Education

Lincoln U. students.

From the Catalogue of Lincoln University 1920-’21:

Sophomore class

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In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: wagon factory laborer Willie Paulkin, 26, wife Pearl, 22, son Atric, 2, and brother Sam, 24, also a wagon factory laborer; plus Wash Joyner, 35, house painter, wife Sarah, 32, laundress, and son Alexander, 13.

In 1917, Alexander B. Joyner registered for the World War I draft in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 616 Viola Street, Wilson; was single; and worked as a chair pusher for Shill Company in Atlantic City. He was described as medium height and build.

Alexander Barnes Joyner registered for the World War II draft in New York, New York, in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 249 West 139th Street, New York; his contact was “George Joyner (wife),” and he worked for the W.P.A., 70 Columbus Avenue, New York.

Freshman class

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: postmaster Samuel H. Vick, 37; wife Annie M., 28; and children Elba L., 17, and Daniel L., 3; plus cousin Bessie Parker, 15.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: dealer in real estate Samuel Vick, 47; wife Annie, 38; and children Elma, 17, Daniel L., 13, Samuel E., 10, George, 7, Anna, 5, and Robert, 2.

In 1918, Daniel Leon Vick registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1897 in Wilson; resided at 623 Green Street; his father was born in Nash County, North Carolina; he worked for S.H. Vick; and S.H. Vick was his nearest relative. He was described as short and medium build.

In the 1920 census of Washington, D.C.: at 1455 W Street N.W., North Carolina-born Daniel Vick, 22, boarded in the household of Charles L. Jones. He worked as an office building messenger.

Daniel L. Vick registered for the World War II draft in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1898 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 125 North 58th Street, Philadelphia; his contact was Mrs. Annie M. Vick, 622 East Green Street, Wilson; and he worked for John Wilds, 4035 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

Charm and talent at Hampton Institute.

Pittsburgh Courier, 7 November 1942.

Hampton Institute’s 1942 freshman class included Parthenia Robinson of Wilson, right, a member of the Kampus Kamera Klub.

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In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 202 Vick Street, barber Golden Robinson, 30; wife Bertie, 23; and children Parthenia, 5, Gold M., 3, and Glean, 1.

On 7 June 1951 in Nottoway County, Virginia, Anne Parthenia Robinson, 25, daughter of Goldwyn Robinson and Bertie Parks, born in Wilson, resident of Washington, D.C., married Berkeley Graham Burrell, 31, son of Hayward G. Burrell and Fannie Mae Miles, born in Washington, D.C., and a soldier at Camp Pickett, Virginia.

Send-off at Calvary.

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The Africo-American Presbyterian, 15 September 1938.

Class of ’34 reunion.

Wilson Daily Times, 7 June 1984.

  • Rosemyer Savage Lathan (1916-2001)
  • Mamie Taylor Alexander (1915-2008)
  • Francis Artis Edmundson — Frances Percell Artis Edmundson (1915-1992), daughter of William M. and Etta Diggs Artis, who lived in Nahunta township, Wayne County, North Carolina.
  • Vivian Grissom Garner
  • Ada Harris Christian — Ada Odell Harris Christian (1913-1992), daughter of Alus and Martha E. Harris.
  • Daisy Winstead Powell
  • Margaret Battle Thompson
  • Jesse C. Lassiter Jr. — Jesse C. Knight Lassiter Jr. (1914-1989), son of Jesse C.K. and Lessie Dew Lassiter.
  • Jesse Lindsey — John Jesse Lee Lindsey (1914-1994), son of Phil O. and Lugenia Hawkins Lindsey.
  • Rhoda Hinnant Brown — Rhoda Vandelia Hinnant Brown (1914-2004), daughter of Dock and Ardelia Reid Hinnant.
  • Amanda Artis Jones — Amanda Bell Artis Jones (1916-2006), daughter of June S. and Ethel Becton Artis.
  • Virginia Artis Reid — Virginia Maye Artis Reid (1917-2006), daughter of Lawrence and Emma Hedgepeth Artis.
  • Gladys F. McCollum — (1913-1998), daughter of Eddie and Rosa McCollum.
  • James Clinton Bess Jr. — (1915-2002), son of Clinton and Minnie Lockhart Bess.
  • Otho Davis — Otha Richardson Davis (1912-2009), son of Otha C. and Ella H. Davis.
  • Lucille Jones Peterson — Lucille Soisette Jones Peterson (1917-2005), daughter of Wesley and Martha Taylor Jones.
  • Robert F. Sheridan — son of Robert and Fannie McCollum Sheridan.
  • Ida Harris Sherrod — (1914-1990), daughter of Leander and Lucy Brooks Harris.
  • E.M. Barnes — Edward Morrison Barnes (1905-2003), son of Lemon and Elizabeth Barnes.
  • Mary D. Wilkins Bass — Mary Della Wilkins Bass (1909-1988), daughter of Redden S. and Mary Hines Wilkins.
  • Beatrice T. Barnes — Beatrice Taylor Barnes (1912-1995), daughter of Russell B. and Viola Gaither Taylor.
  • Charles Darden James — (1914-1994), son of Randall R. and Lizzie Darden James.

The Pope-Morisey wedding.

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Pittsburgh Courier, 8 January 1938.

This blurb appears in the “Rocky Mount, N.C.” column of the Courier‘s 8 January 1938 society page. Per their marriage license, the wedding took place in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina. Juanita Marion Pope was the daughter of O.R. and Myrtle Pope of Rocky Mount, and Alfred Alexander Morisey was the son of Rev. A.A. and Mamie Morisey of Raleigh. The couple did not live in Wilson very long — had they met there? — and it is not clear whether they taught at Darden or the Sallie Barbour school (or in the county). Though they are not found in the 1940 census, the 1942 Raleigh city directory lists: Morisey A Alex (c; Juanita) news reporter h S Davie ter CH. By 1946, the couple is listed in the Greensboro city directory with Alex working in public relations for Bennett College (his wife’s alma mater) and Juanita for the Colored Division of the United States Employment Service. 

Morisey’s obituary, published 26 July 1979 in the Washington Post, sheds light on his accomplishments after his time in Wilson:

“A. Alexander Morisey, 65, a former director of public relations at Howard University who was one of the first black reporters to work for a white owned southern newspaper, died of cancer Monday in New York City hospital.

“Mr. Morisey worked for the Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal from 1949 to 1955 where he covered the black community and did general assignment reporting.

“Journal reporter Roy Thompson said, “Not a handful of people here remember after all these years, but blacks and whites in this town know a great deal more about one another than they did when Alex came to town, and he had a hand in this.”

“After working for the American Friends Service Committee, Mr. Morisey came to Washington and was public relations director at Howard University from 1967 to 1969.

“He left Howard to become public relations director of the Philadelphia Committee on Human Relations. Mr. Morisey joined the public relations staff of The New York Times in 1969, and was named public relations director two years later.

“Since 1973, he had been assistant for community relations to the president of Manhattan Community College in New York.

“Mr. Morisey was a native of Smithfield, N.C., and a graduate of Shaw University in Raleigh, N.C. He also did graduate work at American University.

“He is survived by his wife, Dr. Patricia Morisey, of the home in New York City; a son, A. Alexander Jr., of Philadelphia; two daughters Jean Alexander and Muriel Morisey, both of Washington; a stepson, Paul Garland, of New York City; a brother, John, of Philadelphia; a sister, Grace Jones, of Burlington, N.C., and three grandchildren.”

Studio shots, no. 15: Dardens and friends.

Lizzie Darden commemorating her high school graduation with Roderick Taylor (standing), her brother Camillus L. Darden (seated), and a friend (seated in Picture-Taking George W. Barnes‘ chair), circa 1903.

Photograph courtesy of N.J. and C. Darden, Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine (1978).

Leonard Medical School students.

James Arthur Cotton appears in Leonard Medical School‘s 1888-’89 catalog with a notation that he done his collegiate studies at Saint Augustine’s College. (Perhaps he did not finish, as the Directory of Deceased American Physicians, 1804-1929 lists him as a 1897 graduate of Chicago’s Harvey Medical College.

Lincoln University graduate Charles Hudson Bynum appears in the 1892-’93 Leonard Medical School catalog.