was Livingston[e] 3, Biddle 3. The ball was snapped and thrown to Russell. He was running hard. The opposition tried for the tackle but missed and tore off the seat of his pants instead. Oblivious to the cheers and laughter of the crowd, Russell kept running and won the game 9-3 with his rear end showing. He had an aggressive spirit and was the pride and joy of his family. His death left an aching gap in the family circle.”

N.J. and C. Darden, Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine (1978).

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: wheelwright Charles Dardin, 44; wife Dianna, 40, sewing; and children Annie, 21, sewing; Comilous, 15, tobacco stemmer; Arthor, 12; Artelia, 10; Russell, 5; and Walter, 4.

In the 1908 Wilson, N.C., city directory: Darden, Russell, carpenter, h 110 Pender. [At age 15?]

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: blacksmith Charlie Darden, 55; wife Dianah, 48; and children Cermillus, 24, bicycle shop owner; Arthur, 22, teacher; Artelia, 18, teacher; Russel, 16; and Walter, 14.

In the 1912 Wilson, N.C., city directory: Darden, Russell, porter, h 110 Pender.

In the 1913 Charlotte, N.C., city directory: Darden, Russell, bds [boards] Seversville.

In 1917, Russell Lenoir Darden registered for the World War I draft in Washington, D.C. Per his registration card, he was born 9 June 1893 in Wilson, N.C.; resided at 940 Westminster Street, Washington, D.C.; was a student; was single; and was stout and of medium height.

Russell Darden died 26 January 1918 in Manhattan, New York, New York.

A brief mention in the New York Age suggests that C.L. and Arthur could not, after all, bring themselves to bury their brother and called in Calvin E. Lightner of Raleigh to assist.

New York Age, 9 February 1918.