Washington Street

923 Washington Street.

The one hundredth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; Alonzo Coley house; bungalow with unusual hip and side-gable roof configuration and shed dormer; aluminum-sided; Coley was a carpenter.”

Coley also built the houses at 914 and 918 Washington Street. Per the “Statement of Significance” section of the East Wilson nomination form: “A colleague of [O. Nestus] Freeman‘s, Alonzo Coley constructed bungalows for black clients, as well as worked in a barber shop. He advertised himself as a “licensed architect” after completing a drafting course at the local black high school.”

In 1917, Alonzo Coley registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his draft registration card, he was born 8 September 1890 in Pikeville, Wayne County; resided at 105 East Street; worked as a carpenter for Barney Reid “in the Town of Wilson;” and was single.

Alonzo Coley, 26, of Wilson, son of Christopher and Sarah E. Coley of Wayne County, married Pauline McQueen, 23, of Wilson, daughter of Anthony and Jenny McQueen of Roland, North Carolina, on 14 March 1918. Presbyterian minister H.B. Taylor performed the ceremony in the presence of Maud Battle, Laura Coley and Lula Lewis.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Washington Street, house carpenter Lonzo Coley, 29; wife Paulean, 26; daughter Elma, 6 months; sister Edith, 16; and boarder Bula Thompson, 17.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 923 Washington Street, owned and valued at $2000, building carpenter Lonie Coley, 35; wife Pauline, 34; and children Elmer, 10, Mary E., 8, Richard L., 7, Robert J., 4, and Pauline, 2.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 923 Washington Street, owned and valued at $800, carpenter Alonzo Coley, 50; wife Pauline, 46, cleaner at post office; mother Sarah, 71; and children Elma, 20, beauty parlor operator, Maratta, 18, Robert J., 14, and Pauline, 12.

Alonzo Coley died 2 November 1967 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 September 1890 to Christopher and Sarah Coley; lived at 923 Washington Street; and was a laborer. Informant was Pauline Coley.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2019.

914 Washington Street.

The ninety-third in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “circa 1930; 1 1/2 story; bungalow with clipped-gable roof and dormer; built by carpenter Alonzo Coley.”

It’s likely that this well-kept bungalow was built some years prior to 1930, as the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory shows: Jeffries David (c; Ethel) gro 912 1/2 Washington h do [ditto]

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 914 Washington, valued at $2000, grocery store proprietor David Jeffreys, 58; wife Ethel, 57, cook; and lodger Kattie Brown, 24, cook.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 914 Washington, valued at $3000, retail grocery owner David Jeffreys, 67, born in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, and wife Ethel, 64, born in Cumberland County, N.C.

David O. Jeffreys died 22 October 1949 at his home at 914 Washington Street. Per his death certificate, he was married to Ethel Jeffreys; was born 8 November 1879 in Chase City, Virginia; and had worked as a cement finisher.

Ethel Jeffreys died 7 December 1958 at her home at 914 Washington. Per her death certificate, she was born 22 August 1876 in Cumberland County, N.C., to John Bell and Pearcey Williams; was a widow. Informant was Clyde McLean of the home.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

 

1007 Washington Street.

The thirty-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; gambrel-front house with two-bay facade and gabled porch; built by William Hines for tenants.”

In the 1930 Wilson, N.C., city directory: Fitts E Courtney (c), tchr Stantonsburg St Graded School h 1007 Washington; Fitts Howard M (c) (E Courtney) commander American Legion, Henry Ellis Post, h 1007 Washington

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1007 Washington Street, dry cleaner Oscar Reid, 41; wife Nora, 39, laundress; and children James O., 20, Cecil, 18, Percell, 16, Leotis, 14, Margarett, 7, Evangeline, 4, Eugene, 3, and Lettie Romaine, 2 months.

In the 1941 Wilson, N.C., city directory: Reid J Oscar (c; Nora; 5) clnr Service Laundry & Dry Clnrs h 1007 Washington.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, July 2017.

1207 Washington Street.

The thirty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; George Riggin house; bungalow with clipped-gable roof and entry porch; aluminum sided; Riggin was a house painter.”

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: painter George Riggins, 49; wife Eloise, 45, tobacco factory stemmer; and sons George, 18, and Robert, 20, both painters helpers. All were born in South Carolina.

In the 1941 and 1946 Hill’s city directories of Wilson: Riggins Geo (c; Eleise) pntr h1207 Washington, as well as Riggins Geo Jr pntr h1207 Washington.

Photograph taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, September 2017.