Winstead

His twin brother’s testimony acquitted her.

On 6 May 1910, the Times separately noted (1) the arrest of Mattie Ham on a charge of stealing meat, tobacco, and other goods from George Dew and (2) the trial of Bernice Winstead, whose identical twin brother Ernest testified for him in the trial for a similar crime, committed in December 1909 against Dew.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 May 1910.

Four days later, a follow-up piece reconciles and clarifies the stories. Mattie Hamm lived in one room of a two-room house. After taking meat and flour from Dew’s smokehouse, Bernice Winstead stashed them in Hamm’s extra room, claiming they were his. Trackers later arrived at her door step. Frightened, Hamm rushed to Wilson to tell Winstead to move his stuff, then packed up all her own belongings and vacated the house. She was arrested anyway and charged with receiving stolen goods, but released after Ernest Winstead’s testimony cleared her.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 May 1910.

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  • Mattie Hamm
  • Bernice Winstead

In the 1880 census of Jackson township, Nash County: farmer Berry Winstead, 52; wife Loucinda, 48; children Sidney, 22, Riny, 18, Melviny, 16, Margaret, 14, William, 12, Charles, 9, and Ernest and Burnett, 6; grandchildren Julius, 4, and George, 2; and boarder Charlotte Winstead, 75.

[Sidenote: Bernice, pronounced BERniss, though not common, was a name most often given to boys in this area in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Eventually, female BerNEESE gained popularity. As is the case with most unisex names — think Gayle, Dana, Leslie, Ashley, Courtney — Bernice for boys soon disappeared.]

  • Ernest Winstead

On 27 October 1897, Ernest Winstead, 24, of Nash County, son of Berry and Louinda Winstead, married Martha Wright, 18, of Nash County, daughter of David and Elizabeth Wright, in Rocky Mount township, Nash County.

On 13 September 1903, Ernest Winstead, 27, of Taylors township, son of Berry and Lou Winstead, married Dora Deans, 18, of Nash County, daughter of Peter and Manda Deans, in Taylors township.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Finch Mill Road, laundress Martha Griswold, 50, widow; nephews Jeffrey, 20, brick moulder in brick yard, and Walter Hill, 15, odd jobs laborer; and lodgers Willie Simms, 20, brick moulder in brick yard, and Earnest Winstead, 36, widower, farm laborer.

In the 1920 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: tenant farmer Ernest Winstead, 49; wife Louisa, 41; and children Roosevelt, 18, Essie May, 17, Mildred, 15, William, 12, Enman, 8, Leodell, 6, Dona May, 3, Sherrod, 2, and Jesse, 3 months.

Louise Winstead died 6 June 1925 in Edenton township, Chowan County, N.C. Per her death certificate, she was 48 years old; was married to Ernest Winstead; was born in Wilson County to William Hyman and Lizzie Woodard; and was buried in Chowan County. Ernest Winstead, Edenton, was informant.

Ernest Winstead died 17 April 1952 at Mercy Hospital in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 74 years old; was born in Nash County to Berry and Lurenda Winstead; was married; worked as a carpenter and minister; and lived in Norfolk, Virginia. He was buried in Granite Point cemetery, Wilson County.

Closing exercises of the Colored Graded School.

Wilson Mirror, 9 May 1888.

Twenty-five year-old Samuel H. Vick had been teacher and principal at the Colored Graded School since shortly after his graduation from Lincoln University. A year after this graduation, he was appointed by President William H. Harrison to his first stint as Wilson postmaster, a highly sought-after political patronage position. Vick hired his old friend Braswell R. Winstead, with whom he had attended high school and college and taught at the Graded School, as assistant postmaster. Teacher A. Wilson Jones was married to Vick’s sister Nettie Vick Jones — and murdered her in 1897. Annie Washington was about 18 years old when this article was published. She and Samuel Vick married almost exactly four years later.

Lane Street Project: the “why” of what we do.

This morning, while driving to her home, Dale C. Winstead noticed Lane Street Project volunteers working at Odd Fellows Cemetery. She stopped to ask what was going on, then left and came back. When she returned, she offered this testimony:

Ms. Winstead’s father Elijah Winstead Sr. passed away in 2002. Her grandmother, Annie Jenkins Winstead, passed in 1941. It is almost certain that Annie Winstead was buried in Vick cemetery, and her headstone was among those removed when the city cleared the entire burial ground in 1994-95. Though the markers were to be catalogued and stored, per an unconfirmed report from a former employee, after a few years the city’s Public Works Department decided it needed the space. The department contacted those relatives they could find and asked them to pick the markers within a certain time. Otherwise, they would be destroyed.

Were you or anyone you know contacted circa 1995-2000 and asked about retrieving headstone taken from Rountree cemetery (the name by which most people called all three cemeteries)? If so, please contact Lisa Y. Henderson at blackwideawake@gmail.com. Thank you.

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On 14 March 1925, Marion Winstead, 22, of Edgecombe County, son of Jason and Hattie Winstead, married Annie Jenkins, 22, of Edgecombe County, daughter of Lizzie Jenkins, in Wilson County.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: at 604 Manchester, fertilizer plant laborer Marion Winstead, 29; wife Annie, 29; and children Elizabeth, 6, Elija, 4, Ollie M., 2, and Jason, 1.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: at 622 Wiggins, farm laborer Marion Winstead, 40; wife Annie, 40; and children Elizabeth, 16; Elijah, 14, Olie, 13, Jaison, 7, Robert, 5, Grace, 4, and Marion, 2.

Annie Winstead died 22 March 1941 at her home on Wiggins Street. Per her death certificate, she was born 16 June 1899 in Edgecombe County to Van and Lizzie Jenkins; was married to Marion Winstead; lived at 622 Wiggins Street; and was buried 24 March 1941 in Rountree cemetery. Dr. B.O. Barnes was the attending physician.

Sincere thanks to Dale C. Winstead for sharing your inspiration for volunteering with Lane Street Project and to Brittany N. Daniel for capturing her words. They have been posted with permission.

The obituary of Braswell R. Winstead, esteemed teacher.

Samuel H. Vick penned this memorial to his friend Braswell R. Winstead, his schoolmate at Wilson Academy and Lincoln University, his assistant postmaster, his fellow teacher and Mason, and his co-founder of Calvary Presbyterian.

Wilson Daily Times, 24 August 1928.

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Thanks to J. Robert Boykin III for sharing the clipping.

Funeral services for Mr. Johnnie Winstead.

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In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on State Highway, farmer Ned Winstead, 52, wife Annie, 47, and children Maggie, 18, Lizzie, 14, Daniel, 12, John, 9, Lee, 6, and Bryant, 4.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on State Highway, farmer Ned Winstead, 58, wife Annie, 50, and children Maggie, 23, John, 18, and Bryant, 13, plus granddaughter Annie Bell, 9.

Johnnie Winstead, 22, of Edgecombe County, son of Ned and Annie Winstead of Wilson County, married Carrie Lawrence, 22, of Edgecombe County, daughter of Allen and Carolina Lawrence, on 15 November 1922 in Edgecombe County.

In the 1930 census of Walnut Creek township, Edgecombe County: farmer Johnie Winstead, 30; wife Carrie, 27; and son Ananias, 5.

In the 1940 census of Portsmouth, Virginia: at 825 Lincoln Street, steamship company dockhand Johnnie Winstead, 39; wife Carrie, 40; and son A. Winstead, 16.

Funeral program courtesy of Lisa R.W. Sloan. 

A Service of Memory for Mrs. Edith Winstead Ward.

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Joe Ward, 23, of Stantonsburg, son of P.W. and Cherry Ward, married Edith B. Winstead, 18, of Stantonsburg, daughter of William Heath and Amanda W. Williams, on 13 May 1924 at Edith B. Winstead’s house in Stantonsburg. Witnesses were Willie F, W.H. Jones and Lavenia Jones, all of Stantonsburg.

James Herman Ward died 25 August 1928 in Stantonsburg township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 June 1927 in Wilson County to Joe Ward of Greene County and Edith Winstead or Wilson County. he was buried in Bethel graveyard.

In the 1930 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Joe Ward, 30, lumber company planer; wife Edith B., 22; and children Marie, 4, and Mildred, 2 months.

In the 1940 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Amanda Williams, 63, widow, domestic, and grandchildren William, 15, and Edward Jones, 11, and Marie, 14, Mildred, 10, Braxton, 9, and Preston Ward, 6.

Amanda Williams died 24 December 1955 in Stantonsburg township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 3 May 1883 in Pitt County to Isaac Winstead and Jane Winstead and was a widow. Informant was Edith Ward, Stantonsburg.

Joseph Ward died 19 September 1971 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 5 May 1896 to Perry Ward and Cherry Speight; was married to Edith Ward; lived at 919 Poplar Street, Wilson; and his informant was Mildred Kirby, 125 Powell Street, Wilson.

Funeral program courtesy of Lisa R.W. Sloan. 

Studio shots, no. 142: Minnie Locus Winstead.

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Minnie Locus Winstead (1895-1985).

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In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: tenant farmer Henry Locus, 36; wife Ida, 30; and children Minnie, 13, Joseph, 11, Lou, 9, Davis, 7, and Willie, 5.

Clarence Winstead, 20, of Nash County, son of Will and Mattie Winstead, married Minnie Locus, 18, daughter of Henry and Ida Locus, on 3 December 1914 in Taylors township. Baptist minister William Rodgers performed the ceremony in the presence of J.T. White, Eddie Farmer and Rosa B. White.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Clance Winstead, 22; wife Minnie, 23; and children William, 4, and Madie, 1.

In the 1930 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farm laborer Clarence Winstead, 35; wife Minnie, 38; and children William, 15, and Madie, 11.

In the 1940 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Clarence Winstead, 42; wife Minnie, 44; and adopted son Robert Featherson, 14.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry user cclemmiles.

A Winstead gathering.

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Lisa R. W. Sloan kindly shared this amazing photograph taken in Wilson County around the turn of the 20th century. Her great-great-grandfather Edward “Ned” Winstead is standing in the top row, third from right, with a book tucked under his arm. Her great-great-grandmother Annie Edwards Winstead is believed to be in the photo as well, but has not been identified. Nor have the others depicted, who may members of the extended Winstead family, who lived in the Elm City area. If you recognize anyone here, please let us know.

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In the 1870 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Anna Oats, 28, domestic servant; Milly, 16, domestic servant, Ned, 13, farm laborer, and Clara, 12, domestic servant; and John Batts, 22, retail liquor dealer.

In the 1880 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Fannie Parker, 51; daughter Martha, 28; grandsons Julius S., 10, and Joseph W., 4; nephew Ned Winstead, 22.

On 29 December 1886, Ned Winstead, 28, son of George Hodge, married Annie Edwards, 23, daughter of Orren and Sarah Edwards, at James Chisel’s house in Toisnot township.

In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer Ned Winstead, 42, wife Annie, 38, and children Hubbard, 12, James H., 10, Maggie, 8, Lizzie V., 4, William N.D., 2.

In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on State Highway, farmer Ned Winstead, 52, wife Annie, 47, and children Maggie, 18, Lizzie, 14, Daniel, 12, John, 9, Lee, 6, and Bryant, 4.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on State Highway, farmer Ned Winstead, 58, wife Annie, 50, and children Maggie, 23, John, 18, and Bryant, 13, plus granddaughter Annie Bell, 9.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer Ned Winstead, 60, widower; son-in-law Tom Wilcher, 48; daughter Maggie, 37; Carl Farmer, 23, son-in-law; daughter Lizzie, 33; and granddaughter Annie B., 19.

On 7 November 1931, in Smithfield, North Carolina, Bryant Winstead, 26, son of Ned and Annie Winstead, resident of Elm City, married Eva Green, 24, daughter of Neverson and Isabella Green, resident of Wilson.

Ned Winstead died 24 May 1934 in Elm City, Toisnot township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was a widower; was born 14 February 1858 in Nash County to George Hardy and Iseley Winstead; was a farmer; and was buried in Elm City. Maggie Wilcher was informant.

Perkins seized his corn.

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Bureau of Refugees Freedmen & Abd Lands, Sub Dist Goldsboro May 7/ 1867

Mr. John Perkins, Black Creek NC

Sir, Information has been received at this office that you seized one Bbl [barrel] and one stand of corn valued at $6.67 2/3 the property of Isaac Winsted to liquidate a debt due you from his father. You will please send to this office a written statement of the matter

Very Respectfully &c

O.E. Compton, Major USA Sub Asst Com


Pikeville N.C., June 1st 1867

O.E. Compton, Goldsboro N.C.

Sir, I have only yesterday 31st May received the within from you ishued 7th Inst. in reply I have to say that I rented or leased some land to Riched Winstead the father of Isaac & Prince Winsted. he Richard bout provisions of me in time that he was making the corn and pledged the corn to pay the amount at harves but before he paid me all he turned over or pretendidly give the corn to his Sones, but he had pledged me the corn to pay the amount, so I did not really take any of Isaac’s corn in his possession &c I can prove the above to be true by two witnesses.

Written by R.W. Perkins by request        Yours respectfully, John Perkins

——

  • John Perkins — Perkins, born in 1844, was a Confederate veteran, having enlisted in Company F, North Carolina 61st Infantry Regiment in 1862.
  • Isaac Winstead

In the 1870 census of Pikeville township, Wayne County: Richard Winstead, 80, farm laborer; wife Phillis, 57; and children Frank, 12, Anna, 6, and Isaac, 28.

On 27 April 1873, Isaac Winsted, 30, of Wilson County, married Caroline Batchelor, 30, of Nash County, in Taylors.

In the 1880 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Isaac Winstead, 38; wife Caroline, 38; children Lizzie, 12, and Jane, 8; and mother Phillis, 70.

In the 1920 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: on Nash Road, farm laborer Isaac Winstead, 79, and wife Calline, 75.

Isaac Winstead died 7 April 1920 in Taylors township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was married to Caroline Winstead; was 78 years old; his father was Dick Winstead; and he was a tenant farmer for J.S. Thompson. Informant was E.E. Winstead. (A duplicate certificate shows: Isaac Winstead died 7 April 1920 in Taylors township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was married to Caroline Winstead; was about 70 years old; was born in Wilson County; and he was a farmer for J.S. Thompson was informant.)

North Carolina Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1863-1872, Goldsboro (subassistant commissioner), Roll 15, Letters Received Jan 1867-Feb 1868; North Carolina Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1863-1872, Goldsboro (subassistant commissioner), Roll 16, Unregistered Letters Received Aug 1865-Feb 1868, http://www.familysearch.org