Houses

902 Faison Street.

This house is located just outside the East Wilson Historic District.

In 1918, Sankey Jones registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 25 July 1879; lived on Faison Street; worked as a laborer for Hackney Wagon; and his nearest relative was Ida Jones.

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones Sanky (c; Ida J) hlpr h 902 Faison

Ida Jones died 2 December 1928 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 2 March 1886 in Wilson County to Patrick Faison and Ella Blunt; was married to Sankey Jones; and worked as a laundress.

Sankey Jones’ house was advertised for sheriff’s sale in 1929, but it appears that he was able to redeem it.

Wilson Daily Times, 29 August 1929.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 902 Faison, owned and valued at $1000, Sanky Jones, 40, wagon factory laborer; wife Amecia, 38, cook; children James, 16, and Ray M., 13; and lodger Frank Sharp, 48, gardener.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones Sanky (c; Armesia) h 902 Faison

Sankey Jones died 6 February 1942 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 26 January 1884 in Wilson County to Henry Jones and Elizabeth Darring; was married to Armecia Jones, age 44; worked as a laborer for Hackney Wagon Company; and was buried in Rountree cemetery.

Armecia Jones died 8 September 1959 at the Green Street crossing of the A.C.L. railroad in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 10 July 1893 in Louisburg, N.C., to Mary Malone; was widowed; and resided at 902 Faison Street. Raye Frazier of Brooklyn was informant.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 September 1959.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

1012 Atlantic Street.

The eighty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; gambrel-front house with two-bay facade; aluminum-sided.”

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: George Arthur H (c; Minnie B) pastor Calvary Presbyterian Ch h 1012 Atlantic.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1012 Atlantic Street carpenter/bricklayer Arthur J. George, wife Minnie, sons Arthur, Henry H., and Bryant George, lodger Rebacer Ramsy, and niece Willie L. George.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1012 Atlantic Avenue, rented for $12/month, tobacco factory janitor Bud Bryant, 52; wife Nancy, 48; nieces Louise, 17, Nannie, 15, Mary, 12, and Carleen Reid, 11; and son Frederick Reid, 34, divorced.

In 1940, Frederick Reid registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 September 1905 in Wilson; resided at 1012 Atlantic; his contact was mother Nancy Bryant, 1012 Atlantic; and he worked for W.B. Corbett, Waterworks Road, Wilson.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bryant Bud (c; Nancy) lab 1012 Atlantic Av.

Nancy Bryant died 14 January 1945 at her home at 1012 Atlantic Street. Per her death certificate, she was 53 years old; born in Wayne County to Zion and Eliza Reid; and was married to Rev. Mathew B. Bryant, age 56, who was informant.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

Lost ‘hoods, no. 3.

As illustrated in earlier “Lost ‘Hoods” posts, downtown Wilson was once shot through with narrow alleys packed with the tiny double-shotgun dwellings of African-American tobacco workers. In addition to Banks Alley and Oil Mill Alley and Parker’s Alley (also known as Vick’s Alley) and Young’s Alley, there were:

  • Sunshine Alley

Sunshine Alley lay in the shadow of Liggett & Meyers’ tobacco warehouse and within a block of Smith’s, Planter’s Warehouse, Banner, Monk-Adams, Farmers and Watson Warehouses. As shown in the 1922 Sanborn fire insurance map of Wilson, the western end of the alley was a slot off Goldsboro Street in the block otherwise bounded by Hines, South Mercer and East Jones Streets.

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The eastern end formed a dogleg dividing the block bounded by Goldsboro, Hines, Spring and Jones Streets.

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Sunshine Alley is long gone, but its path is easily followed in the driveway of the Family Dollar store at Hines and Goldsboro, the driveway of Barrett’s Printing House (the white-roofed structure below standing with the former footprint of Smith & Leggett) and the cut-through that continues past Barrett’s to Douglas Street (formerly Spring).

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  • Walnut Alley

Only a block long, Walnut Alley ran parallel to South Spring (Douglas) and South Lodge Streets between East Walnut and East Banks Streets. The 1922 Sanborn fire insurance map depicts a small “colored church” on Spring.

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That church is now Saint Rose Church of Christ, and the alley is Walnut Lane.

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Current maps courtesy of Google Maps.

504 South Lodge Street.

This house is not within the bounds of East Wilson Historic District. However, South Lodge Street — below the warehouse district — has been an African-American residential area since the turn of the twentieth century.

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In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 506 [sic] Lodge Street, cafe proprietor Jessie Strickland, 28, and wife Viola, 27, and roomers Mack Strickland, 18, transfer truck driver, and James Johnson, 20, guano company laborer.

In the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Strickland Jesse (c; Viola) propr Strickland Cafe h 504 S Lodge

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 504 Lodge Street, owned and valued at $4000, Jesse Strickland, 46, and wife Viola, 37. Their occupations are listed as farm laborer and “manufacturing [illegible]/own plant.” However, it appears that entries are off by a line, and should read “manufacturing [illegible]/own plant” and cook for private family.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Strickland Jesse (c; Viola) 504 S Lodge

In a familiar tale of woe, the Stricklands defaulted on their mortgage, and Wilson Home & Loan Association advertised the property for auction.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 November 1930.

Jessie Strickland died 18 March 1932 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 40 years old; was born in Wilson to Mose Farmer and Hannah Strickland; was a clerk in a store; and lived at Spring Street. Informant was Viola Strickland, 504 South Lodge.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Mable Annie (c) maid h 504 S Lodge

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Mable Annie (c) h 504 S Lodge

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2017.

413 East Green Street.

The seventy-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1893; 1 story; Zachariah Barnes house; two-room house; aluminum-sided; Barnes was a porter.” The house was formerly numbered #414.

In the 1912 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Zachariah porter 414 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: office maid Mary Palmer, 50, and her children Beatrice, 23, private cook; James E., 18, drugstore delivery boy; Glayds, 14, private nurse; Mary L., 12, private nurse; Lonie, 9; and Robert L., 8.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Palmer Mary (c) janitress h 413 E Green; Palmer Beatrice (c) domestic 413 E Green; and Palmer Edw (c) porter Turlington & Morrison h 413 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 413 East Green, rented at $15/month, Georgia-born household servant Isaac Butler, 44; wife Estelle, a household servant; and lodger Eleanor Deans, 38, also a household servant.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Russell Julia (c) cook h 413 E Green

In the 1947-48 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Lee John W (c; Irene) orderly Woodard-Herring Hosp h 413 E Green

On 16 September 1986, the Wilson Daily Times ran an obituary for Lula B. Collins, who had last lived at 413 East Green:

612 South Lodge Street.

This duplex is not within the bounds of East Wilson Historic District. However, South Lodge Street — below the warehouse district — has been an African-American residential area since the turn of the twentieth century.

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In the 1925 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Williams Luvie (c) lab 612 S Lodge

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Case Benton (c; Beatrice) lab h 612 S Lodge

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: at 612 South Lodge, rented for $20/month, street sweeper Bynum Case, 38, and wife Beatrice, 35, laundress.

In 1931, realtor D.S. Boykin advertised the sale of 612 South Lodge, with its “one, four-room dwelling” on a 55′ x 100′ lot, pursuant to Louvie Williams’ default on a mortgage he obtained just two years earlier (before the collapse of the American economy that signaled the Great Depression.)

Wilson Daily Times, 4 March 1931.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 612 Lodge, two families renting at $8/month each, lumber mill laborer James Simpson, 33, wife Frances, 32, and son James Lewis, 11, and building construction laborer Henry Romey McQuen, 39, wife Pearlina, 31, and daughter Lee Winstead McQuen, 10. The McQueens were born in South Carolina.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: McQueen Henry R (c; Pearline L; 1) tob wkr h 612 S Lodge

In 1942, Henry Rommie McQueen registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones Leona (c) tob wkr h 612 S Lodge and Dawson Eliz (c) tob h 612 S Lodge

Eighteen years later, the address was home to Joseph Hall, who died 3 May 1965.

Wilson Daily Times, 7 May 1965.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2018.

812 Viola Street.

The seventy-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1922; 1 1/2 stories; gambrel-roofed house; double-pile; turned porch posts; locally rare.”

Robert C. Bainbridge and Kate Ohno’s Wilson, North Carolina: Historic Buildings Survey (1980) provides additional details about the house, including the photo above. “This house, probably built in the early twentieth century, has an extremely unusual gambrel roof. Two peaked louvers ornament the gable end and a shed roof porch with turned columns shelters the front facade.” This house has been demolished.

From the mid-1920s to the late 1940s, this house was owned by Nancy Staton Boykin and her husband James Boykin.

Erasure.

Wrote Robert C. Bainbridge and Kate Ohno in Wilson, North Carolina: Historic Buildings Survey (1980):

“Residence Park was Wilson’s first subdivision. This land, formerly used as farmland, on the western edge of Wilson was purchased by a group of developers from Norfolk, Virginia. The first lot was sold to Selby Hurt Anderson in 1906. The architectural fabric of the area is predominately representative of the Bungalow style, although many houses were built in the Colonial Revival style as well. This area flourished in the 1910’s and 1920’s but few houses date after 1930. Residence Park is the most cohesive residential neighborhood in town.”

Farmland? No doubt there were farms in the area. However, Residence Park’s development and expansion came at the immediate expense of the black community of Grabneck, which, anchored by the Best family, had taken root along a stretch of West Nash Street in the late 1800s. By the mid-1920s, all traces of the Bests and their neighbors had disappeared under Residence Park’s lovely bungalows, and within a few decades few remembered that black people had ever lived on that side of town.  Here, encapsulated, is the raison d’etre of Black Wide-Awake — to combat the erasure of African-American people and spaces of historic Wilson.

Detail of Bainbridge and Ohno’s map of Residence Park, which lies atop the old Grabneck neighborhood. #322, the H.W. Abbitt home, was built on land purchased from Wilson and Ada Best.

For more about Grabneck, see here and here and here and here.

106 South Carroll Street.

The seventy-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “1951; 1 1/2 stories; concrete-block dwelling with Tudor Revival influence.” It was classified as a non-contributing structure.

This house replaced the house Frank and Annie Green Barnes lived in from about World War I through the 1940s.

106 South Carroll sits on the west side of a double lot, shown below as lots 8 and 9 in the original plat of the neighborhood.

Map courtesy of Google Maps; Plat Book 78, pages 34-35, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson County Courthouse, Wilson.

 

 

Destroyed by fire.

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Wilson Daily Times, 1 April 1931.

In the 1910 census of Lumber Bridge township, Robeson County, North Carolina: Walter Bullard, 39; wife Emma, 38; and children Siilva J., 17, Mollie, 15, John F., 17, Earnest, 11, Wesley, 8, Walter S., 5, and Sudie B., 2.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Saratoga Road, farmer Walter Bullard, 50; wife Emmy, 42; and children Walter S., 15, Sudie Belle, 10, Olivia, 7, Sarah, 5, and Alice, 4.

On 26 October 1926, Walter Bullard, 21, son of Walter Emma Bullard, married Lucille Powell, 22, daughter of Jno. and Mariah Powell, in Wilson. John P. Battle applied for the license. E.H. Cox, a minister of the U.A. F. Will Baptist Church, performed the ceremony in the presence of Cora Hinnant, Joe Anna Hinnant and Mary Burnett.

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bullard Walter B (c; Lucille) lab h 109 N Carroll

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bullard Walter B (c; Lucille) taxi driver h 105 N Carroll

Walter Bullard died 12 July 1946 in the Wilson County Sanitorium. Per his death certificate, he was 41 years old; was born in Robeson County, North Carolina, to Walter Bullard and Amy Clark; was married to Ester Bullard; worked as a bell boy and taxi driver; and lived at 1008 Carolina Street. He was buried at Rountree’s cemetery. Informant was Emma Bullard.