teacher

Teachers at Sam Vick.

vick 49-50

Teachers at Samuel H. Vick Elementary School, 1949-50.

Front row

Back row

  • John Maxwell Miller Jr. — J.M. Miller (1910-1995), a native of Chesterfield, South Caroline, was principal of Sam Vick Elementary from 1944 to 1968.
  • Irene Wallace
  • Carrie Herndon — Carrie Lee Herndon (1915-1986) was probably a Nash County native.
  • Classie Jones Jarman — Classie Jones Jarman (1925-1993) was a native of Tarboro, North Carolina.
  • Ann Bostic — Annie Watson Bostic (1915-1959), a native of Johnston County, apparently lived in Wilson only briefly.
  • Etta Givens — Etta Daisy Wynn Givens (1921-2002) was a native of Mount Olive, Wayne County.
  • Hattie Dixon Nemo
  • Alvis Hines — Alvis Ashley Hines (1918-1981) was the son of Ashley and Mattie Barnes Hines. (His mother was a daughter of Ned and Louisa Gay Barnes.)

This photograph, contributed by Jennie P. Kerbo, is reprinted from 23 February 1999 edition of the Wilson Daily Times.

Teacher training at A&T.

From the roster of teachers receiving training listed in  he 1922-23 Annual Catalog of the Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina —

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  • Lurean Barnes  Lurean Barnes Zachary died 30 April 1963 at Mercy Hospital in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 28 February 1899 in Wilson to Sam Barnes and Ida Hinton; was married to Joe K. Zachary; and worked as a teacher.
  • Mary E. Isler — Mary Isler was the stepdaughter of Owen L.W. Smith. In the 1900 census of Swift Creek township, Pitt County, North Carolina, she is listed as a one month-old in the household of her parents Turney and Cynthia Isler. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County, minister Owen W. Smith, 58, wife Lucy A., 45, son Jessy A. Smith, 27, daughter Carry E. Smith, 10, and step-children John H. Isler, 12, and Mary A. Isler, 10. In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 129 Pender Street, Owen L. Smith, 68; wife Cynthia, 55; stepchild Mary E. Isler, 20, a teacher; roomer John H. Isler, 21; Claud L. Burgen, 29, wife Annie L., 24, and son Claud L., Jr., 1; and five roomers, all tobacco factory workers, John Davis, 33, Major Lewis, 25, Edgar Jones, 25, Walter Walker, 25, and Paul Barnes, 21. On 2 June 1922, Mary E. Isler, 22, foster daughter of O.L.W. and Anna A. Smith, married Clarence L. King, 24, of Wayne County, son of James and Sarah King, in Wilson. A.M.E. Zion minister B.P. Coward performed the ceremony in the presence of J.D. Reid, C.S. Thomas, and W.T. Darden. By 1940, the Kings were living in the Bronx with daughter Grace, born about 1923. Mary E. King died in New York in April 1981.
  • Fannie F. Ricks — in the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: railroad track laborer Samuel Ford, 25, wife Mattie, 21, and daughter Fannie, 1. In the 1910 census of Elm City, Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Wilson Street, railroad foreman Samuel T. Ford, 34; wife Mattie, 30; and children Fannie, 11, Maurice, 9, Willie, 4, and Thomas, 1. On 27 July 1919, Fannie Fort, 21, of Toisnot township, married Wiley Ricks, 21, of Toisnot township. Presbyterian minister A.E. Sephas performed the ceremony in the presence of John Gaston, Saml. T. Ford, and T.H. Nicholson. Fannie Ford Ricks died 9 March 1924 in Elm City, Toisnot township, WIlson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 11 January 1899 in Wilson County to Sam Ford of Halifax County and Mattie Williams of Wilson County. She was married to Wiley Ricks.

What happened when white perverts threatened to slap colored school teachers.

4 2 1921

New York Age, 2 April 1921.

In local lore, this incident has been conflated with the Charles Coon slapping incident of 1918. The teachers “Burns” and “Izell” were probably Georgia M. Burke and Mary C. Euell. Euell had been at the center of the Coon matter. Capable, courageous Mr. Bowser, “very much of a man,” was likely Burt L. Bowser, who owned a small restaurant. The Gay Brothers, Charles and Allen T., operated a dry goods store at 216-220 East Nash Street.

913 East Green Street.

The fourteenth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; Darcey Yancey House; bungalow with engaged porch; Yancey was a druggist.”

In the 1908 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, Dr. Darcey C. Yancy, proprietor of Ideal Pharmacy, was listed as a boarder at Union Hotel.

Darcey C. Yancey, 28, of Danville, Virginia, son of W.A. and F.S. Yancey, married Lelia Beatrice Ireland, 25, of Guilford County, North Carolina, on 14 September 1910 in Sedalia, North Carolina. One of the witnesses to the ceremony was Charlotte E. Hawkins, later Charlotte Hawkins Brown, who founded what would become Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia in 1902. Lelia Ireland, a graduate of Scotia Seminary, was the first teacher Hawkins Brown hired.

8 24 1917

Wilson Times, 24 August 1917.

Darcy Cecil Yancey registered for the World War I draft in Wilson on 12 September 1918. Per his registration card, he was born 10 February 1883; resided at 547 East Nash Street; worked for himself as a druggist at 546 East Nash; and his nearest relative was Lelia B. Yancey.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: residing at 547 Nash Street, Darcy C. Yancey, 37, manager at drug store, and wife Lelia B., 32.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 538 East Nash Street, druggist Darcy C. Yancey, 46, wife Lelia B., 40, and daughter Maude, 9.

Also in 1930 census of Wilson, the enumerator found four young single women at 913 East Green Street: Minnesota-born Ruth A. Brown, 23, North Carolina-born Annie Wilson, 25, and Lucile Wynn, 22, and Washington, D.C.-born Bessie Davis, 28, all teachers, paying a total of $25/month in rent. The house, in effect, was a teacherage for Wilson Colored High School, which sat right across Carroll Street.

Intersection of Green and Carroll, Sanborn insurance map, 1930.

At some point in the 1930s, the Yanceys purchased 913 East Green and left their rented digs on Nash Street across from the pharmacy. The 1941 Hill’s city directory lists Darcey C. and Lelia B. Yancey’s residence as 913 East Green, and Yancey’s Drug Store at 563 East Nash.

D’arcey Yancey died 12 April 1957 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 14 February 18983 in Danville, Virginia, to William Alexander Yancey and Florence E. Stewart; resided at 913 East Green Street; and worked as a druggist. Wife Lelia B. Yancey was informant.

Lelia Beatrice Yancey died 4 June 1983 in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Per her death certificate, she was born 14 May 1889 to unknown parents; was the widow of D’arsey C. Yancey; and was a retired superintendent of elementary schools. She was buried with her husband at Rest Haven cemetery in Wilson.

Photograph taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2017.

D.C. brides.

Indianapolis Recorder 5 18 1935

Indianapolis Recorder, 18 May 1935.

The Recorder reported on the marriages of five women with ties to Washington, D.C., including J.D. and Eleanor Frederick Reid‘s daughter Thelma, who married Matthew J. Whitehead of Rocky Mount. Thelma Reid taught at Cardozo night high school.

Mary Howard Gaston McPhail.

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In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on the Elm City and Wilson Road, farmer Junius Rosser, 59, wife Lizzie, 46, children Daniel, 14, Annie, 12, Bennie, 10, and Lizzie, 8, and boarder Mary Howard, 19, a teacher.

On 8 March 1923, Dewey Gaston, 23, son of George and Priscilla Gaston, all of Wilson County, married Mary B. Howard, 24, of Edgecombe County, daughter of Mary E. Darden. Dewey’s brother Mancie Gaston applied for the license, and Rev. R.E. Sentelle performed the ceremony in Edgecombe County in the presence of Mancie Gaston and Fannie F. Ricks of Elm City.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: barber Dewey Gaston, 30, wife Mary, 20 [sic], and children Doris L., 5, and Victor H., 3.

In the 1940 census of the Town of Elm City, Wilson County: on Dixon Street, barber Dewey Gaston, 40, wife Mary, 38, a teacher, and children Dorris, 15, and Victor H., 13.

Dewey Milton Gaston died 14 February 1946 in Elm City. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 November 1899 in Elm City to George Gaston and Priscilla (no maiden name listed); worked as a self-employed barber; was married to Mary Gaston; and was buried in Elm City cemetery. Mary Gaston was informant.

On 21 January 1951, Mary B. Gaston, 47, of Elm City, daughter of Victor and Mamie Howard, married Hector H. McPhail, 48, of Wilson, son of R.J. and Laura Waddell McPhail. A.M.E. Zion minister Allen J. Kirk performed the ceremony in Elm City. Mrs. C.L. Darden, Dr. J.B. Rosemond, and Mrs. Grace Artis were witnesses.

Mary Howard Gaston McPhail died 7 July 1985 in Wilson.

Photograph courtesy of Maria Rosemond Logan — many thanks.

Roll of honor.

The single surviving edition of the Wilson Blade, an African-American newspaper, reported this “Roll of honor of the colored graded school for the month ending Nov. 13th, 1897.”

w-blade-11-20-1897-honor-roll

Wilson Blade, 20 November 1897.

  • Annie Thomas
  • Edie Corey
  • Mary Darden
  • Carneva Blount — daughter of Marcus and Annie Bryant Smith Blount. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: widower Mark Blount, 38, a cook, and his children Coneva, 10, Dotsey, 9, and Theodore W., 6, were lodgers in the household of George Faggin.
  • Naomi Blount
  • Mamie Towe
  • Maggie Simmons
  • Loretta Best — in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: carpenter Crocket Best, 64; wife Carline, 62; daughter Mary, 23; and granddaughters Elizabeth, 2, and Loretta, 8.
  • Annie Peacock — in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: widowed cook Rosetta Peacock, 47, and children Lillie, 18, Carrie, 12, Charlie, 12, Annie, 7, and granddaughters Addie, 6, and Julia M., 5 months.
  • Bernice Farmer — daughter of Gray and Argent Blount Farmer. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: nurse Argent R. Farmer, 46, and daughters Clara, 23, a seamstress, Rosa, 15, Roberta, 14, Gladys, 11, Bernice, 10, and Katie, 8.
  • Vasti Taylor
  • Earnest Freeman — son of Julius and Eliza Daniels Freeman. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: 56 year-old carpenter Julius Freeman, wife Eliza, 46, and children Elizabeth, 19, Nestus, 17, Junius, 11, Ernest, 9, Tom, 6, Daniel, 4, and Ruth, 4 months.
  • George Gaston — son of John A. and Sattena Barnes Gaston. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber John Gaston, 44, wife Satina, 30, and children Theodore, 13, Cicero, 10, George, 8, and Caroline, 2 months.
  • Sylvester Purrington — in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: cook James Purrington, 35; wife Edmonia, 30; and children Sylvester, 8, Hester, 2, and Viola, 1. Sylvester Purrington registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 22 July 1895 in Wilson County; resided at 809 Roberson Street, Wilson; and worked as a laborer for a furniture company.
  • S.M. Barbour — Sallie M. Barbour.
  • Cicero Gaston — son of John A. and Sattena Barnes Gaston.
  • Willie Clark — son of Rhoden and Sarah Clark. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: mechanic Roden Clark, 60; wife Sarrah, 50; and children Mittie, 30, Catherine, 19, Alethia, 17, Walter, 16, Bettie, 15, Cary, 13, and Willie, 11.
  • Hattie Davis
  • Ernest Moore — son of Lee A. and Louisa Moore. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: merchant Lee Moore, 36, wife Louisa, 32, and son Ernest, 12.
  • Viola Barnes — daughter of Dave and Pattie Battle Barnes. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: hotel porter Dave Barnes, 40; wife Della; and children Walter, 20, William, 15, Lucy, 13, Dave, 5, and Viola, 11. [Walter and William were in fact Walter and William Hines, Della Hines Barnes’ sons and Dave’s stepsons.]
  • Gladis Farmer — daughter of Gray and Argent Blount Farmer.
  • Allie Barnes
  • Mary Battle — daughter of Allen and Annie Battle. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer Allen Battle, 50; wife Annie, 39; and children Mallon,22, Anner, 16, Mariah, 13, Mary, 11, Edward, 8, James, 6, George, 4, and Maggie, 1.
  • Nannie Taylor — in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: laundry woman Sonora Taylor, 34, and children Nannie, 13, Isah, 10, and Smith, 6.
  • Virginia Dawson — daughter of Alexander D. and Lucy Hill Dawson.
  • Lucy Holland — Lucy Holland, 21, married Frank Battle, 21, in Wilson on 26 April 1911. Rev. Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony in the presence of Henry H. Blow, Ada Knight and Joe Baker.
  • Lillie Boykin — daughter of John and Dicy Boykin. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: house mover John Boykin, 30; wife Dicy, 44, a cook; and children Sallie, 19, cook, James, 18, Dotia, 16, Susia, 13, Lillie, 10, and Eliza, 7.
  • Annie Purrington
  • Granville Towe — son of Granville H. and Maggie Corprew Towe. 
  • Geneva Simms — on 27 November 1907, Jos. Daniel, 22, married Jeneva Simms, 20, in Wilson.
  • Ida B. Rountree
  • Annie Best
  • Bessie Simms — on 31 October 1905, Clarence McCullers, 21, son of Jerry McCullers, married Bessie Simms, 19, daughter of Lee and Mary Simms, in Wilson.  A.M.E. Zion minister N.D. King performed the ceremony in the presence of Rosa Rountree, Barton Griffin and Will Bullock.
  • Mary L. Barnes
  • George Winstead — son of Braswell R. and Ada Winstead. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: assistant postmaster Braswell Winstead, 39, wife Ada, 25, and children Arnold, 13, George, 12, Rolland, 11, and Christine, 8.
  • Ambrose Towe — son of Granville H. and Maggie Corprew Towe.
  • Susie Boykin — daughter of John and Dicy Boykin. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: house mover John Boykin, 30; wife Dicy, 44, a cook; and children Sallie, 19, cook, James, 18, Dotia, 16, Susia, 13, Lillie, 10, and Eliza, 7.
  • Arthur Darden — son of Charles H. and Diana Scarborough Darden. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: wheelwright Charles Darden, 44, wife Dianna, 40, and children Annie, 21, Comilous, 15, Lizzie, 13, Arthor, 12, Artelia, 10, Russell, 5, and Walter, 4.
  • Ometa Purrington 
  • Mattie Battle
  • Armena Barnes — daughter of Short W. and Frances Barnes. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: day laborer Short W., 38, wife Frances, 40, and daughters Armena, 13, and Mary M., 6, plus cousin Eliza, 19. Armena V. Barnes died 10 July 1907 and is buried in the Masonic cemetery.
  • Rowlland Winstead — son of Braswell R. and Ada Winstead. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: assistant postmaster Braswell Winstead, 39, wife Ada, 25, and children Arnold, 13, George, 12, Rolland, 11, and Christine, 8. Rolland Tyson Winstead registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 16 June 1889 in Wilson; resided at 603 Green Street, Wilson; and worked as a barber for John Bradsher, Rocky Mount, North Carolina.
  • Clarence Crawford — son of Daniel A. and Annie D. Crawford. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Daniel A. Crawford, 44, A.P. Co. employee; wife Annie D., 34; and children James L., 13, Clarence A., 9, William C., 8, Mable L., 6, Mena, 4, Julius L., 3, and Ulyses G., 1. Clarence Allen Crawford registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 23 September 1891 in Durham, North Carolina; resided at 617 Green Street, Wilson; and worked as a bricklayer for Wilkins Brothers, Wilson.
  • Theodore Gaston — son of John A. and Sattena Barnes Gaston.
  • G.H. Towe — Granville Harrison Towe.
  • Glace Battle — daughter of Parker and Ella Lea Burston Battle. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: moulder Parker Battle, 45, wife Ella L., 38, children Mamie P., 19, James A., 17, Sallie R., 14, Sudie E., 12, and John T., 9, plus mother-in-law Roberta A. Outlaw, 49.
  • Minnie Harris — the daughter of Arch and Rosa Woodard Harris. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer Arch Harris, 53; wife Rosa, 45; and children James, 22, Arch, 20, Mary Jane, 18, Nancy, 16, Lucy, 12, Minnie, 11, Maggie, 8, Jessie, 6, and Annie, 3.
  • Charlie Battle — son of Charles and Leah Hargrove Battle. In 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: blacksmith Charley Battle, 50, a widower; son Charley, 10; and Menerver Edwards, 58, a hired washwoman.
  • Arnold Winstead — son of Braswell R. and Ada Winstead. Arnold Winstead registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 31 August 1886 in Wilson; resided at 545 East Nash Street, Wilson; and worked as a bricklayer for William Glisson, Wilson.
  • Dorsey Battle — in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: tobacco stemmer Naomie Farmer, 32, and two boarders Dorsey Battle, 21, a cook, and his wife Laura, 20.
  • Mamie Battle — daughter of Parker and Ella Lea Burston Battle.
  • Hattie Best — daughter of Orren and Hancy Best. On 31 December 1902, Willie Barnes, 22, son of Willis and Cherry Barnes, married Hattie Best, 21, daughter of Orange and Hancy Best, at Orren Best’s residence in Wilson. A.M.E. Zion minister N.D. King performed the ceremony in the presence of Charles B. Gay, John H. Lewis, and Orren Best.
  • Rosa Parker — daughter of Allison and Mary Hilliard Parker. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: teamster Allison Parker, 44; wife Mary, 32; and children Thomas, 19, Rosa, 17, Etta, 15, Carter, 13, and Oscar, 5.
  • Etta Parker — daughter of Allison and Mary Hilliard Parker.
  • Carter Parker — son of Allison and Mary Hilliard Parker.
  • Ada G. Battle — daughter of Charles and Leah Hargrove Battle. In the 1900 census, Ada G. Battle, 24, is a listed as a teacher at Scotia Seminary in Concord, Cabarrus County, North Carolina.
  • Donie Battle — daughter of Charles and Leah Hargrove Battle.
  • Lena Harris — probably, in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: doctor Frank Hargrave, 32, wife Bessie, 23, and boarder Lena Harris, 26, insurance bookkeeper.
  • Henry Bynum
  • Camillus Darden — son of Charles H. and Diana Scarborough Darden. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: wheelwright Charles Darden, 44, wife Dianna, 40, and children Annie, 21, Comilous, 15, Lizzie, 13, Arthor, 12, Artelia, 10, Russell, 5, and Walter, 4.
  • Lizzie Darden — daughter of Charles H. and Diana Scarborough Darden. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: wheelwright Charles Darden, 44, wife Dianna, 40, and children Annie, 21, Comilous, 15, Lizzie, 13, Arthor, 12, Artelia, 10, Russell, 5, and Walter, 4.
  • Ida Armstrong
  • S.A. Smith — Simeon A. Smith.

A rather bad predicament.

11-26-1891

Wilson Advance, 26 November 1891.

The rather bad predicament did not keep Tower down for long, and he returned at least temporarily to Wilson. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: schoolteacher Granville Tower, 40, wife Rosa, 40, and children Ophelia, 21, Addie, 18, Stella, 15, Ambrose, 14, Granville, 12, Powhatan, 9, Marry, 7, and Sinclair, 7.