Land

Views.

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View, Vick Street Houses, Wilson, North Carolina (1988).

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View, South Reid Street, Wilson, North Carolina (1988).

The top photo appears to depict the 300 block of South Vick Street and the bottom is probably the 200 block on South Reid Street, which runs parallel to Vick to the immediate east.

The Reid Street were demolished in the mid-1990s as part of the redevelopment project that created a new working-class neighborhood of affordable homes called Freeman Place. As shown on the Bing.com map below, almost all of the housing stock in the wedge between Nash and Hines Street was razed. The houses standing now were built in Phases I, II and III of the project. The 200 block of South Reid, however, remains empty.

freeman pl

The 300 block of South Vick, just across Hines Street from Freeman Place, is largely intact, and the shotgun houses circled above are those in the 1988 photograph. After several years of virtual abandonment, they have recently undergone extensive renovation.

Tim Buchman Photographs, 1988-1998 (MC00583), Preservation North Carolina, NCSU Libraries Rare & Unique Digital Collections.

One-third acre on Lodge Street to Susan Mitchell.

This deed made this the 14th June 1875 by Charles Battle and wife Leah to Susan Mitchell all of the County of Wilson and State of North Carolina Witnesseth that for and in consideration of the sum of five hundred dollars in hand paid the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged the said Charles Battle and wife Leah have bargained and sold and by these presents do bargain sell alien and convey to Susan Mitchell and her heirs that certain piece parcel or lot of land in Wilson on the continuation of Lodge street beginning at Thomas Johnstons line running thence at right angles with said Lodge street and along said Johnstons line seventy yards to a stake thence a line parallel with Lodge street sixty five feet to a stake then a line at right angles with said Street seventy yds, thence with the Street sixty five feet to the beginning containing one third of one acre more or less to have and to hold the same together with the improvements privileges and appurtenances there unto belonging to the said Susan Mitchell and her heirs and the Charles Battle and wife Leah do for themselves their heirs executors administrators and assigns covenants to and with the said Susan Mitchell her heirs executors administrators and assigns to warrant the title herein made against the lawful claims of all persons whomsoever. In testimony whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names and affixd our seals    Charles (X) Battle, Leah (X) Battle

—–

State of North Carolina, Wilson County } In the Probate Court.

On this the 11th day of June in the year 1875 before me H.C. Moss Judge of Probate for said County, personally appeared Charles Battle and Leah Battle persons described in, and who signed the annexed conveyance, and severally acknowledged the due execution thereof for the purpose therein expressed. And thereupon the said Leah Battle being by me privately examined apart from her said husband touching her voluntary consent thereto acknowledged that she executed the same freely and without fear or compulsion of her said husband and do now voluntarily assent thereto and hereby relinquish her right of dower in said land. Thereupon let the said Deed and this certificate be registered.   /s/ H.C. Moss, Probate Judge

Received & Registered June 19, 1875

——

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1880 census of Town of Wilson, Wilson County.

Deed Book 11, page 35, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office, Wilson.

Lynch’s 54 acres on Hominy Swamp.

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On 5 June 1860, Wyatt Lynch married Nicey Hall in Wilson County.

In the 1860 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: plasterer and brickmason Wyatt Lynch, 30, wife Caroline, 23, and daughter Frances, 3.

As revealed in this letter, while he was away at war, Captain Ruffin Barnes arranged with Wyatt Lynch for Lynch’s wife to live with Barnes’ wife and perform household chores. Caroline “Nicey” Lynch butted heads with Barnes’ wife, however, and Barnes advised that she be sent back home. Despite all, Barnes seemed anxious not to antagonize Lynch, as he emphasized that he would still supply Nicey Lynch with food supplies as promised.

In the 1870 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: brick maker Wyatt Lynch, 48, wife Nicey, 35, and children Harriet, 4, and John, 1.

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on the south side of the Plank Road, widow Nicy Lynch, 40, children Harriot, 13, John, 11, Noah, 9, Sammy, 7, and Mary Wyatt, 3, with mother-in-law Nancy Lynch, 98.

On 24 January 1899, Hattie Lynch, 33, of Wilson County, daughter of Wyatt and Nicy Lynch, married William Young, 46, of Wilson County, son of Manuel and Caroline Young of Mississippi. Primitive Baptist minister J.S. Woodard performed the ceremony.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg Road, widowed farmer Nicey Lynch, 60, daughters Harriet Young, 35, and Mary Rhodes, 23, and grandson John Rhodes, 2.

On 7 May 1905, Hattie Lynch, 39, daughter of John and Nicy Lynch, married Robert Dixon, 33, son of William and Charlotte Dixon, in Wilson County. Witnesses were D.F. Scott, Mary Rhoads, and Charley Edward.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg Road, farmer Robert Dickson, 37, wife Hattie, 46, mother-in-law Nicie Lynch, and nephew Johnnie Rhodes, 12.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg Road, farmer Reuben Ellis, 45, wife Mary, 42, and stepson John Hardy Rhoades, 21. Next door: farmer Robert Dixon, 52, and wife Hattie, 48.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg Road, farmer Richard Dickson, 37, wife Hattie, 46, mother-in-law Nicie Lynch, and nephew Johnnie Rhodes, 12.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg Road, farmer Ruben Ellis, 60, wife Mary, 62, and grandchildren James R., 17, and Charlie Rhodes, 15, and Cora Bell Ellis, 11. Next door: farmer Robert Dixon, 73, and wife Hattie, 73.

Apparently, Wyatt Lynch’s estate was divided and distributed only after Nicey Lynch’s death. Though the commissioners’ report refers to a map, none in fact is appended to the report in the Record of Land Divisions volume. It is possible, though, to locate very roughly Wyatt’s land by the references to Hominy Swamp in the report and Stantonsburg Road in census records.

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The encircled area is the approximate location of Lynch’s land, about 3 miles southeast of downtown Wilson, between Hominy Swamp and Old Stantonsburg Road.

Mary Wyatt Ellis died 10 October 1943 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 16 May 1876 in Wilson County to Wyatt Linch and Nicie L.; was married to Rubin Ellis; and was buried in a cemetery on the Lynch farm.

Harriet Hattie Dixon died 16 January 1958 in Wilson, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was a widow; was born 27 June 1865 in Wilson County to Wyatt Lynch and Nicie [last name unknown]; and had worked as farmer. Informant was Mrs. Hattie Anderson.

Hattie Dixon had executed a will on 1 December 1952, and it was filed in Wilson County Superior Court exactly one week after her death. She left 29 acres of land “about three miles southeasterly from the City of Wilson on the old Stantonsburg Road,” her mules and various tools and farm equipment to her great-niece Hattie Rhoades Anderson, and divided the rest of her estate among Anderson and Anderson’s siblings Carrie Dunham, James Rhoades and Charlie Rhoades. (They were the grandchildren of Hattie’s sister Mary Lynch Rhodes Ellis.) The land was comprised of acreage Hattie inherited from her father Wyatt Lynch, as well as from her late husband Robert Dixon.

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Record of Land Divisions, volume 78, page 215, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office, Wilson; map courtesy of Google Maps; North Carolina Wills and Estates, 1665-1998 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Colored tax delinquents.

5-26-1911

Wilson Daily Times, 26 May 1911.

  • Thad. Arrington
  • Willie Austin — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: Austin William, farmer, h[ome] Mercer nr Mill rd
  • Ed. Barnes — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: Barnes Edward, painter, h 711 e Spring
  • Burt Bowser — Burt Bowser married Sarah Rountree, daughter of Peter and Lucinda Rountree, on 4 December 1888 in Wilson. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: shoemaker Peter Rountree, 76, wife Lucinda, 53, daughter Sarah Bowser, 32, son-in-law Burt L. Bowser, 36, grandsons Russell, 9, Astor B., 3, and Thomas F., 1, stepdaughters (?) Manda L., 18, and Rosa E. Rountree, 14. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: poolroom conductor Best Bowser, 48, wife Sarah, 40, a seamstress, sons Russell, 19, Astor B., 13, and Thomas F., 11, plus sister-in-law Rosa Rountree, 21, a teacher, and James Rountree, 14, a servant in a milliner’s store. In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: cook in cafe Bert L. Brown [sic], 56, wife Sarah M., 48, sons Astor B., 25, and Thomas, 23, and daughter-in-law Georgia B., 20, plus mother-in-law Lucinda Rountree, 78. Burt Landers Bowser died 12 July 1920 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 24 August 1861 in Halifax County, North Carolina, to Samuel and Isabella Bowser; was married to Sarah Bowser; and was a self-employed cook.
  • Oscar Best — Oscar Best is listed in the 1908 Wilson city directory as a grocer living at Nash near Bynum. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: carpenter Orange Best, 67, wife Hansey, 61, children Oscar, 37, a widowed grocer, Roberta, 22, Bethena, 19, Robert, 17, and granddaughter Sarah, 8.
  • Wright Barnes — Wright Barnes, son of Harry Taylor and Nelly Barnes, married Jane Strickland, daughter of Reddick and Mary Strickland, on 12 January 1868 in Wilson County. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Finches Mill Road, farmer Wright Barnes, 61, wife Jane, 58, children Mary A., 17, George, 15, and Jane, 14, and granddaughter Fannie, 13.
  • Sarah Battle 
  • Gen. Wash. Coppedge — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: Coppedge General, bricklayer, h 133 e Nash
  • J.G. Coppedge — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: Coppedge James G Rev, pastor Second Baptist Church, h 113 Manchester. James G. Coppedge died 16 July 1913 in Wilson. Per his death certificate: he was born in 1861 to Washington Coppedge and an unnamed mother; he resided on Manchester Street; and he worked as a butler. G.W. Coppedge was informant.
  • Wiley Farmer — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: Farmer Wiley, laborer, h Harper’s ln
  • Jesse Farmer
  • Chas. Hayswood — on 28 July 1901, Charlie Hayswood, 28, married Bettie Brinkley, 28, in Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony. Witnesses were Willie Barnes, Jane Branch and Sarah Alston. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg Street, Charles Hayswood, 36, factory fireman, and wife Bettie, 33, cook.
  • G. Wash. Joyner — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, painter, h 616 Viola
  • Levi Jones — Levi Hunter Jones. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Levi Jones, 32, barber, with sister Nancy, 24, brothers Butler, 28, house carpenter, and Harvey, 12, and mother, Susan Jones, 50.
  • Chas. Knight — on 26 December 1898, Charles Knight, 21, of Wilson County, married Elsie McCullows, 21, of Wilson County. Baptist minister W.T.H. Woodard performed the ceremony in the presence of Annie Jackson, Lizzie McCullers, and Florence Whitfield. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Charles Knight, 35, wife Elsie, 37, and sons Charles, 8, and Frank, 6, plus boarders Ethel Coleman, 23, and Sarah Jackson, 28, both school teachers. Charles Henry Knight registered for the World War I in September 1918. Per his registration card: he was born 12 February 1875; resided at 115 Pender Street; was a self-employed barber at 533 East Nash Street; his nearest relative was Elsie Knight; was tall and of medium build; and “has rheumatism very badly cannot walk well.” He signed his card with a shaky “C.H. Knight.”
  • Ed. McCullom — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: McCollum Edward, furniture repair, h 118 Manchester
  • Geo. Pender
  • Amos Pender — perhaps, in the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer Amos Pender, 60, and wife Annie, 59.
  • Ben. Parker or Parks — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: Parks Benj., laborer, h 623 e Nash
  • J. Wesley Rodgers — per the city directory, in 1922, John Wesley Rogers lived at 548 East Nash Street and worked as a porter at Oettinger’s department store. His wife,  a native of Johnston County, was Mary Elizabeth Thomas Rogers (1878-1950). Rogers was born in Durham County in 1870 and died in Wilson in 1951.
  • Isaac Thompson — on 3 June 1891, Isaac Thompson, 21, married Lizzie Davis, 23, at the Baptist church in Wilson. Rev. Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony before John Jeffreys, Samuel Williams and Wm. Baker. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 326 Spring Street, whitewasher Isaac Thompson, 40, wife Lizzie, 43, and children James, 19, Annie, 18, Edwin, 11, Ernest, 9, Herbert, 8, Rowland, 5, and Windford, 7 months.
  • John Williams
  • Allen Williams — in the 1908 Wilson city directory: Williams Allen, laborer, h Vance cor Vick
  • Alex Warren — Alexander Warren. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 367 Spring Street, ice factory blocker Alex Warren, 34, wife Ada, 36, and son John, 19, the latter two, factory workers. Alexander Warren died 4 January 1948 in Wilson. Per his death certificate: he was born about 1879 in Wilson County to Pompie and Della Warren; had worked as a laborer; resided at 403 E. Walnut Street; and was buried at Rountree cemetery. His neighbor John Parks of 405 E. Walnut was informant.
  • Ella Woodard
  • Junius Williams — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Winona Road, sawmill laborer Junius Williams, 33, and wife Mollie, 36, tobacco factory laborer. Junius Williams died 28 December 1941 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 August 1877 in Franklin County to Pompie Williams and Dora Stones of Franklin County; was married to Mollie Williams; worked as a cooper man at Watson Tobacco Company; lived at 1009 Atlantic Street; and was buried at Rountree cemetery.
  • C. Mack Wells — in the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: wheelwright Mack Wells, 40; wife Cherry, 38; and children Bertha, 11, Willie, 9, Clifton, 5, Lillie, 4, and Mary, 2.
  • S.H. Vick — Samuel H. Vick. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Samuel Vick, 47, dealer in real estate, wife Annie, 38, and children Elma, 16, Daniel L., 13, Samuel W., 10, George, 7, Anna, 5, and Robert, 2.

Real estate transfers.

wdt-10-10-1911

Wilson Daily Times, 10 October 1911.

  • Abram B. Simms — in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Abram Simms, 32, bricklayer, wife Mollie, 25, and children Annie, 7, and William, 4. On 31 December 1902, Abram B. Simms, 39, married Sue Wilkins, 37, in Wilson at Sue Wilkins’. Missionary Baptist minister W.M. Baker performed the ceremony.
  • Gilbert Stallings — in the 1908 Wilson city directory, Gilbert Stallings is listed as a farmer residing at 153 Suggs Street. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer Gilbert Stallings, 56, wife Annie, 50, and children Gilbert G., 19, Leonard, 16, and Georgia, 7. Gilbert Stallings died 13 August 1918 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 February 1854 in Franklin County to John Stallings and Hannah Ufferman; was married; and was a farmer. G.W. Stallings was informant.
  • S.H. Vick — Samuel H. Vick.
  • Nazareth Pierce — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 445 Goldsboro Street, Nazareth A. Pierce, 35, laborer, wife Ella, 34, laundress, and children Eugene, 9, Almada, 7, Leroy, 4, and Louis, 2. Nazareth Pierce died 16 February 1941 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born about 1877 in Franklin County, North Carolina, to Adam W. Pierce; lived at 415 East Green Street; was married to Ada A. Pierce; and worked as an insurance agent. He was buried in Rountree cemetery. Joseph L. Pierce was informant. An index of Social Security death claims lists his full name as Nazareth Andrew Pierce and his birth date as 15 June 1876.

The Home of Personal Service.

Columbus Estell “C.E.” Artis was born in 1886 near Eureka, Wayne County, North Carolina, to Adam T. Artis and his fourth wife, Amanda Aldridge Artis. Artis tried his hand at a number of businesses, including grocery stores and “eating houses,” before establishing what was arguably the #2 black funeral home (after Darden & Sons) in Wilson at mid-century.

In the 1900 census of Nahunta township, Wayne County, North Carolina: Adam Artice, a widowed farmer, appears with children Louetta, Robert, Columbus, Josephfene, June S., Lillie B., Henry B., Annie, Walter and William Artis.

In the 1910 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Columbus Artis, grocery storekeeper, 30, with brothers June Scott, 24, and Henry J. Artis, 16, box factory laborers, and two boarders, John Newson, 30, and Eliga Diggs, 16.

As filed with the Wilson County Register of Deeds, on 7 February 1912, W.S. Harriss filed a deed for the sale of property to Columbus E. Artis, for $225, i.e. one lot in Wilson township about 1/2 mile from the Town of Wilson, beginning at Julius Freeman‘s corner east to Plank Road and measuring 50 feet by 100 feet and another lot on Plank Road measuring the same.

As filed with the Wilson County Register of Deeds, on 27 September 1913, Wilson Insurance & Realty Company filed a deed for sale of property to Columbus E. Artis, for $350, at the corner of Vick and Nash Streets, known as Lot no. 8 in block A of the plat of the Rountree Tract.

The 1912-13 Wilson city directory listed “Artis Columbus E eating house 214 Goldsboro h 304 Jones.”

On 23 January 1914, E.T. Moore and wife Pearl filed a deed for sale of property to C.E. Artis, for $300, in the eastern suburbs of Wilson, adjoining the lands of C.E. Artis and W.P. Singletary, beginning on East Nash Street at the corner of Lot No. 6, 50 feet by 112 feet, designated Lot No. 7 of the division of the Rountree lands.

The following year the 1915 directory of the town of Wilson described Artis as an undertaker, with a home at 308 Pender Street and business at 571 East Nash. This was the long-term address of his funeral home, but it is not clear that he owned a business at that point. Artis spent several years in Washington D.C. during and after World War I, and on 4 July 1918, he married Diana A. Adams at 403 4th Street, N.W., in the city. Four months later, on 12 September 1918, he registered for the draft there. His card: Columbus Estell Artis.  Born 28 Aug 1885.  Resides 623 – 8th Street, N.E., Washington DC.  Letter carrier, Federal Government.  U.S. City Post Office, N. C[illegible] Mass. Ave.  Nearest relative, Ada L. Artis.  Medium height and build.  Blue eyes, black hair.

C.E. Artis seems to have been missed in the 1920 census, but death certificates and a 1922 newspaper article make references to Batts Brothers and Artis as local undertakers.

Further, he passed the state embalmer’s licensing exam in the spring of 1921:

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Concord Daily Tribune, 24 May 1921.

However, in the 1922-23 Wilson city directory, there is: Artis Columbus E propr[ietor] The Delicatessen h 308 Pender. The 1925 Wilson city directory carries this entry: ARTIS & FLANAGAN (C.E. Artis, W.E. Flanagan) funeral directors 563 E Nash phone 1183, and in the 1928 Wilson city directory, the multiple hats C.E. wore are clear: Artis Columbus E (c; Ada D), undtkr 571 E Nash and prop[rietor] Smith’s Filling Sta h 308 Pender.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County:  Columbus Artis, a merchant/undertaker, wife Ida, and niece Gladys Adams. Artis owned the house at 308 Pender Street, valued at $4000.

Over the next decade, at least twice Artis Funeral Home appeared in bizarre stories published in the Pittsburgh Courier:

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Pittsburgh Courier, 23 February 1935.

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Pittsburgh Courier, 1 August 1936.

(Interestingly, in that Jim Crow era, the Burnett family was white. In the 1930 census of Wilson , Wilson County: farmer Alex Burnett, 58, wife Lula, 51, son Festas, 20, and nephew Columbus Dawson, 16, all white.)

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: embalmer Columbus Artis, 55, and wife Ada D. Artis, 48.

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Carolina Times, 19 September 1942.

Artis also maintained a mutual burial association. Under state law, among other things, the purpose of mutual burial associations was to provide a funeral benefit for each member in merchandise and services, not cash.  Services were always to be provided by the official funeral director of the burial association of which the decedent was a member.

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Wilson Daily Times, 20 February 1951.

C.E.’s wife Ada D. Artis died 31 December 1950 at their home at 611 East Green Street. Her death certificate notes that she had been born 18 June 1891 in Brooks County, Georgia, to William and Elizabeth Troup Adams. She was buried in Rest Haven cemetery.

Columbus Estelle Artis died 18 March 1973 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 28 August 1886 to Adam T. Artis and Manda Aldridge; was a retired undertaker; and was married to Ruby Barber.  He was buried 22 March 1973, Rest Haven cemetery, Wilson, and the informant was Ruby B. Artis, 611 East Green Street, Wilson.

Here is C.E. Artis’ business described in 1979 in the National Register of Historic Places Inventory — Nomination Form for  “East Wilson Business Area,” Wilson Central Business and Tobacco Warehouse Historic District:

One of only two black funeral directors in Wilson, Columbus Estelle Artis (1886-1973) had this modest, one-story, three-storefront building [at 567-571 East Nash Street] erected in 1922. His funeral business occupied the 571 store until the mid 1950s when he retired and closed his business; the other two stores have always been used for rental purposes, except for a brief period from ca 1945 until ca 1951 when Artis expanded his funeral home into the 569 store. The stuccoed brick structure has narrow stores at 567 and 569 that contain a simple door and a large adjacent display window, both of which have transoms of clear glass. The store at 571 East Nash Street has a central door with flanking display windows, also with transoms. Unfortunately, all of the windows and three of the window transoms have been boarded up. The blind northwest elevation originally abutted the drug store occupied by Darcey C. Yancy during the 1940s and 1950s; this building was razed in the mid 1960s. The rear elevation of the Artis building has a one central door per store. The southeast elevation wall is adjacent to the Jackson Chapel First Missionary Baptist Church, which has maintained offices in the Artis building since 1980.

Historic designation notwithstanding, Jackson Chapel tore down the buildings in the 1990s to make way for a church expansion and parking lot.

[Sidenote: In his capacity as an undertaker, C.E. Artis’ distinctive wide-nibbed, angular cursive, sharp slashes marking his r’s, appears on hundreds of Wilson and surrounding County death certificates. Though his funeral home is largely forgotten, Artis has — quite literally — left a lasting imprint in Wilson County.

An early example, when his style was still emerging:

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A sample from 1945, when it was in full flower:

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The estate of Henderson Bagley.

Late in the winter of 1906, Henderson Bagley closed his eyes in death. Born a slave, perhaps in Nash County, he had defied odds to accumulate a sizeable estate in western Wilson County. Despite his advanced age, however, he died without a will, and his family stepped forward to ask the County Superior Court to appoint Samuel H. Vick as the estate’s administrator. Bagley’s widow, second wife Lenora, marked the petition with an X, but sons Nestus and Ruffin Bagley penned confident signatures. Notes at the bottom identified more heirs — Zilla Bagley Renfrow, Ida Jones, Etta Bagley and Allen Bagley‘s children Willie, Hattie, Sarah and Gertrude — and estimated the value of his property.

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On 7 March 1906, Vick filed an inventory of Bagley’s personal estate: a mule, a cart, a wagon, nine hogs, 17 geese, 25 chickens, about five barrels of corn, one and a half stacks of fodder, four feather beds, and some furniture, valued in total at $150; $458.35 received from the sale of timber; and $220.66 paid into the estate by son Ruffin. Vick noted that the heirs had decided that their stepmother should receive Bagley’s personal property as the year’s allowance due her as a widow.

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Two months later, three commissioners and a surveyor paced the irregular outlines of Bagley’s nearly 180 acres, dividing it into parcels of equal value for distribution to Bagley’s heirs. Here is their report:

NORTH CAROLINA, Wilson County  }  In the Superior Court, Before the Clerk.

Leno Bagley, widow, Zillia Rentfrow, Nestus Bagley and others, Ex Parte. }

Report of Commissioners.

To S.G. Mewborn, Clerk of the Superior Court of Wilson County:

Obedient to a summons of the sheriff of Wilson County, we, the undersigned commissioners appointed to divide and allot in severalty the lands of the petitioners, containing 178 3/5 acres, assembled on the premises in Old Fields Township, Wilson Co. on the 5th, day of June, 1906, and after being duly sworn, and proceeded to partition the lands among the said tenants in common, according to their prospective rights and interests therein, after first laying off and allotting to Leno Bagley, widow, her dower and thirds in the lands of Henderson Bagley, deceased, the metes and bounds of dower and of each share, being as follows (as will appear by reference to plat of same, filed herewith):

To Leno Bagley, widow of Henderson Bagley, deceased we allot the following tract of land, as her dower:

Beginning at a stake at (B), Wiley Pearson’s corner, thence to said Pearson’s line S. 85; 20 E. 20 chains and 44 links to a stake on the north side of a certain ditch, at (C) on plat; thence S. 4, 9 W. 14 chains and 37 links to a large black gum on a branch, at (D) on plat; thence S. 87; 30′ E. 6 chains and 19 links to a large pine, Wiley Pearson’s corer thence along an agreed line, with said Pearson, S. 4; 53′ E. 7 chains to a stake, at (E) on plat, corner of Lot No. 1, thence with the line of Lot No. 1, S. 87; 30′ W. 25 chains and 75 links to a stake, at (A), thence North 24 chains and 82 links to the first station, containing 40 8/10 acres.

Lot No. 1, assigned to Ruffin Bagley, consisting of two shares, 1st share in his own right and 2nd share in the right of his sister, Zilla Rentfrow, as per her deed to Ruffin Bagley, is described as follows:

Beginning at a stake, in Morgan’s line, at the intersection of said Morgan’s line and the Center of Avenue, thence with the center of said Avenue N. 87; 30′ E. 40 chains and 25 links to a stake on Wiley Pearson’s agreed line; thence along said agreed line, this day marked, S. 4; 53′ E. 10 chains and 50 links to a Bay, on the run of Juniper Swamp, then up the run of said swamp to the mouth of a ditch, Morgan’s corner; thence along Morgan’s line, N. 2 E. 18 chains and 25 links to the first station, containing 64 acres, and valued at $400.00.

Lot No. 2, assigned to Willie, Hattie, Sarah and Gertrude Bagley is composed of two tracts (2 and 5 on the map), first tract, being lot no. 2. is described as follows:

Beginning at a stake at intersection of Morgan’s line and the Avenue the beginning corner of Lot No. 1, thence along said Morgan’s line N. 2 E 34 chains and 25 links to a stake, said Morgan’s corner; thence S. 85; 50′ E 5 chains and 50 links to three pines, an old corner same course continued, 2 chains and 59 links to a stake, thence south 33 chains and 24 links to a stake, on the line of Lot No. 1, thence along said line S. 87; 30′ W. 8 chains and 30 links to the first  station, containing 33 9/10 acres; 2nd Tract, marked on plat No. 5, being in widow’s dower, is described as follows, Beginning at a large pine, Wiley Pearson’s corner, thence along said Pearson’s line S. 4; 53′ E. to a stake, corner of Lot No. 1, thence along line of Lot No. 1 S. 87; 30 W. 15 chains and 50 links to a stake S. 85 E. 10 chains and 19 links to a stake on the south side of a ditch, thence S. 4; 9′ W. 14 chains and 37 links to a large Black Gum, in a branch, thence S. 87; 30′ E. 6 chains and 19 links to the beginning, containing 23 4/10 acres, valued at $200.

Lot No. 3, assigned to Nestus Bagley, is composed of two tracts marked on plat no. 3 and 4, 1st tract is described as follows:

Beginning at three pines, thence N. 4; 30′ E. 9 chains and 71 links to a stake, thence S. 85 E, 8 chains and 50 links to a stake, thence S. 17 chains and 47 links to a stake, Pearson’s and the Dower corner, same course continued 24 chains and 82 links to a stake on line of Lot No. 1, thence along line of Lot No. 1. S. 87; 30′ W. 6 chains and 30 links to a stake, corner of Lot No. 2, thence along line of Lot No. 2, 33 chains and 24 links to a stake, thence N. 85; 50′ W. 2 chains and 59 links to the first station, containing  33 9/10 acres; 2nd tract, being on the Dower, and marked no. 4 on plat, is described as follows, Beginning at a stake at (B) on plat, Pearson’s corner, thence along Pearson’s line a stake, in line of Lot No. 1. thence along line of Lot No. 1, S. 87; 30’W 10 chains and 35 links to a stake, thence North 24 chains and 82 links to the beginning, containing 23 4/10 acres, valued at $200.00

The Plat, showing the above division, dated June 14, 1906, made by James W. Taylor Surveyor, is hereto attached and made a part of this report.

Respectfully submitted,  W.N. Glover, A.R. Taylor, N.W. Williams, Commissioners

This 20th day of June, 1906. A correct copy. S.G. Mewborn, C.S.C.

Bagley plat

—–

On 22 August 1866, Henderson Bagley and Hana Williams registered their cohabitation in Wilson County, thereby legitimating a marriage made during slavery.

In the 1870 census of Chesterfield, Nash County: Henderson Bagley, 40, and children Catherine, 15, Allen, 10, Zillie, 8, Nestus, 6, and Thomas R., 4.

In the 1880 census of Old Fields, Wilson County: farmer Henderson Bagley, 53, and children Allen, 21, Zillah, 18, Genestus, 17, and Ruffin, 14.

On 4 July 1880, Henderson Bagley, 50, married Lenora Jones, 25, in Wilson County. J.W. Smith, Cena Smith and D.J. Scott witnesses the ceremony, which was performed by a justice of the peace.

On 7 October 1880, Allen Bagley, 22, married Mary Rountree, 20, at Alfred Woodard‘s in Wilson County. [Mary Rountree and her sister Louisa, who married Allen’s younger brother Ruffin, were Alfred Woodard’s stepdaughters. They are listed in the household of their father Warren Rountree in the 1870 census of Wilson township with mother Sarah, and siblings Florence, Rhebecca, Howell, Sallie and Warren Jr. Alfred Woodard, his first wife Harriet and their children are listed next door. Alfred Woodard married Sarah Rountree on 13 February 1873.]

On 18 December 1884, Nestus Bagley, 22, married Margarett Coleman, 20, at Washington Farmer‘s with J.W. Turner, Oscar Jones and James Locus witnessing.

On 27 November 1889, Ruffin Bagley, 22, son of Henderson and Bethany Bagley, married Louisa Rountree, 20, daughter of Warren Rountree and Sarah Woodard, at Alfred Woodard’s in Wilson County. Witnesses were W.W. Rountree, Sam Winstead and Henry Deans.

In the 1900 census of Old Fields, Wilson County: farmer Henderson Bagley, 70, wife Lenora, 48, daughter Etta, 18, and grandchildren Lonna Locus, 8, Earnest Locus, 6, and Percy Locus, 2. Next door: Ruffin Bagley, 32, wife Luesah, 25, and son Arthar, 6.

Ruffin Bagley, age 50, died 30 December 1915 in Old Fields township, Wilson County, of gastritis. His death certificate lists his parents as Henderson Bagley and Fannie Williamson. Nestus Bagley was informant.

On 12 March 1933, Ida James, daughter of Henderson Bagley and Lena Jones, both of Wilson County, died of uterine cancer. Her death certificate reports that she was married to Thomas James.

North Carolina Wills and Estates, 1665-1998 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.comCommissioners’ Report at Plat Book 1, page 4, and plat at Plat Book 1, page 5, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office, Wilson.