Migration

Where did they go?: Pennsylvania death certificates, no. 6.

The sixth in a series — Pennsylvania death certificates for Wilson County natives:

  •  Clarence Bullock

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Georgia-born day laborer Will Bullock, 29; wife Martha, 27; and son Clarence W., 2, and Walter N., 8 months; half-siblings Alice, 12, and Mack Scott, 10; and boarder Will Bullock, 29.

  • Pearl E. Lindsey Carr

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: widowed schoolteacher Ida Lindsay, 30, and children Pearl, 8, Clara, 6, and Joseph, 4.

  • Mary Reid Chambliss

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  • George Clarke

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  • Edgar Edwards

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The Dardens of Montclair.

Montclair History: The Darden Sisters, Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine

by Frank Gerard Godlewski, baristanet.com, 14 April 2017

The Darden sisters, Norma Jean and Carol Darden Lloyd, currently living in Manhattan, have immortalized their magnificent Montclair home and family history in a 1978 book now reaching its fifth edition, Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine.

Their parents, Dr. Walter Darden and his wife Mamie Jean, had acquired their Montclair property at 266 Orange Road in 1946. The house employed a butler, a maid and a gardener. Dr. Darden built the garden apartment complex behind their home as a business venture.

Dr. Darden, was born in Wilson, N.C. He was an alumnus of Livingstone College in Salisbury, N.C., and of the Howard University Medical School in Washington. He moved to Newark to join a colleague and stayed on in private practice. He was one of the first black men to be a guest in the audience of the then-segregated Cotton Club of Harlem where he acted as physician.

Among his patients, friends and Montclair houseguests were Sara Vaughn, Lena Horne, Billy Eckstein, the Duke Ellington band, as well as Sammy Davis Junior. From the sports world, Larry Doby, Jackie Robinson, Monte Irving and the Newark Eagles baseball team that meet frequently at the Darden house. The Dardens with Harold Shot and Congressman Peter Rodino did fundraising and organizing for the Montclair chapter of the NAACP. The Dardens were also affiliates of education pioneer Mary McCleod Bethune and hosted her often in their home in Montclair.

Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine intends to be a historical family cookbook, but it is of even greater value as it presents an exceptional social history. Norma Jean and Carole Darden also have two restaurants in Harlem – Miss Mamie’s at 366 W. 110th St., named after her mother, and Mrs. Maude’s at 547 Lenox Ave., named after her aunt.

Both graduates of Sarah Lawrence, Carole was a social worker, Norma, a Wilhemina model before they wrote the 1979 cookbook that launched them into the celebrity food world.

The recipes and family stories in Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine came from their Southern roots: corn pone, spareribs, peach cobbler, banana pudding. Their grandfather, Charles Darden born before the time of the Emancipation Proclamation, was a great inspiration also. Papa Darden, a former slave that became an undertaker, was quite known for his recipes for fruit based wines and pine needle beers.

A request to cook for a Channel Thirteen event led to the birth of the Darden Sister’s catering company. Catering has its own challenges they say, like one time they packed up Norma Jean’s Porsche in front of their home on Orange Road before doing a catering gig and the huge quantity of coleslaw began to create a big white puddle under the car. Another time, an order of fried chicken fell out of the back door of the delivery van and was stolen by onlookers waiting at a bus stop. Norma had to buy more chicken and two fryers and then find a hiding place where she could prepare it on the fly at the event. Years later, when a space opened next to the catering kitchen, it seemed natural to open a small restaurant.

When the cookbook came out, despite its glorious history, the Hahnes Department Store in Montclair declined to sell the book. In an interview on the Martha Stewart Show, where Norma Jean was presenting her story, she said that she had learned many recipes from her father. Stewart smiled and asked, “Oh, your father was a cook?” Norma Jean smiled back at Stewart who had apparently not read the book and replied, “No my father was a medical doctor.” The audience giggled.

Today, the Darden House is the lovingly preserved home of Senator Nia Gill, Thurston Briscoe, and Bradley Gill.

Studio shots, no. 13: David Creech.

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 David and Ruby Holt Creech.

In the 1920 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: on New Wilson and Raleigh Road, farmer Right Creech, 48; wife Sallie, 37; and children Willie, 19, James O., 17, Maomie, 18, Luther, 14, Lillie May, 11, Alex, 9, Elizabeth, 8, Beulah, 6, Gertrude, 3, and David, 1.

In the 1930 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer Wright Creech, 56; wife Sallie A., 47; and children Lillie M., 22, Elex, 20, Elizabeth, 18, Gertrude, 13, David, 11, Sallie, 8, Genava, 6, Addie L., 3.

In 1940, David Creech registered for the World War II draft in Washington, D.C. Per his registration card, he resided at 146 Randolph Place N.W.; had been born 10 July 1918 in Wilson, North Carolina; his contact was his mother, Sallie Ann Creech of Lucama, North Carolina; and he worked at Columbia Country Club in Chevy Chase, Maryland.

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David Creech.

Many thanks to Edith Garnett Jones for sharing these photographs of her uncle.

South Carolina roots: the Delaneys.

George and Maria Richburg Delaney were among the families who migrated north from South Carolina to settle in Wilson County in the first quarter of the 20th century. The Delaneys arrived from Clarendon County, South Carolina, about 1923, apparently having followed George’s brother William Mitchell Delaney.

George Allen Delaney Sr. (1894-1957).

Maria Richburg Delaney (1901-1982).

In the 1900 census of Concord township, Clarendon County, South Carolina: farmer Wash Delanie, 30; wife Maggie, 25; and children Larcy(?) M., 8, Geo. Allen, 6, Saml. H., 4, and William M., 2.

In the 1910 census of Concord township, Clarendon County, South Carolina: Was Delaney, 43; wife Maggie, 35; and children Luther, 18, George, 17, Samuel, 13, Mitch, 12, Henry, 9, Bertie, 8, Isiah, 4, Gusssie L., 2, and Orene, 11 months.

In the 1910 census of Santee township, Clarendon County, South Carolina: William Richburg, 35, farmer; wife Josephine, 35; and children Florence, 12, Charlotte, 9, William Jr., 7, Annie Lee, 3, and Brooks, 2; and Beauregard Cummings, 17.

George Delaney registered for the World War I draft in Clarendon County in 1917. Per his card, he lived in Davis Station, South Carolina; was born 11 October 1894 in Manning, South Carolina; worked as a farmer; and had a dependent wife and two children.

On 24 November 1923, Mitchell Delaney, 24, of Wilson, son of Wash and Maggie Delaney, married Willie Mae Clark, 19, daughter of Lee and Josephine Clark. Both sets of parents were from South Carolina. Missionary Baptist minister A.L.E. Weeks performed the service in Wilson in the presence of Essie Smith, Annie E. Weeks and Clara B. Cooke.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: bricklayer George Delaney, 34; wife Maria, 31; and children Esther, 14, Watson, 13, George Jr., 10, Harry L., 8, Willie L., 7, and Joyce, 2. The youngest two children were born in North Carolina; everyone else in South Carolina.

George Allen Delaney died 3 August 1957 at North Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill. Per his death certificate, he was born 11 October 1894 in South Carolina to George Delaney and Maggie Tyndall; worked as a brickmason; and was married to Maria Richburg.

Maria Richburg Delaney died 2 March 1982 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 7 March 1901 in Clarendon, South Carolina, to Willie Richburg and Josephine Sumpter; was widowed; and lived at 1402 Carolina Street.

Photos courtesy of Ancestry.com user Michael Delaney.

Neighborhood legend.

The Brutal Death of a Neighborhood Legend.

by Thomas Bell, Washington Post, 26 April 1990.

Seth Wilder, 88, was one of those old men who become neighborhood legends.

People saw him every day on his afternoon strolls or under the tree in front of his house, the same tree he planted when he moved his family here from a North Carolina farm 40 years ago.

Usually a friend would sit with him, and people would stop by and say hello. That’s the way he was — always making friends.

It’s also why his wife, Lillie Mae Wilder, didn’t think twice when he brought a stranger into their Capitol Hill Northeast home two weeks ago. The man she had never seen before followed her husband up the stairs to his bedroom.

There, he robbed Seth Wilder — and broke his neck, police and hospital officials say.

Seth Wilder, who would have turned 89 next month, died Tuesday, his big, six-foot frame strapped to a hospital bed.

For 12 days he could only blink his eyes. Doctors told the family that his chances for survival were a million to one, but his wife wouldn’t let the doctors shut off the machines that kept her husband alive. They had been married for 59 years.

Police say they have several suspects but have made no arrests in the case. They also say it was one of the most vicious attacks on an elderly person they have ever seen.

“It was an act of total brutality,” said 5th District Capt. Maralyn Hershey. “This man was defenseless and could offer no resistance.”

The crime has outraged the neighborhood, a changing middle-class community of longtime residents and young professionals. Elderly residents especially have been living in fear ever since the assault, said James Lawlor, who heads the local community association in Northeast.

He said one of Seth Wilder’s longtime friends has been walking around the street with a hammer “looking for the man who hurt his buddy.”

At a community meeting last week, Fred Raines, deputy chief of the 5th District, one of the busiest stations in the city, pledged to a crowd of 50 residents that he would find the man.

Police have interviewed dozens of neighborhood residents, including the men who live and work in a shelter for the homeless five houses away from the Wilder home on Maryland Avenue NE.

Wilder withdrew $500 in cash from a bank less than two blocks from his home early in the afternoon of April 13, according to bank records obtained by police. It was money he needed to buy a couple pairs of glasses, said his daughter, Callon Jacobs.

Police said the man followed Wilder home from that errand. His wife said she heard him and the man talking in hushed voices outside the front door. The stranger followed him inside and introduced himself. She doesn’t remember his name or what he looked like. The two men went upstairs, she said.

A few minutes later she saw the man leave “walking hard as he could,” she said.

Even then, Lillie Mae Wilder said, she didn’t think anything was wrong. About three hours later, their daughter came home and was chatting with her mother when she heard her father’s faint cry for help. She rushed up the stairs and found him on the foor, his head cocked down to the side.

“I said, ‘What happened, Daddy, did you fall?’

“He said, ‘No.’

“I said, ‘What happened?’

“He said, ‘A man came up here and choked me and took my money.’ ”

Jacobs said her father asked her to take off his shoes.

She said he never spoke a word after that.

“I don’t know what happened in that room,” she said. “That’s the thing I can’t deal with — what happened before and how afraid he must have been.”

——

Seth Wilder Sr. and Jr., Washington, D.C.

Many thanks to Eunice F., who posted a comment on a yesterday’s post about Seth Wilder reminding us that her uncle’s life was not defined by a single careless incident with tragic consequences. The Wilders relocated to Washington, D.C., after Seth Wilder’s release from prison. He became a fixture on his Capitol Hill street, and his 1990 murder shocked his neighborhood. In less than a week, a homeless man was arrested and charged with killing Wilder, but was released without indictment after spending eight months in jail.

Photo courtesy of Edith Jones Garnett.

South Carolina roots: Mary Viola Skeeters Brockington.

Mary Viola Skeeters Brockington (1889-1973).

The decades after the emergence of Wilson’s bright leaf tobacco market in the 1890s saw thousands of African-American migrants arrive seeking work beyond the farm. In particular, families from North and South Carolina’s Sandhill counties made their way to Wide Awake’s stemmeries and factories. Among them were James and Mary Viola Skeeters Brockington, who migrated from the Florence, South Carolina, area to the Lucama area circa 1924.

In the 1910 census of Florence County, South Carolina: John Brockington, 28, farm laborer; wife Viola, 24; and children James, 8, Grace, 6, Seretha, 4, Ivym 3, and Effy, 11 months.

John James Brockinton registered for the World War I draft in 1918 in Florence County, South Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born 9 December 1882; resided in Timmonsville, Florence County; worked as a farmer for Samuel E. Benton; and his nearest relative was Mary Brockinton.

On 8 January 1927, Seretha Brockington, 21, of Wilson, married Joe Gibson, 21, of Black Creek, in Wilson before witnesses John Brockington, William Farmer and H. Humphrey.

On 31 January 1929, James Brockington, 26, of Black Creek township, married Ida Carter, 20, of Springhill township, in Wilson. Their parents Nancy Carter, John Brockington and Mary Brockington witnessed.

In the 1930 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer John Brockington, 47; wife Mary, 47; children James, 27, Ethel, 18, Eulah Mae, 17, Irene, 14, Mamie, 13, Zollie, 10, Pearle, 8, and Bertha, 5; plus grandson John Ed Cooper, 2. All were described as born in South Carolina except Bertha (North Carolina) and John Ed (Michigan). Next door: Ivey Brockington, 21, and wife Eva, 18.

On 28 December 1931, Eula Mae Brockington, 18, of Black Creek, married J.D. Finch, 19, of Wilson, in Wilson. Witnesses were Joe Finch, Gertrude Finch and Mary Brockington.

On 26 March 1932, Ethel Brockington, 20, of Black Creek, daughter of John and Mary Brockington, married Joseph Sims, 21, of Cross Roads, son of Reddick and Bettie Sims, in Wilson in the presence of Mary Brockington, Joe Gibson and J.T. Stancil.

In the 1940 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: on a path between New Road and Smithfield Road, widowed farmer Mary Brogden, 54; children Zollie, 20, Pearl Lee, 18, and Bertha, 16; and grandson John Ed Cooper, 12. (Bertha was born in North Carolina John Ed in “Mitchion.” The others, in South Carolina.) Next door: Ivie Brogden, 30; wife Eva, 27; and children Mary Lee, 7, and Eddie, 6.

In 1940, Zollie Brockington registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 18 May 1919 in Timberville, South Carolina; his contact was his mother Mary Brockington; and he was self-employed.

In 1940, Ivie Brockington registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 27 March 1907 in Timberville, South Carolina; his contact was his wife Eva Brockington; and he was self-employed.

In 1942, Robert James Brockington registered for the World War II draft in Washington, D.C. Per his registration card, he was born 13 June 1903 in Florence, South Carolina; was married to Ida Brockington; resided at 1013-3rd Street, N.E.; and worked for Charles H. Thompkins,

Zollie Brockington died 25 December 1942 in an auto accident in Cross Roads township. Per his death certificate, he was born 25 September 1917 in Wilson County [sic] to John Brockington and Mary Sketters, both of Florence, South Carolina; was single; was a tenant farmer; and was buried at Mary  Grove.

James Brockington died 13 May 1947 in Cross Roads township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 13 June 1904 in Florence, South Carolina to John Brockington and Mary Sketters; was married to Ida Brockington; was a farmer; and was buried at Mary Grove church cemetery.

Mary Sketers Brockington died 26 February 1973 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 7 March 1893 in South Carolina to John and Magillia Sketers; was a widow; and lived at 910 East Vance Street. Mrs. Ethel Simms, 910 East Vance, was informant.

Ivie John Brockington died 21 January 1993 in Wilson County.

Eula Mae Sherrod died 27 November 2001 in Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 6 May 1911 in Sardis, South Carolina, to John Brockington and Mary Sketters.

Photograph courtesy of Ancestry.com user VAultmon.

Freeman brothers.

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Ernest Aaron Freeman (1890-1970) and Joseph Thomas Freeman (1894-1991) were sons of Julius F. and Eliza Daniels Freeman and younger brothers of Oliver N. Freeman and Julius F. Freeman Jr.

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Tom and Ernest Freeman.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: 56 year-old carpenter Julius Freeman, wife Eliza, 46, and children Elizabeth, 19, Nestus, 17, Junius, 11, Ernest, 9, Tom, 6, Daniel, 4, and Ruth, 4 months.

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Ernest A. Freeman.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: house carpenter Julius Freeman, 65; wife Eliza, 54; and children Nestus, 28, bricklayer; Ollie, 18, Daniel, 14, John, 7, Junius, 22, Ernest, 20, and Thomas, 17.

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Joseph T. Freeman.

Ernest Freeman registered for the World War I draft in Cleveland, Ohio. Per his registration card, he was born 3 November 1890 in Wilson, N.C.; resided at 2169 East 90th Street, Cleveland; worked as a sailor for the Pitts. Steam Ship Co. on the the steamer D.M. Clemson; and was single.

In the 1920 census of Cleveland, Ohio: at 2339 East 49th Street, steel foundry laborer Earnest Freeman, 30; wife Gertrude, 26; and daughter Gertrude, 11 months.

In the 1920 census of Los Angeles, California: at 1501 Essex Street, North Carolina-born post office clerk Joseph T. Freeman, 26, a lodger.

In the 1930 census of Cleveland, Ohio: at 2258 Ashland Road, factory clerk Earnest Freeman, 39; wife Gertrude, 35; and children Evelyn, 11, Eanest, 7, and Arthur J., 10 months; as well as boarder Myrtle Bufford, 35, a domestic servant. Freeman owned the house, valued at $4000, and rented apartments in it to two families.

In the 1930 census of Los Angeles, California: at 1220 – 33rd Street, mail clerk Joseph T. Freeman, 34, and wife Phyllis N., 31, cafe waitress. Joseph was born in North Carolina, and Phyllis was born in Minnesota to a Danish immigrant parent.

In the 1940 census of Cleveland, Ohio: at 2211 East 81st Street, National Steel foreman Ernest A. Freeman, 49; wife Gertrude; children Evelyn G. 21, Ernest Jr., 17, and Arthur J., 10.

In 1942, Earnest Aaron Freeman registered for the World War II draft in Cleveland. Per his registration card, he was born 3 November 1890 in Wilson, N.C.; resided at 2211 East 81st Street, Cleveland; worked for National Acme Company, East 131st and Coit Road; and his nearest relative was Mrs. Gertrude Freeman.

In 1942, Joseph Thomas Freeman registered for the World War II draft. Per his registration card, he lived at 1248 West Jefferson, Los Angeles; was born 31 July 1894, Wilson, North Carolina; worked for the U.S. Postal Department, Terminal Annex, Mary Street and Alameda Street, Los Angeles; and his contact was Mrs. Sophia Freeman.

Ernest A. Freeman died 17 December 1970 in Cleveland, Ohio.

Joseph T. Freeman died 8 February 1991 and was buried at Fort Bliss National Cemetery, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Photographs of Freeman boys and teenaged E. Freeman courtesy of Ancestry user JaFreeman34; photo of J.T. Freeman as young adult courtesy of Ancestry user rcbrown1592rcb; The Official Roster of Ohio Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines in the World War, 1917-18, The F.J. Heer Printing Co. (1926), online at Ancestry.com.

Retired master cabinetmaker.

JOHNIE W. JONES, 83, a retired master cabinetmaker with the General Services Administration and a resident of the Washington area since 1944, died of cancer July 8 at the home of a daughter in New Carrollton.

Mr. Jones, who lived in Washington, was born in Wilson County, N.C. He went to work for the federal government when he moved here.

In 1969, he received a plaque from Lyndon B. Johnson for work he did for the president as he was preparing to retire and move to Texas.

Mr. Jones’ wife, Marie Lofton Jones, died in 1954.

Survivors include six daughters, Cecelia J. Krider of New Carrollton, Ruby M. Drake and Annetta Jones, both of Washington, Shirley J. Rollins of Capitol Heights, Dr. Scarlette J. Wilson of San Francisco, and Joan J. Bullock of Upper Marlboro; two sons, Johnie W. Jones of Washington and Charles A. Jones of Capitol Heights; three sisters, Susie Carpenter and Ruth Hunter, both of Washington, and Naomi Lucas of Capitol Heights; one brother, Grover Jones of Sims, N.C.; 14 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

— Washington Post, 10 July 1987.

——

In the 1920 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: on Jones Hill Road, farmer J.A. [John Alsey] Jones, 42; wife Bettie, 28; and children Johnie W., 16, Grover, 7, Susie, 5, Maomie, 4, and Ruth, 1. [J.A. Jones, 34, son of John A. and Susan Jones, of Old Fields, married Bettie Hinnant, 21, daughter of Vandorn and Janie Hinnant, of Springhill township, on 5 May 1912. Missionary Baptist minister William H. Mitchiner performed the ceremony. (This was John Jones’ second marriage.)]

On 11 October 1926, John William Jones, 23, of Black Creek, married Marie Lofton, 18, of Black Creek. A. Bynum performed the ceremony in the presence of Sylvester Woodard, R.H. Lofton and J.A. Jones.

In the 1930 census of Black Creek, Wilson County: farmer John W. Jones, 26; wife Maria, 20, a farm laborer; and daughters Celie Mae, 3, and Ruby Lee, 2.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1107 Queen Street, tobacco factory carpenter Johnnie Jones, 36; wife Marie, 30, cook; and children Ruby Lee, 11, Cecilia, 13, Johnnie, 9, Charles, 7, Joan, 3, and Jacqueline, 1. Marie reported that she was born in Mount Olive, North Carolina.

In 1942, Johnie William Jones registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he resided at 1107 Queen Street; was born 18 September 1903 in Wilson; his contact person was Mrs. Marie Jones, 1107 Queen Street; and he was employed by Noy 4750 Housing Project, New River, Onslow County, North Carolina.

 

Loafers are not wanted here.

JOSEPH ELLIS.

I am from Wilson, N.C.; I have been here three weeks. I found employment readily, and a good home. I live and work with Mr. F.B. Gardner, a good farmer in Russell township, Putnam county. He pays me $13 per month until spring, and then he will give me more. I find him a very kind and good man to me in the way of accommodations. Mr. Gardner could not get possession of his own house for me until the first of March, but he procured from his brother-in-law, Mr. D. Evans, a good and comfortable house for us until he can get the use of his. I am well pleased with my situation, and like this country finely. I would not go back to North Carolina for any consideration, and I would advise all my friends in that State to come to this county, as they can better their condition. But they should not come unless they expect to do good work, as loafers are not wanted here.

——

In the 1880 census of Russell township, Putnam County, Indiana: laborer Joseph Ellis, 27, and wife Prissa, 23, both born in North Carolina.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: widowed day laborer Joseph Ellis, 48; son Theodore, 16, and daughters Margaret, 10, and Vera, 8.

Senate Report 693, Part 2, 2nd Session, 46th Congress.  Proceedings of the Select Committee of the United States Senate to Investigate the Causes of the Removal of the Negroes from the Southern States to the Northern States (1880).  U.S. Congressional Serial Set.

As different as chalk and cheese.

WILLIAM CROOM.

The man is working for Daniel Evans, near Russellville, Putnam County. He has a nice brick house to live in, has a nice garden spot, fire-wood, and a team to haul it, a milch-cow and food to feed her, and $15 in cash each month; in all, equivalent to about $24 a month. He is delighted with Indiana, and urges that all his people come to our State as soon as they can get there. In an interview with me, he said: “Neither you nor any other Republican in Greencastle ever said a word to me about voting, nor asked me how I was gaining to vote; nor have I known of your asking any of our people how they were going to vote. All that has been said to us was about finding us homes and work, and taking care of us. They have done all for us they could, and our people are grateful to them for it. None of us want to go back to North Carolina; neither does any man who is honest and has sound judgment. I would take my oath on that. Most of our people who have come here are religious. I belong to the Missionary Baptist church, and am a licensed preacher. I came here to better the condition of myself and family, and to raise them respectably. I have found it better than I expected. Indeed, I don’t think that I hardly deserve as good treatment as I have received and am still receiving. From my own experience, I know that my people in North Carolina could greatly better their condition by coming here, and if they knew the facts they would come.

In a subsequent interview Croom said:

“I came from Wilson County, North Carolina. Have been here several weeks. I came because I had heard that colored men could do better here than in North Carolina, and I find that it was a true statement. There is as much difference between there and here as there is between chalk and cheese. It is altogether different. Here we are men just like the whites, get good wages, have good homes, and there are good schools for our children. The climate is no worse for us here than there. I have not yet seen as cold weather in Indiana as I have seen in North Carolina. And then the people are so different. They are just as kind to us as they can be. It seems as though they can’t do enough for us.”

——

Possibly: William Croom died 17 July 1910 in Indianapolis, Center township, Marion County, Indiana. Per his death certificate, he was 57 years old; was born in North Carolina to Sam Croom and Cherry Latta; was married to Diana Croom; and was a farmer. He was buried in Mount Jackson cemetery.

Cora Allen died 9 November 1925 at Provident Sanitarium in Indianapolis, Center township, Marion County, Indiana. Per her death certificate, she was born 15 May 1884 in Indiana to William Croom and Diana Ellis, both of North Carolina and was married to James Allen. She was buried in Floral Park cemetery.

Senate Report 693, Part 2, 2nd Session, 46th Congress.  Proceedings of the Select Committee of the United States Senate to Investigate the Causes of the Removal of the Negroes from the Southern States to the Northern States (1880).  U.S. Congressional Serial Set.