Crossroads township

Citizens are aiding him.

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Wilson Advance, 12 September 1889.

In the 1860 census of Kirby’s district, Wilson County: Jesse Ayres, 7, mulatto, is listed in the household of white farmer Lawrence Moors [to whom he likely had been bound as an apprentice.]

On 19 February 1871, Jesse Ayers, son of Sally Ayers, married Elizabeth Taylor, daughter of Lewis and Sally Taylor, in Wilson County. Their marriage is listed in the colored register.

In the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: 28 year-old farmer Jesse Ayers; wife Elizabeth, 28; and children Ida, 8; Harriet, 6; Howard, 5; and Hubbard, 2; all mulatto.

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Jesse Ayers, 53; wife Elizabeth, 54; and children Herbert, 19, Loutory, 15, Addie, 13, Alvester, 12, and Betsey A., 9; all black.

In the 1920 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Jessie Ayers, 59, and wife Pollie, 54, both white.

Jessie Ayers died 11 April 1940 in Taylors township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 80 years old; white; a widower; a farmer; had been born in Wilson County to unknown parents; and was buried in a family cemetery. Rufus Brewer was informant.

Cemeteries, no. 15: Living Hope Missionary Baptist Church.

This small cemetery, outside Lucama on Artis Road next to Living Hope Missionary Baptist Church, contains only eight marked graves.

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The earliest burial seems to be that of Rev. Clemon J. Phillips, one of the church’s pastors.

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Clement Phillips, 20, of Gardners township, son of Walter Phillips and Lizzie P. Edwards, married Estelle Farmer, 17, of Gardners, daughter of Jim Farmer and Mary F. Horne, on 4 December 1929 in Gardners. Elder Robert Edwards, a Primitive Baptist minister, performed the ceremony in the presence of Oscar Braswell, Jessie D. Pender and Elanzer Pender.

In the 1940 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: on Saratoga Macclesfield Road, farm laborer Clement Phillips, 28; wife Estelle, 27; and children Lula, 8, Mary L., 6, and Clement Jr., 5; plus uncle Ernest Blunt, 40.

In 1940, Clemant Phillips registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1912 in Norfolk, Virginia; was married to Estelle Phillips, Route 3, Stantonsburg; and worked for Lonnie C. Worrell, Route 3, Stantonsburg.

Clemon Phillips died 8 October 1973 in a car accident near Lucama, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 2 February 1912 to Walter Phillips and Lizzie Blount; was married to Estelle Minerva Farmer; and was a Protestant clergyman. He was buried at Living Hope Church cemetery.

Photographs by Lisa Y. Henderson, November 2016.

Cemeteries, no. 12: the Becky Pate cemetery. 

Just beyond the northeast edge of Lucama, down a sandy road closely bordered in mid-summer by four-foot tobacco plants bristling with green-gold leaves, is the Becky Pate cemetery. I did not see Rebecca Daniels Pate’s grave, but her Wilson County death certificate notes that she was born in 1827 in Wayne County to Arch and Leah Daniel; that she was the widow of Richard Pate; and that she died 31 March 1935 in Cross Roads township, Wilson County. [Census records indicate that she was more likely born about 1845.] Richard Pate died in Cross Roads township on 21 February 1935. His death certificate shows that he was born in about 1835 to unknown parents; was married; was a farmer; and was buried in Pate Daniel Grave Yard. It is probable that this is the same burial ground as Becky Pate cemetery and that the cemetery is located on land that once belonged to Arch Daniel.

  • William Henry Pate

In the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Leah Daniel, 69, and grandson Wm. Henry Pate, 7.

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer William H. Pate, 26; wife Rachael, 24; brother Jesse, 10; sister-in-law Nellie Peacock, 11.

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer William H. Pate, 36; wife Fichrel, 34; and brother Jesse, 20.

William Henry Pate registered for the World War I draft on 12 September 1918 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he lived at Route 3, Lucama; was born 11 February 1874; engaged in farming; and was married to Firchel Pate.

In the 1920 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer William H. Pate, 46, and wife Firchel, 44.

William Henry Pate died 24 October 1921 in Cross Roads township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 1873 in Wayne County to Alford Pate and Pollie Ann Daniel and was a farmer.

  • Mittie Daniel Dew


Mittie D. Dew was a granddaughter of Arch and Lear Daniel. Her murder is detailed here.

  • Polly Ann Artis Daniel

Polly Ann Artis Daniel was married to Isaac Daniel, grandson of Arch and Leah Daniel. (Polly is listed as Isaac’s first wife on his death certificate. And Rebecca Pate is listed as his mother.) Polly Ann died in 1908.

  • Benjamin Barefoot

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Mike Barefoot, 36; wife Caroline, 26; and children Olive, 12, Willie, 10, Rena, 8, Benjamin, 6, Ida, 4, Warren, 2, and Julia, 1.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Caroline Barefoot, 50, and children Ben, 21, Jula, 19, and Willie, 29.

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: on Railroad Street, Benjamin Barefoot, 28, brickyard laborer, and his companion William Williams, 35, also a brickyard laborer.

Ben Barefoot registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County on 12 September 1918. Per his registration card, he was born 15 January 1881; resided at Route 1, Lucama; worked for Sparse Renfrow; and his nearest relative was Wiley Barefoot.

  • Ed Manuel

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farm laborer Willis Adams, 65, and wife Jane, 65, plus Ed Manuel, 25, farm laborer.

Ed Manuel registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he resided in Lucama, Wilson County; was born 17 September 1879; worked as a farmer for E.B. Capps; and his nearest relative was Pinkney Williams, Florence, South Carolina.

In the 1920 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Ed Manuel, 30, farmer.

In the 1930 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Edd Manuel, 49, farmer.

In the 1940 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Edd Manuel, 61, farmhand.

Ed Manuel died 19 September 1944 in Fayetteville, Cross Creek township, Cumberland County, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was single; born in South Carolina about 1885; worked as a farmer; and was buried in Beckie Pate cemetery, Wilson County. Informant was Hubert Knight, Route 2, Wilson.

The obituary of Tobias Dew.

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Wilson Daily Times, 30 April 1947.

In the 1880 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Isaac Dew, 30; wife Esther, 24; children Annie, 12, Willie, 9, Tobias, 8, Martha, 4, Lesie, 3, and Laura, 2; plus farmer Burden Barnes, 28, and his wife Delphina, 19, who were white.

On 20 May 1918, Tobe Dew, 45, of Crossroads township, son of Isaac and Easter Dew, married Ardella Scarboro, 25, of Crossroads township, daughter of John and Ardella Scarboro of Oxford, North Carolina, at the courthouse in Wilson.

Toby Dew registered for the World War I draft on 12 September 1918:

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In the 1920 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Tobey Dew, 40; wife Ardella S., 26; and children Anna, 9, and Easter, 6; sisters Martha, 30, and Georgia, 28; and widowed mother Easter, 60.

In the 1930 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: Tobie Dew, 52, farmer; wife Ardella, 36; and daughter Eva, 14.

On 3 January 1933, James Arthur Bynum, 25, of Crossroads township, son of Ora Bell Bynum, married Eva Dew, 18, of Crossroads, daughter of Tobie and Ardella Dew in Wilson. Elder Arthur Fuller of the Holiness church performed the ceremony in the presence of L.L. Harvey, Stephen Coleman, and Andrew Rountree.

In the 1940 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farm laborer Tobey Dew, 67; wife Ardella, 46; granddaughter Thelma, 9; and widower cousin Gabriel Hooks, 75.

Tobie Dew died 28 April 1947 in Crossroads township Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was married to Ardella Dew; born 10 May 1874 in Wilson County to Isaac Dew and Easter Barnes; and had been engaged in farming. Della Dew was informant.

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Friendship Primitive Baptist Church today, just west of Lucama. The church was among those lead by Elder Fate Melton.

The Hawleys, the Roses and the color line.

The families of William and Nancy Rose Hawley illustrate the fluidity of identity along the color line and the complexity of Southern race relations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Their families lived among a cluster of families in the Lucama area — Hawleys, Roses, Ayerses and Taylors — whose members’ racial classifications shifted back and forth over time. Both William and Nancy were regarded as mixed-race for much of their lives, but died white.

In the 1850 census of District 9, Johnston County: John Sillivant, 53, farmer; Sally Hawley, 60; and Martha Hawley, 35, and her children Nancy, 12, William, 9, Mary, and Elizabeth, 3. All were described as white.

Also in the 1850 census of District 9, Johnston County: Sarah Rose, 44, and children Piety, 22, William 11, Nancy, 3, and James, 0. All were described as white.

Piety Rose married Noah Lynch on 2 March 1853 in Edgecombe County. [Lynch was probably a brother of Wyatt Lynch.]

In the 1860 census of Kirbys district, Wilson County: Sallie Hawley, 75; daughter Patsey [nickname for Martha], 35; and grandchildren William, 17, Mary, 14, Cerenia, 10, Willey, 4, Saffira, 4, and John D., 1. Patsey, Cerenia and John were described as mulatto; the others, white. [Kirby’s district had been the north-most part of Johnston County before Wilson County was created in 1855.]

Also in the 1860 census of Kirbys district, Wilson County: Sarah Rose, 50; Richard Odom, 21, cooper; Willis Taylor, 45, turpentine worker; Nancy Rose, 11, and Alice Rose, 7. Taylor and the Rose girls were described as mulatto. Sarah reported owning $500 real estate and $300 personal.

In the 1860 census of Town of Wilson, Wilson County: plasterer Noah Lynch, 30; wife Piety, 33, washerwoman; domestic Julia Higgins, 20; John James, 10; and Martha Taylor, 7; all mulatto. Noah reported owning $700 in real property.

On 26 June 1867, William Hawley, son of Joseph Hair and Patsey Hawley, married Nancy Rose, daughter of Sarah Rose, at Sarah Rose’s house in Wilson County.

In the 1870 census of Spring Hill township, Wilson County: farmer William Hawley, 28, wife Nancy, 20, son Joseph, 1, and Aquilla Hawley, 17. William, Joseph and Aquilla were classified as mulatto; Nancy, as white.

In the 1870 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Patsey Hawley, 40; and children Betsey, 18, Rena, 17, Willie, 16, Quilly, 16, and John D., 10; all white. Next door: Sarah Rose, 59, and daughter Alice, 15, both described as white. Next door to them: Willis Taylor, 51, farm laborer, white.

On 26 February 1874, Piety Lynch, 40, and Raiford Edwards, 52, both colored, both of Smithfield, were married in Johnston County. The ceremony was performed at J.B. Alford’s in the presence of Daniel Alford, Bettie Alford, and Daniel Freeman.

In the 1880 census of Spring Hill township, Wilson County: farmer William Hawley, 39, wife Nancy, 32, and children Joseph, 10, Sally An, 7, and John, 3; all described as mulatto.

In the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Patsey Hawley, 60, and grandson Charles Anderson Hawley, 11, both mulatto. Willis Taylor, 70, farmer, mulatto — who had lived with the Roses in 1860 — lived next door. Next door to him: farmer Leonidas Adams, 38, his wife Alice, 25, and children Willis, 8, Junius, 7, Mary Ann, 5, and John, 2; plus Piety Lynch, 54, and John E. Denson, 30, a fruit tree seller. All were mulatto except Denson, who was white. (Alice Adams and Piety Lynch were Nancy Rose Hawley’s sisters.) Also in Cross Roads, widow Sarah Rose, 72, living alone, described as white.

[Also in the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, this cluster of families: #162. Sylvia Hawley, 22, with children Paul, 3, and Minnie, 2; #163. Martha Ann Hawley, 25, with children Chalmus, 5, and Maud, 2 months; #164. Quillie Hawley, 25, with children William, 5, and Victoria, 2; #165. Patrick Hawley, 35, wife Polly, 29, and children Mary Jane, 9, and Penelope, 5; and #166. John Dancy Adams, 54, Martha Ann Hawley, 45, Pharo Rowe, 30, and Dudley Hawley, 22. All were classified mulatto except John D. Adams and Pharo Rowe. Quillie appears to be Patsey Hawley’s daughter Aquilla. Dudley was Patsey’s son John Dudley Hawley. John D. Adams was the father of Alice Rose Adams’ husband Oleander Adams. In the 1860 census of Kirby’s, Patrick Hawley and the elder Martha Ann Hawley were listed as Patrick and Martha Taylor in John D. Adams’ household, and Sylvia Hawley and the younger Martha Ann Hawley were Taylors in the household of William Taylor, 22, and Sallie Taylor, 30 (who were probably siblings.) All were mulatto in this census, but race-fluid as demonstrated in other records. Who were these people? Were they related to Sally and Patsey Hawley? To the Roses? To Willis Taylor?]

Sarah Rose executed her will in early 1888:

I Sarah Rose of the County of Wilson and state of North Carolina being of sound mind and memory, but considering the uncertainty of my earthly existence, do make and declare this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following that is to say: —

First – That my executor (hereinafter named) shall provide for my body a decent burial, suitable to the wishes of my relations and friend, and pay all funeral expenses together with my just debts howsoever and to whomsoever owing out of the moneys that may first come in to his hands as a part or parcel of my estate.

Second I want my land sold to the highest bidder for cash and pay the same to my last will & testament here after mentioned. Also my personal property All that may be found at my death sold as above written and apply the same to all my heirs.

3rd I give to my son John Rose twenty dollars to be paied to him and his personal representative for ever. 4th I give to my Daughter Pity Linch five dollars to be paied to her. My daughter Allice Adams I want to give her twenty five dollars to be paied to her or her personal representative.

After those above mention received what I have given them my will is to equally divide the balance among William Rose, Mary Alford, and Nancy Holley.

And lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my trusty son in law William Holley my lawful executor to all intents and purposes, to execute this my last Will and Testament according to the true intent and meaning of the same and every part and clause thereof hereby revoking and declaring utterly void all others wills and testaments by me heretofore made in witness whereof I the said Sarah Rose do hereunto set my hand and seal. This the 14th day of March A.D. 1888  Sarah (X) Rose

Signed sealed published and declared by the saied Sarah Rose to be her last Will and Testament in the presence of us who at her request and in her presence do subscribe our names as witness thereunto  /s/ J.T Renfrow, A.G. Price

In the 1900 census of Spring Hill township, Wilson County: William R. Hawley Sr., 60, wife Nancy, 52, and children Willie, 15, and Patience, 13. All were described as black.

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Leander Adams, 46, and wife Alice, 46, both black.

In the 1900 census of Smithfield, Johnston County: widow Piety Lynch, 72, black, living alone.

In the 1910 census of Spring Hill township, Wilson County: on Lucama Branch Road, William M. Hawley, 69, wife Nancy, 62, and daughter Patience, 22; all described as mulatto.

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: railroad laborer Arnold Adams, 67, wife Alice, 57, and widower son John, 35, a brickyard laborer; all mulatto.

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Ainley Adams, 711, and wife Alice R. Adams, both white.

William Hawley executed his will in 1913:

In the name of God, Amen, I, William Hawley of the county of Wilson and state of North Carolina being of sound mind and memory do hereby make, publish and declare this my last will and testament hereby revoking all former Wills by me at any time heretofore made, and as to my worldly estate and all the property real or personal which I may die seized and possessed I devise, bequeath and dispose thereof in the following manner, that is to say –

First – My will is that all of my just debts and funeral expenses shall be paid out of my estate by my executor hereinafter named as soon after my decease as by him shall be found convenient.

Item 1st. I give devise and bequeath to my beloved wife Nancy Hawley all of my real estate for and during her lifetime or widowhood, the said lands being situated in the county and state aforesaid in two tracts – the first tract being the land whereon I now low bounded on the west by the lands of Luke Tedder, on the north by Arch Atkinson and M.B. Hinnant, on the east by the lands of B.A. Scott and on the south by Jethro Moore containing Eighty Eight acres more or less, also one other tract of land adjoining the lands of J.T. Rentfrow, Seth W. Scott, B.A. Scott and others containing Seventy five acres more of less and known as the Sarah Rose tract – all of which I hereby give to my said wife Nancy Hawley for and during her lifetime or widowhood as aforesaid. I also give devise and bequeath to her all of my person al property not otherwise herein disposed of to-wit – all of my household and kitchen furniture, all of my live stock and all farming tools and all other personal property except such personal property as I may herein dispose of otherwise. 

Item 2. I give, devise, and bequeath to my beloved daughter Sallie Tedder all of the following land by and after the decease of my said wife Nancy Hawley, bounded as follows: Beginning at a stake at the crook of the ditch in Bull Pond Branch and runs north to a corner to be made in Arch Atkinson’s line, thence southwesterly with Atkinson’s line to Luke Tedder and Jethro Moore’s corner, thence easterly with Jethro Moore’s line to the head of the ditch in Bull Pond branch thence north with the ditch about 100 yeards to the beginning, containing thirty acres more or less, to her the said Sallie Tedder and her heirs by and after the decease of the said Nancy Hawley as aforesaid, provided however that one eight of an acre of this land be reserved to my family as a Graveyard for myself and family.

Item 3rd. I give, devise, and bequeath unto my son J.G. Hawley one hundred and fifty Dollars in money to be paid to him by my executor hereinafter named out of my estate. I also give to him the said J.G. Hawley one feather bed, bedstead and furniture.

Item 4th. I give, devise, and bequeath unto my son John Hawley One Hundred and fifty Dollars in money to be paid to him by my executor hereinafter named out of my estate. I also give to him one feather bed, bedstead and furniture.

Item 5th. I give, devise, and bequeath unto my son Willie Hawley the following described tract of land by and after the decease of his mother the said Nancy Hawley, bounded on the West by the lands of Benajah Scott, and on the north by Isaac W. Lamm and on the East by the lands of Haywood Lamm and on the south by J.T. Rentfrow containing Seventy five acres more or less, the same being known as the Sarah Rose place, to him the said Willie Hawley and his heirs in fee simple forever. I also give to him the said Willie Hawley one feather bed, Bedstead and furniture.

Item 6. I lend to my daughter Patience Taylor for and during her lifetime only the following described tract of land. Beginning at a stake in the Bull Pond Branch in Joseph Tedder and Adolph Taylor’s line and runs thence westerly to Sallie Tedder’s corner, thence northerly with her line to Arch Atkinson line thence a northeasterly course with Atkinson’s line to Mary Ann Hinnant’s deed line thence with said Hinnant’s line easterly to the Road thence south with the Road to creak below the Tobacco Barn thence a south line to the beginning containing twenty-five acres more or less to her the said Patience Taylor for and during her lifetime only and after her decease I hereby give  the same to such children as she may have born of her body if any living and if no children living then to her Brothers and sisters then living. I also give to her the said Patience Taylor, one feather Bed, Bedstead and furniture.

Item 7. All of the property which I may die seized and possessed not herein disposed of or any personal property herein bequeathed to my wife Nancy Hawley, and not disposed of by her during her lifetime, I desire the same to be sold by my executor hereinafter named, and after my said sons J.G. Hawley and John Hawley receive the sums of one hundred and fifty Dollars each as herein provided in the third and fourth Items of this my last will, I desire that the remainder of the proceeds of said sale be equally divided between my daughter Sallie Tedder and my daughter Patience Hawley and my son Willie Hawley share and share alike, and lastly I do hereby nominate and appoint my friend John T. Revell to be sole executor to this my last will and testament to all intents and purposes thereof. In testimony whereof I the said William Hawley have hereunto set my hand and seal this 13th day of January 1913.  /s/ Wm. Hawley.

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said William Hawley to be his last will and testament in the presence of us as witnesses hereto.  /s/  John T. Revell, Sarah Revell

In the 1920 census of Spring Hill township, Wilson County: on Aycocks Crossing Road, William M. Hawley, 77, and wife Nancy, 73, both mulatto.

William Hawley died 22 March 1920 in Spring Hill township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born in Wilson County to unnamed parents; was married to Nancy Hawley; was a farmer; was buried at the home place; and was declared white. J.S. Tedder was informant. [Per Findagrave.com, he was buried in the J.D. Hawley cemetery near Rock Ridge, North Carolina. Others buried there are Nancy Rose Hawley, William A. Hawley, Sarah Rose and Sally Hawley Tedder.]

Alice Adams died 1 June 1927 in Cross Roads township. Per her death certificate, she was about 70 years old; was born in Wilson County to Sarah Rose and Willis Taylor; was married to Onley Adams; and worked for Ambrose Loucas. She was colored. Informant was John Adams, Lucama. [Alice Adams’ death record reveals the relationship between Sarah Rose and her close neighbor, Willis Taylor, who presumably was also the father of Rose’s other mixed-race children.]

Nancy Hawley died 14 February 1935 in Spring Hill township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was the widow of the late W.M. Hawley, was born 8 December 1837 in Wilson County to an unknown father and Sarah Rose, and was white. J.S. Tedder was informant.

John Dudley Hawley [brother of William Hawley] died 27 September 1948 at his home at 407 Factory Street in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was a widower; was born in Wilson County to unnamed parents; and was white. Informant was Miss Maggie Hawley.

In death, William and Nancy Rose Hawley’s children, like their parents, achieved the permanent crossing of the color line that had eluded them in life:

Sally Ann Hawley Tedder died 11 June 1945 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 November 1872 in Wilson County to William Hawley and Nancy Rose and was a resident of Lucama. Informant Mrs. Berry Lewis certified that Sally Ann was white.

William A. Hawley died 14 March 1948 in Goldsboro, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was a 64 year-old barber; resided in Lucama; was born in Wilson County to William Hawley and Nancy Rose; and was white. J.S. Tedder was informant, and William was buried in Hawley cemetery.

Pattie Hawley Taylor died 14 May 1972 in Monroe, Union County, North Carolina. Per her death certificate, she was 85 years old, white, widowed, and the daughter of William Wilson Hawley and Nancy Rose. Informant was Grace Sasser, Monroe.

On the other hand, Alice Rose Adams’ children died classified as “colored,” like their mother:

Junious Adams died 25 September 1926 in Wilson township, Wilson County. His address was a rural route near Lucama. Per his death certificate, he was born about 1871 in Wilson County to Leander Adams and Alice Rose; worked as a tenant farmer for Josiah Hinnant; was married to Susan Adams; and was colored. Informant was Willis Adams, Black Creek.

Willis D. Adams died 4 July 1942 in Black Creek township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was about 68 years old; was born in Wilson County to Leander Adams and Alice Rose; was a farmer; was married to Eva Adams; and was colored. Informant was Eva Adams.

John Q. Adams died 23 September 1964 at Dew’s Rest Home in Wilson. Per his death certificate, his regular residence was Lucama; he was born 20 May 1879 in Wilson County to Onley Adams and Alice Rose; had worked as a farmer; was a widower; and was Negro. Informant was Ollie Adams Sr., Norfolk, Virginia.

 

 

In observance of Veterans Day.

3-21-1911

Wilson Daily Times, 21 March 1911.

On 12 June 1866, Richard Pate married Rebecca Daniel in Wayne County.

In the 1870 census of Goldsboro township, Wayne County: farm laborer Richard Pate, 37, wife Becky, 32, and daughter Polly, 12. [Next door was a household headed by white farmer Brtant Pate, 48, and nearby were other white Pates. Perhaps Richard’s former owner was one.]

In the 1880 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: Richard Pate, 36, wife Rebecca, 36, and daughter(?) Trecinda, 3.

In the 1900 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Richard Pate, 59, and wife Rebecca, 57.

In the 1910 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Richard Pate, 74, wife Rebecca, 72, and grandchildren Louis Daniel, 30, Roscoe Barnes, 12, and Leanne Barnes, 10.

Richard Pate died 21 March 1915 in Crossroads township. Per his death certificate, he was born in 1855, worked as a farmer, and was buried in the Pete Daniels graveyard. William H. Pate was informant.

——

3-14-1919

Wilson Daily Times, 14 March 1919.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: printing office laborer Charlie Thomas, 49, wife Sarah, 44, and children Elton, 20, hack driver, Lizzie, 18, carpenter (?), Louis, 15, Hattie M., 11, Mary, 5, and Sarah, 18 months. Elton Thomas died 15 December 1970 in Goldsboro, aged 79.

Dave Barnes was the son of Dave and Della Hines Barnes. He died 12 May 1966 at the Veterans Hospital in Durham, North Carolina.

John Parker Battle was the son of Parker and Ella Burston Battle. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: foundry laborer Parker Battle, 54, wife Ella, and children Roberta, 24, a teacher, Grace, 22, a factory laborer, and John, 19.

Charlie Austin was, in fact, Charles Alston. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: day laborer James H. Alston, 29, wife Martha, 28, and children Eula Lee, 6, and Charley, 4. Charles S. Alston eventually migrated to Newark, New Jersey, where he was living when he registered for the draft of World War II.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Richard Parker, 73, wife Lottie, 71, daughter Elizabeth, 27, son David, 28, and grandchildren Moses, 10, and William Henry, 8.

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World War I draft registration card of Moses Parker.

—–

8-2-1919

News & Observer (Raleigh), 2 August 1919.

Charles Barnes was the son of Wesley and Ella Mercer Barnes. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on the N.&S. Railroad, drayman West Barnes, 22, wife Ella, 47, laundress, and children Sylvester, 17, drayman, Viola, 15, cook, and Charlie, 13, laborer at wholesale store, plus son-in-law James Watson, 23, drayman, wife Lucy, 22, cook, and children West, 4, and Lucy, 3 months. Charlie Barnes died of tuberculosis at an Army hospital in Asheville.

——

ny-age-8-8-42

New York Age, 8 August 1942.

Matthew Stanley Gilliam Jr. was the son of Dr. Matthew and Annie Davis Gilliam.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: filling station attendant Herman Gilliam, 20; his widowed mother Annie, 48, a cook in a private home; and brothers Charles, 28, a waiter at Cherry Hotel, Stanley, 26, a teacher, and George, 22, a janitor at Carolina Theatre.

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World War II draft registration card of Matthew S. Gilliam.

M.S. Gilliam died of a heart attack at a Veterans Administration hospital in Petersburg, Virginia, on 7 March 1978. He was 64 years old.

U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

White man marries negro.

Raleigh_N_amp_O_4_5_1895_John_W_Proctor

Raleigh News & Observer, 5 April 1895.

In the 1880 census of Spring Hill, Wilson County: farmer Polly Proctor, 43, and her sons John W., 20, and Charly T., 12. On 19 September 1894, John Proctor, 34, son of John and Polly Proctor, married Hattie Ayers, 20, daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth Ayers, in Wilson. Husband and wife were described as white.

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However, in the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: 28 year-old farmer Jesse Ayers; Elizabeth, 28; Ida, 8; Harriet, 6; Howard, 5; and Hubbard, 2; all described as mulatto. In the 1900 census, the family (with younger children Loutory, Addie, Alvester, and Betsey A. Ayers) is black, and Jesse Ayers and Elizabeth Taylor’s marriage license is recorded in the colored register. When their son Howard Ayers married Elizabeth Taylor, daughter of Patrick and Polly Taylor, on 19 September 1894, and their marriage license describes them as “mixed.” However, the marriage licenses of Jesse and Elizabeth’s children Herbert, Loutoria, Alvester and Addie describe them as white. Elizabeth Ayers’ 4 April 1929 Wilson County death certificate describes her as white, as does Herbert Ayers’ 22 February 1957 Nash County certificate. Jesse and Elizabeth’s daughters Della Ayers Batts and Addie Ayers Collier also died as white women.

I have found no further record of  John and Harriet Ayers Proctor.

To give my heirs that has not been heard from since the Surrender time to come in.

007640343_00053

007640343_00054

I, Arch Daniel, of the County of Wilson State of North Carolina being of Sound mind and Memory but considering the uncertainty of my Earthly Existance, do make and declare This my last Will and Testament and form Following to Wit

To Say

First that my Executor Hearafter named shall provide for My Body a decent burial Suite to the wishes of my Relations and friends and pay all funeral Expenses to gather with my Just Debtes to those and to Whomsoever owing out of Monies that may first come into his hands as a part or parcel of my estate to satisfy all of Debtes at my death

Item Firste

I give and divide to my Beloved wife Learh all of my Tract of Land whear I live containing of Sixty acres more or Less I give my said wife Learh all of personal property of Each and of Every Kind to the value of five cents that I may be in possession of at my death to have and to hold the life time and widowhood

Item Second

I give and Bequeath to [her?] Bodily heirs after the Death of my Self and wife all of my real estate and All of my Personall property to be Equal devided a monge the aforesaid heirs If They can be heard from at that time It is my will that there be no division in any of my Estate less than ten years to give my heirs that has not been heard from since the Surrender time to Come in for there equal parte of my Estates

And Lastly

I Do hearby constitute and appoint my friend Thos. A. Thompson my lawful Executor to all intents and purposes to execute this my last Will and testament acording to the true intent and meaning of the Same and every part and claim There of nearby revoking and declairing utterly avoid all other wills and testaments bye me Before maid

In witness whearfore I the Said Arch Daniel hereunto Set my hand and Seal this 29th day of March A.D. 1875    Arch (X) Daniel {seal}

Signed Sealed published and Delivered bye the Said Arch Daniel and to be last will and testament In the presents of us who at his Requests and in his presents do Subscribe our naims as witnesses Thereunto    /s/ Elias Barnes, M.V. Pate

——

Arch Daniel and Leah Daniel had been married 35 years when they registered their cohabitation in Wilson County on 27 August 1866. In the 1870 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County, 65 year-old farm laborer Arch Daniel and 54 year-old wife Leah shared their home with Isaac, 12, and Margrett Daniel, 8. The children were likely their grandchildren.

Isaac Daniel, 21, married Zillah Odum, 21, on 14 March 1875 at Black Creek. Fifteen days later, ten years after Emancipation, Arch Daniel made out his will.

Margaret Daniel, 16, married Lenard Barnes, 23, on 3 May 1877 at Arch Daniel’s home. Arch died not long after, and his will was proven in court on 18 July 1877. Apparently, none of his lost children returned, and Leah Daniel and Rebecca Pate were declared his sole heirs. Leah remained on the land and is listed in the 1880 census of Crossroads township with grandson Wm. Henry Pate, 7.

Rebecca Pate, widow of Richard Pate and daughter of Arch and Lear Daniel, died in 1935 in Crossroads at the reputed (and exaggerated) age of 108.

Isaac Daniel died 1937 in Crossroads. His death certificate lists his birthday as 10 January 1857 and his parents as Archie Daniel (who was actually likely his grandfather) and Rebecca Pate. It also lists two deceased wives, Polly Ann Artis and Katherine Pace. (But not Zillah Odum.)

North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database on-line], Ancestry.com.

[I come across a lot of painful material in researching for this blog, but this about broke my heart. A decade after Emancipation, Arch Daniel’s will requests that his estate settlement be delayed ten years in order to give his children — lost in the slave trade — time to come home. — LYH]