Washington Street

1213 Washington Street.

The one hundred-seventy-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; Hattie Sims house; bungalow with gable roof and prominent gable-front porch; asbestos veneer; Sims was a tobacco worker.”

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In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Simms Hattie (c) h 1213 Washington

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1213 Washington, owned and valued at $1500, Hattie Simms, 61, and sister Louvenier Hales, 55. Both worked in “green tobacco & tobacco factory.”

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Simms Hattie (c) tob wkr h 1213 Washington

Hattie Simms died 20 September 1943 at her home at 1213 Washington Street. Per her death certificate, she was 56 years old; was born in Wilson County to Ben Artis and Faribee Barnes; was married to James Simms; worked as a farm laborer; and was buried in Rountree cemetery.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hales Louvenia (c) dom h 1213 Washington [Louvenia Hales [or Hayes] died in 1947.]

Wilson Daily Times, 17 December 1949.

In the 1950 census of Wilson, North Carolina: at 1213 Washington Street, railroad mail carrier James M. Artis, 40, and wife Sarah F., 38, cook in domestic service.

James McKinley Artis died 7 April 1961 in Goldsboro, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born 4 August 1909 in Wilson to Wade Artis and Martha Gardner; was married to Sarah Artis; and lived at 1213 Washington Street. [James Artis’ father Wade Artis was a brother to Hattie Artis Simms and Louvenia Artis Hales.]

Sarah M. Artis died 16 January 1948 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 10 March 1908 in Gaston, North Carolina, to Walter McClure and Ella Lightner; was a widow; and lived at 1213 Washington. Informant was Marie Everette, 1213 Washington Street.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 December 1984.

Marie Everett inherited 1213 Washington Street from her aunt Sarah McClure Artis. The E emblazoned on the house’s storm door is her touch.

Detail from plat prepared for Marie Everett in 2003. Plat Book 32, page 69, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, June 2022.

1301 Washington Street.

The one hundred-fifty-sixth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; Albert Walden house; bungalow with gable-end form and subsidiary gable-roofed porch; aluminum sided; Walden was a chauffeur; contributing wood shed.”

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In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Walden Albert (c; Nannie) carp h 1301 Washington

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Walden Albert (c; Annie) carp h 1301 Washington; Walden Annie (c) cook Bissette’s h 1301 Washington

Albert Lee Walden died 9 January 1964 at his home at 1301 Washington Street. Per his death certificate, he was born 3 March 1893 in Northampton County, North Carolina, to John Walden and Mary Jane Robinson; was married; worked as a carpenter; and was a World War I veteran. Nannie Walden was informant.

902 Washington Street.

The one hundred-fifty-fifth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Presumably, this house is under renovation. Here, the original cedar shakes in the front gable are visible under an overlay of vinyl siding.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; bungalow with gable-end form and recessed entry.”

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Murphy Geo (c; Lucinda) lab h 902 Washington

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 902 Washington, rented for $16/month, George Murphey, 34, town laborer; wife Lucile, 33, laundress; and children Willie, 15, and Pearl, 13.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Fletcher Williams, 49, blacksmith at J.Y. Buchanan’s; wife Esther, 38, Carolina Laundry worker; and children Armina, 12, Gladys, 19, Virginia, 9, Fletcher Jr., 13, and Charles, 15. All were born in Goldsboro, N.C.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Williams Fletcher (c; Esther; 5) blksmith h 902 Washington

Wilson Daily Times, 16 January 1941.

In 1942, Fletcher Williams registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 24 August 1900 in Goldsboro, N.C.; lived at 902 Washington Street; his contact was sister Minnie Williams, Viola Street near High School; and he worked for “J.Y. Buchanan, Blacksmith Alley, back of Old Quinn Store” in “Alley between Clark Fac. & Old Quinn Furn. Sto.”

In 1942, Fletcher Williams Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 6 November 1925 in Goldsboro, N.C.; lived at 902 Washington Street; his contact was mother Esther Lee Williams, 902 Washington; and he had “been going to school.”

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Felman Walter C (c; Velma) lab h 902 Washington

1109 and 1109 1/2 Washington Street.

The one hundred-fifty-fourth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

These little endway houses seem to have begun life as twins. As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, 1109 is “ca. 1935; 1 story; shotgun with side wing” and 1109 1/2 is “ca. 1935; 1 story; brick-veneered and modernized shotgun.”

1109

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 Washington, rented for $13/month, Raymond Tillery, 27, waiter at Carolina General Hospital; wife Louise, 24, cook; and daughter Edna R., 2.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Tillery Raymond (c; Louise; 1) lab h 1109 Washington

In 1942, Raymond Ben Tillery registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 18 March 1913 in Wilson; lived at 1109 East Washington; his contact was Mrs. Raymond Ben Tillery; and he worked at Carolina General Hospital. 

White realtor George A. Barfoot advertised 1109 Washington for sale in 1948, noting that it was a good home for colored people.

Wilson Daily Times, 3 March 1948.

A month later, Barfoot dropped the price a bit and provided a little more detail about the house’s amenities.

Wilson Daily Times, 24 April 1948.

1109 1/2

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 1/2 Washington, rented for $13/month, taxi driver George Vick, 34, born in Wilson, and wife Blanche, 30, tobacco factory stemmer, born in Fayetteville.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Vick Geo (c; Blanch) taxi driver h 1109 1/2 Washington

In 1942, George White Vick registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 9 June 1903 in Wilson; lived at 1109 1/2 Washington; his contact was Mrs. S.H. Vick, 622 East Green; and he worked for Safety Taxi Company.

Photos by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2022.

1009 and 1011 Washington Street.

The one hundred-fifty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, 1009 Atlantic is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; shotgun with strong bungalow traits, including gable-end porch and shingle-shake gable; built as tenant housing by William Hines.”

1011 Atlantic is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; shotgun with strong bungalow traits; similar originally to #1011; also built Hines for tenants.”

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  • 1009

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C.: Bell James T (c; Pennie) barber Cherry Hotel Shop h 1009 Washington

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C.: Wright Mary (c) lndrs h 1009 Washington; also Wright Preston (c) h 1009 Washington

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1009 Washington, paying $6/month rent, Beatrice Ruffin, 25, tobacco factory stemmer; and, paying $12/month, Thomas Evans, 26, water department employee, Town of Wilson; wife Maggie, 27, tobacco factory stemmer; son Richard, 6; Coy Evans, 22, tobacco factory laborer, and James Evans, 20, farm laborer.

In 1940, Thomas Evans registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 24 April 1914 in Wilson; his contact was wife Maggie Evans; and he worked for the Town of Wilson.

In 1940, James Arthur Evans registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 24 July 1919 in Wilson County; lived at 1009 Washington Street; his contact was brother Thomas Evans Jr., 1009 Washington; and he worked for Josh Bryant, Route 2, Elm City, N.C.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Evans Thos (c; Maggie) lab h 1009 Washington

  • 1011

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C.: Floyd Ambrose (c; Mattie) drayman h 1011 Washington

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C.: Floyd Ambrose (c; Mattie) truck driver h 1011 Washington

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1009 Washington, rented for $17/month, taxi chauffeur Ambrose Floyd, 28; wife Mattie, 28; and children William A., 9, James, 8, Mateel, 6, Earnesteen, 5, and Hattie M., 1; and sister-in-law Hattie McLoran, 29, cook.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1011 Washington, Nathan Townsend, 43, born in Maxton, truck driver for retail coal company, and wife Narcissus, 44, born in Kenly, private cook.

In 1942, Nathan Townsend registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 15 July 1897 in Robeson County, N.C.; lived at 1011 East Washington; his contact was mother Sarah Townsend, Wagram, N.C.; and he worked for Bardin Coal Company, 701 Mercer Street, Wilson.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Townsend Nathan (c) driver Bardin Coal h 1011 Washington

1007 Washington Street, revisited.

We first examined the locally unusual gambrel-front house at 1007 Washington Street here. Built for William Hines as investment property, the house’s early tenants included Howard M. and E. Courtney Plummer Fitts and Oscar and Nora Reid. When I passed the house recently, the front door stood open, and I took a peek inside. 

The front door opens into a vestibule. A staircase rises at immediate left, reaches a landing and turns toward the second floor. I did not venture upstairs. A door into a front room lay to the right, and the door visible below led to a series of at least two directly connected rooms. 

The linoleum covering the floor of the entry way may be original to the house. 

In the front room, an original brick mantel and fireplace surround.

Photos by Lisa Y. Henderson, January 2022.

1006 Washington Street.

The one hundred thirty-fourth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; Bungalow with gable-end form and subsidiary gable-end porch.”

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In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Lamm Edward (Etta) (L&L Oldsmobile Co) h 1006 Washington. Edwin (not Edward) and Etta Bass Lamm were white. Why they were living in a solidly African-American residential block in 1928 is a mystery.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Murphy Josephine (c) cook h 1006 Washington

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1006 Washington, owned and valued at $3000, Josephine Murphy, 56, widow, washing, born in Bennettsville [, S.C.] and two roomers Herbert Hines, 35, hotel bell boy, and Aletha, 27, cook.

Josephine Murphy died 15 December 1951 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 70 years old; was born in Marlboro, S.C., to Edmond Stubbs and Donella Jackson; lived at 1006 East Washington Street; was a widow; and had lived in Wilson since 1930. She was buried in Macedonia Cemetery, Bennettsville. Josephine Williams was informant.

Wilson Daily Times, 9 September 1983.

Photo taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, September 2021.

923 Washington Street.

The one hundredth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; Alonzo Coley house; bungalow with unusual hip and side-gable roof configuration and shed dormer; aluminum-sided; Coley was a carpenter.”

Alonza Coley also built the houses at 914 and 918 Washington Street. Per the “Statement of Significance” section of the East Wilson nomination form: “A colleague of [O. Nestus] Freeman‘s, Alonzo Coley constructed bungalows for black clients, as well as worked in a barber shop. He advertised himself as a “licensed architect” after completing a drafting course at the local black high school.”

In 1917, Alonzo Coley registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his draft registration card, he was born 8 September 1890 in Pikeville, Wayne County; resided at 105 East Street; worked as a carpenter for Barney Reid “in the Town of Wilson;” and was single.

Alonzo Coley, 26, of Wilson, son of Christopher and Sarah E. Coley of Wayne County, married Pauline McQueen, 23, of Wilson, daughter of Anthony and Jenny McQueen of Roland, North Carolina, on 14 March 1918. Presbyterian minister H.B. Taylor performed the ceremony in the presence of Maud Battle, Laura Coley and Lula Lewis.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Washington Street, house carpenter Lonzo Coley, 29; wife Paulean, 26; daughter Elma, 6 months; sister Edith, 16; and boarder Bula Thompson, 17.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 923 Washington Street, owned and valued at $2000, building carpenter Lonie Coley, 35; wife Pauline, 34; and children Elmer, 10, Mary E., 8, Richard L., 7, Robert J., 4, and Pauline, 2.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 923 Washington Street, owned and valued at $800, carpenter Alonzo Coley, 50; wife Pauline, 46, cleaner at post office; mother Sarah, 71; and children Elma, 20, beauty parlor operator, Maratta, 18, Robert J., 14, and Pauline, 12.

Alonzo Coley died 2 November 1967 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 September 1890 to Christopher and Sarah Coley; lived at 923 Washington Street; and was a laborer. Informant was Pauline Coley.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2019.

918 Washington Street.

The ninety-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; bungalow with gable roof; engaged porch; asphalt veneer; built by carpenter Alonzo Coley.”

In the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barefoot Linwood propr Barefoot Pressing Wks h 918 Washington

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barefoot Lenwood (c; Bertha) tailor h 918 Washington

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barefoot Lenwood (c; Bertha) tailor Service Cleaning Wks h 918 Washington

William Alvis Barefoot died 22 February 1930 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 7 years old; was born in Wilson to Lenwood Barefoot and Bertha Moore, both of Wilson; lived at 918 Washington Avenue; and went to school.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 918 Washington Street, owned and valued at $6000, tailor Lenwood Barfoot, 33; wife Bertha, 32; and sons John L., 8, Stanley B., 5, Noris H., 4, Henry V., 2, and Kertise, 6 months.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Fisher Alonzo (c) porter h 918 Washington

In 1942, Alonza Garfield Fisher Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 3 May 1903 in Lenoir County, North Carolina; resided at 918 Washington, Wilson; his telephone number was 3820-1; his contact was Louis H. Fisher, Kinston, North Carolina; and he worked for the government in Railway Mail Services.

Notices of sheriff’s sale for 918 Washington appeared in the Wilson Daily Times in January and February 1946:

Wilson Daily Times, 5 February 1946.

However, when Alonza G. Fisher Sr. died 13 August 1948, he was still living at the address. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 March 1883 in Lenoir County to James Fisher and Martha Jones; was the widower of Lanie Fisher; and had worked as a laborer. Alonzo G. Fisher, Jr., 918 Washington, was informant.

Alonza Garfield Fisher Jr. died 15 September 1949 at his home at 918 Washington Street. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 May 1903 in Lenoir County, North Carolina, to Alonza G. Fisher Sr. and Mollie Carr; was married; and worked as a railway mail clerk. Lewis Henry Fisher of Kinston was informant.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.