house fire

Elderly trio loses all in fire.

Wilson Daily Times, 21 January 1942.

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In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farm laborer John Hegans, 31; wife Sarah, 20; children John, 3, Nancy A., 2, and Amos, 10; and Susan Hagans, 40, farm worker.

On 26 October 1889, Amos Hagans, 31, of Cross Roads township, son of John Hagans and Eliza Rich, married Jane Fields, 18, of Cross Roads township, daughter of Washington and Julia Fields, at Ben Binum’s in Cross Roads township, Wilson County.

On 21 February 1900, Amos Hagins, 39, son of John Hagins and Eliza Rich, married Lillie Richardson, 17, daughter of John and Mollie Richardson, at Mollie Richardson’s in Cross Roads township.

In the 1910 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer Amos Hagans, 54; wife Lillie, 24; daughters Martha W., 5, and Mary E., 4; and hired man Oscar Talton, 13.

In the 1920 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: on Road to Horns Bridge, farmer Amos Hagan, 63; wife Lillie, 36; and daughters Martha, 14, and Mary, 13.

Martha McCoyie died 11 February 1923 in Cross Roads township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 17 years old; was married to Mack McCoyie; was born in Wilson County to Amos Hagans and Lillie Richardson; and was buried the family graveyard.

In the 1940 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: Amos Hagans, 83; wife Lillie, 54; and James Pate, 71. [Presumably, these are the three elderly people living in the house at the time of the fire. If so, Lillie Hagans’ age was exaggerated.]

Amos Heggins died 30 January 1943 in Springhill township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born in 1856 in Wilson County to John Heggins and Eliza Ricks; was married Lillie Heggins, age 56; and buried in Polly Watson cemetery near Lucama.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Mary Sims jailed for house fires.

Wilson Daily Times, 2 December 1935.

I have no further information about Mary Sims. There were few treatments for mental illness in the 1930s, and even fewer effective ones. Given the danger her alleged actions posed, it is possible that she was sent to the Eastern North Carolina Insane Asylum in Goldsboro (later known as Cherry Hospital), the state’s only psychiatric facility for African-Americans. 

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

 

 

James Woodard, 5, killed by fire.

Wilson Daily Times, 9 May 1932.

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Perhaps, in the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on a rented farm, farmer Mintus Woodard, 28; wife Mary L., 26; children Nancy, 6, Johnie L., 5, Willie, 4, James, 3, and Mary E., 1; and brothers Lonnie, 17, and Jim, 12.

I have not found James Woodard’s death certificate.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.