migration to Indiana

Loafers are not wanted here.

JOSEPH ELLIS.

I am from Wilson, N.C.; I have been here three weeks. I found employment readily, and a good home. I live and work with Mr. F.B. Gardner, a good farmer in Russell township, Putnam county. He pays me $13 per month until spring, and then he will give me more. I find him a very kind and good man to me in the way of accommodations. Mr. Gardner could not get possession of his own house for me until the first of March, but he procured from his brother-in-law, Mr. D. Evans, a good and comfortable house for us until he can get the use of his. I am well pleased with my situation, and like this country finely. I would not go back to North Carolina for any consideration, and I would advise all my friends in that State to come to this county, as they can better their condition. But they should not come unless they expect to do good work, as loafers are not wanted here.

——

In the 1880 census of Russell township, Putnam County, Indiana: laborer Joseph Ellis, 27, and wife Prissa, 23, both born in North Carolina.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: widowed day laborer Joseph Ellis, 48; son Theodore, 16, and daughters Margaret, 10, and Vera, 8.

Senate Report 693, Part 2, 2nd Session, 46th Congress.  Proceedings of the Select Committee of the United States Senate to Investigate the Causes of the Removal of the Negroes from the Southern States to the Northern States (1880).  U.S. Congressional Serial Set.

As different as chalk and cheese.

WILLIAM CROOM.

The man is working for Daniel Evans, near Russellville, Putnam County. He has a nice brick house to live in, has a nice garden spot, fire-wood, and a team to haul it, a milch-cow and food to feed her, and $15 in cash each month; in all, equivalent to about $24 a month. He is delighted with Indiana, and urges that all his people come to our State as soon as they can get there. In an interview with me, he said: “Neither you nor any other Republican in Greencastle ever said a word to me about voting, nor asked me how I was gaining to vote; nor have I known of your asking any of our people how they were going to vote. All that has been said to us was about finding us homes and work, and taking care of us. They have done all for us they could, and our people are grateful to them for it. None of us want to go back to North Carolina; neither does any man who is honest and has sound judgment. I would take my oath on that. Most of our people who have come here are religious. I belong to the Missionary Baptist church, and am a licensed preacher. I came here to better the condition of myself and family, and to raise them respectably. I have found it better than I expected. Indeed, I don’t think that I hardly deserve as good treatment as I have received and am still receiving. From my own experience, I know that my people in North Carolina could greatly better their condition by coming here, and if they knew the facts they would come.

In a subsequent interview Croom said:

“I came from Wilson County, North Carolina. Have been here several weeks. I came because I had heard that colored men could do better here than in North Carolina, and I find that it was a true statement. There is as much difference between there and here as there is between chalk and cheese. It is altogether different. Here we are men just like the whites, get good wages, have good homes, and there are good schools for our children. The climate is no worse for us here than there. I have not yet seen as cold weather in Indiana as I have seen in North Carolina. And then the people are so different. They are just as kind to us as they can be. It seems as though they can’t do enough for us.”

——

Possibly: William Croom died 17 July 1910 in Indianapolis, Center township, Marion County, Indiana. Per his death certificate, he was 57 years old; was born in North Carolina to Sam Croom and Cherry Latta; was married to Diana Croom; and was a farmer. He was buried in Mount Jackson cemetery.

Cora Allen died 9 November 1925 at Provident Sanitarium in Indianapolis, Center township, Marion County, Indiana. Per her death certificate, she was born 15 May 1884 in Indiana to William Croom and Diana Ellis, both of North Carolina and was married to James Allen. She was buried in Floral Park cemetery.

Senate Report 693, Part 2, 2nd Session, 46th Congress.  Proceedings of the Select Committee of the United States Senate to Investigate the Causes of the Removal of the Negroes from the Southern States to the Northern States (1880).  U.S. Congressional Serial Set.

This is the cause of the exodus.

THOMAS BYNUM.

I lived in Wilson County, North Carolina. I have a wife and eight children. It cost me one hundred and twenty-three dollars to get here. I never heard any thing about politics until I got to Indianapolis; then I was asked by a Democrat if some Republican did not go South and make fine promises to me, and did they not bring me here to vote? I told him, no, that I brought myself; I came on my own money; and that I came because I could not get any pay for my work, nor could I educate my children there; and now that I have seen the difference between the North and South I would not go back to North Carolina for anything, and I never expect to go back in life nor after death, except the buzzards carry me back. Mr. Turnbull, of Toisenot, N.C., a white Democrat, told me that I was coming out here to perish, but so far from perishing I am faring better than I ever fared before in my life. I wish to say that cases like the following is what brought about the exodus: A colored man rented a farm, for which he was to pay three bales of cotton, weighing 450 pounds each; he raised on that farm eleven bales of cotton, weighing 450 pounds each, and 25 barrels of corn, which left to the tenant eight bales of cotton, and 25 barrels of corn, pease, &c. The tenant bought nothing but a very small amount of very coarse food and clothing, using all the economy during the crop season to make no large account, thinking thereby to have something coming to him at settling day; but when settling day came the landlord had so enlarged his account as to cover everything — the eight bales of cotton, the 25 barrels of corn, pease, and all, and then said that the tenant lacked a little of paying out, although cotton sold at ten cents per pound. This and numerous other things is the cause of the exodus.

——

Probably, in the 1870 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farm laborer Thomas Bynum, 32; wife Bethana, 28; and children James, 11, Oliver, 8, Mary, 6, Lavinia, 4, and “no name,” 2; and Lucy Pitt, 53. “Ages of this family are in doubt.”

In the 1880 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: merchant P.J. Turnbull, 29, and family.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Howard County, Indiana: at 1622 Guffin Street, street laborer Albert Whitley, 36; Polly, 32; children Cicero, 13, Mamie, 12, Albert, 9, Leonard, 6, and Wilber, 3; and grandfather Thomas Bynum, 65. All the adults were born in North Carolina.

Senate Report 693, Part 2, 2nd Session, 46th Congress.  Proceedings of the Select Committee of the United States Senate to Investigate the Causes of the Removal of the Negroes from the Southern States to the Northern States (1880).  U.S. Congressional Serial Set.

Wilbert T. Moore.

Research on the will of Esther McGowan lead to the discovery of the migration of her daughter Alice McGowan Moore to Indianapolis in the first decade of the twentieth century. Alice’s Wilson-born children Charles, Hester and Wilbert settled in Indiana with her. After I published the McGowan post, I was contacted by a descendant of the family. Today, Damon Moore shared with me photographs of Alice M. Moore’s youngest son Wilbert. Many thanks, Damon!

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Wilbert T. Moore (1896-1963).

The last will and testament of Nathan Blackwell. 

Nathan Blackwell, born in Wilson County circa 1840, drafted his last will and testament in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1907.

Nathan left five dollars to son Nathan Blackwell Jr. He directed that his daughter-in-law Hattie Blackwell receive his household goods and furniture provided that she care and keep house for him. Granddaughter Martha Blackwell, daughter of his deceased son Edwin Blackwell, was to receive the remainder of his estate (or, if she died, it went to her brother Peter Blackwell.) Edwin’s son John Blackwell received a double-barreled shotgun.

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Nathan Blackwell died 2 December 1908.

Indiana Wills and Probate Records, 1798-1999 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Where did they go?: Indiana death certificates, no. 3.

Death certificates of Wilson County natives who died in Indiana.

  • Jack Sims

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In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg, Wilson County: Isaac Simms, 32, wife Elvy, 33, and children Lucy, 12, Lilly, 10, Jack, 6, Isaac, 5, and unnamed 10 day-old twins, a boy and a girl.

In the 1940 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: North Carolina-born Jack Sims, 69, was a lodger in a household on 17th Street.

  • Ella Farmer Suggs

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In the 1940 census of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Indiana: hotel night porter Adock Thompson, 68, wife Hattie, 55, and widowed sister-in-law Ella Suggs, 68. Ella indicated that she had been living in Indianapolis in 1935.

  • Joseph Levi Sutton

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In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Wiggins Street, Joseph Sutton, 31, wife Maryliza, 30, and children Lula M., 9, Collie L., 6, Amanda, 4, and Bessie E., 1.

In the 1920 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: on Finch Mill Road, Joseph B. Sutton, 40, wife Malissa, 40, and children Lula May, 19, Carrol Lee, 16, Senoa, 13, Bessie, 11, Rosa Belle, 9, Beatrice, 7, James W., 5, Frederick C., 2, and Levi J., 10 months.

In the 1930 census of Pottstown, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania: at 329 Front Street, Joseph B. Sutton, 50, wife Malissa G., 53, and children Beatrice, 17, James W., 15, Frederick, 13, Joseph L., 11, Bruce, 9, Beulah, 9, and Mable E., 7.

On 22 May 1940, in Emporia, Greensville County, Virginia, Joseph L. Sutton, 21, of Petersburg, Virginia, married Josie Mae Kenney, 18, of Wilson, North Carolina. Joseph, son of Joseph B. Sutton and Melissa G. Thaggard, reported that he was born in Sussex County, Virginia. Josie, daughter of Frank Kenney and Ida Barnes, reported that she was born in Baltimore, Maryland.

On 16 October 1940, Joseph Levi Sutton registered for the World War II draft. His registration card notes that he was born 19 May 1919 in Wilson County, that he resided at 534 East Nash Street in Wilson, that he worked for Southern Tobacco Company, and that his nearest relative was Malissie Gray Sutton of 716 East Green Street.

Malissie Gray Sutton died 17 May 1964 at her daughter’s home at 1200 Carolina Street in Wilson. Her death certificate states that she was born 15 May 1880 in Cumberland County to Andrew Thaggard and Annie Edwards. Informant was Lula Hayes of 1200 Carolina.

  • Eliza Patterson Venable

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In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 27 West 10th Street, widow Eliza Venable, 53, laundress, and daughter Fannie Patterson, 30, domestic.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 913 Camp Street, Edward Thompkins, 47, wife Fannie, 36, daughter Elizabeth, 4, and widowed mother-in-law Eliza Venable, 63.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2846 Shriver Street, Edward Tompkins, 56, wife Fannie, 44, daughter Elizabeth, 15, and mother-in-law Eliza Venable, 73. Edward worked as a stock clerk in an electric shop and Fannie as a church secretary.

  • Eleanor Bynum Whitlock

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  • Eugene Williams

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In 1942, Eugene Williams of 918 Fayette Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, registered for the World War II draft. His draft card reports that he was born 9 May 1878 in Wilson County, North Carolina, that his contact was Jannie Williams, and that he worked for Heteren & Burner & Co.

  • John A. Woodard

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In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1146 West 26th Street, North Carolina-born laborer John Woodard, 46, and Ohio-born wife Belle, 44.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1146 West 27th Street, owned and valued at $2500, John Woodard, 56,  wife Belle, 54, and son Frederick, 7. John worked as a janitor in a business building.

In the 1940 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 104 Geisendorf Street, laborer John Woodard, 66, and wife Belle, 65.

Where did they go?: Indiana death certificates, no. 1.

Death certificates of Wilson County natives who died in Indiana.

  • Delphia Simpson Blackwell

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Delpha Blackwell died 2 April 1902 in Indianapolis of apoplexy. Her death certificate states that she was born in North Carolina to Silias Laster and Orpie Laster.

In the 1860 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Silas Lassiter, 38; wife Orpie,34; and children Sallie, 12, Mary, 11, James, 9, John, 7, Elizabeth, 5, Penina, 4, Hardy, 3, Silas, 1, and George, 3 months, and Delpha Simpson, 14.

On 7 December 1866, Mathew Lassiter married Delpha Simpson in Wilson County. [Mathew was Delpha’s uncle by marriage, brother of her step-father Silas Lassiter.]

In the 1870 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Mathew Lassiter, 47; wife Delphy, 24; and children Harriet, 3, unnamed, 1 month, and Thomas Lassiter, 2.

In the 1880 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Nathan Blackwell, 40; his wife Mary Blackwell, 55; 36 year-old servant Delpha Lassiter; Harriet Lassiter, 14, and Nathan Lassiter, 4; Charlotte Baker, 70; and Edwin Blackwell, 17.

Nathan Blackwell and Delphia Lassiter married 30 January 1890 in Wilson County. In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: 59 year-old day laborer Nathan Blackwell; wife Delpha, 53; daughter-in-law [stepdaughter?] Harriet, 33; and Harriet’s children James, 16, Jonas, 13, Martha, 11, and Peter, 10.

  • Nathan Blackwell

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In 1860, Nathan E. Blackwell, 20, is listed as a wagoner living in the household of white farmer Robinson Baker in Old Fields township, Wilson County.

In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: 31 year-old farm laborer Nathan Blackwell, 42 year-old Mary Blackwell, and 6 year-old Edwin Blackwell.

In the 1880 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Nathan Blackwell, 40; his wife Mary Blackwell, 55; 36 year-old servant Delpha Lassiter; Harriet Lassiter, 14, and Nathan Lassiter, 4; Charlotte Baker, 70; and Edwin Blackwell, 17.

Nathan Blackwell and Delphia Lassiter married 30 January 1890 in Wilson County. In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: 59 year-old day laborer Nathan Blackwell; wife Delpha, 53; daughter-in-law [stepdaughter?] Harriet, 33; and Harriet’s children James, 16, Jonas, 13, Martha, 11, and Peter, 10.

  • Jonas Blackwell

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Jonah Blackwell died 22 December 1916 in Indianapolis after being struck in the head with a stove poker. Nathan Blackwell (below) was informant.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: 59 year-old day laborer Nathan Blackwell; wife Delpha, 53; daughter-in-law [stepdaughter?] Harriet, 33; and Harriet’s children James, 16, Jonas, 13, Martha, 11, and Peter, 10.

On 26 August 1910, Jonah Blackwell, 23, of Wilson, North Carolina, and son of Nathan Blackwell and Harriet Black, married Clara Martin in Indianapolis.

  • Nathan Blackwell

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Nathan Blackwell died in Indianapolis on 20 January 1946. His death certificate reports that he was born in Wilson County to unknown parents.

In the 1880 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Nathan Blackwell, 40; his wife Mary Blackwell, 55; 36 year-old servant Delpha Lassiter; Harriet Lassiter, 14, and Nathan Lassiter, 4; Charlotte Baker, 70; and Edwin Blackwell, 17.

On 17 October 1894, Nathan Blackwell, 26, married Bertha Paton in Marion County, Indiana.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: factory laborer Nathan Blackwell, 35, Tennessee-born wife Bertha Bell, 35, and daughter A.J., 3, plus a boarder.

On 28 November 1916, Nathan Blackwell, son of Nathaniel Blackwell and Delphia Laster, married Lulu Winkfield in Indianapolis.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 2345 Baltimore Street, railroad boilermaker Nathan Blackwell, 45, Tennessee-born wife Lola, 37, and daughter Jane A., 13.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 2345 Baltimore Street, railroad laborer Nathan Blackwell, 57, wife Lola, 42, and daughter Jane Young, 23.

In the 1940 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 2345 Baltimore Street, steam railroad laborer Nathan Blackwell, 76, wife Lulu, 67, and nephew Pete Demunery, 48.

  • Nancy Newsome Baker

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Nancy Baker died 28 December 1952 in Indianapolis. Her death certificate reports that she was born in Wilson County, North Carolina, on 18 August 1880 to Tonie Newson and an unknown mother.

In the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: Toney Newsome, 61, wife Jane, 41, and children Benjamin, 20, Mary, 13, Gastin, 11, and Nancy, 8.

On 18 November 1889, Benjamin Baker, 20, son of Ephriam and Margarett Baker, of Cross Roads, married Nancy Newsome, 18, daughter of Tony and Jane Newsome, in Cross Roads township.

In the 1940 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: widow Nancy Baker, 70, was a boarder in the household of Harvey Coleman at 1058 Traub Avenue.

  • Mary Simms Berry

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Mary Berry died in Indianapolis on 30 November 1958. Her death certificate reports that she was born 23 January 1874 in Wilson, North Carolina, to Jeff Simms and Carolyn Shirley.

Jefrey Simms, son of Willis Hagans and Dicey Simms, married Carolin Barnes, daughter of Robert Dupree and Meneney Dupree, on 19 April 1869 in Wilson County. In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Jeffrey Simms, 24, wife Caroline, 21, and an unnamed one month-old daughter.

In the 1880 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: North Carolina-born laborer Jeff Sims, 35, wife Carline, 25, and daughters Martha, 10, Maliza, 6, Lillie, 3, and Laura, 1.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Center township, Marion County, Indiana: at 746 Walnut, North Carolina-born widow Caroline Simms, 47, a washerwoman, with daughters Mary, 27, Laura, 21, and Bessie, 17. Mary was a divorced washerwoman. Laura was a servant, and Bessie, the only child born in Indiana, was a student.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1316 Columbia, Kentucky-born Lee H. Clemmons, 29, wife Laura, 29, widowed sister-in-law Mary Berry, 32, and a lodger. Lee was a saloon bartender and Mary worked as a housemaid.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: North Carolina-born Mary E. Berry, 44, divorced, lived alone in a rented home and worked as a cook for a private family.

  • Laura Simms Clemmons

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Jefrey Simms, son of Willis Hagans and Dicey Simms, married Carolin Barnes, daughter of Robert Dupree and Meneney Dupree, on 19 April 1869 in Wilson County. In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Jeffrey Simms, 24, wife Caroline, 21, and an unnamed one month-old daughter.

In the 1880 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: North Carolina-born laborer Jeff Sims, 35, wife Carline, 25, and daughters Martha, 10, Maliza, 6, Lillie, 3, and Laura, 1.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Center township, Marion County, Indiana: at 746 Walnut, North Carolina-born widow Caroline Simms, 47, a washerwoman, with daughters Mary, 27, Laura, 21, and Bessie, 17. Mary was a divorced washerwoman. Laura was a servant, and Bessie, the only child born in Indiana, was a student.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1316 Columbia, Kentucky-born Lee H. Clemmons, 29, wife Laura, 29, widowed sister-in-law Mary Berry, 32, and a lodger. Lee was a saloon bartender and Mary worked as a housemaid.

  • Floyd Woodard

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Floyd Woodard died in Indianapolis on 26 April 1995. His death certificate reports that he was born in Wilson, North Carolina, on 1 May 1904 to Fred and Mary Ann Sauls Woodard and was buried there in Rest Haven cemetery. Floyd did not migrate to Indiana until well into adulthood; he registered in Wilson for the World War II draft.

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  • Wiley C. Bunn

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Wiley C. Bunn died in Indianapolis at his home at 2044 Ralston on 4 December 1941. His death certificate reports that he was born on 8 July 1873 in Wilson to Charlie Bunn and worked as a city street sweeper.

On 28 October 1899, Wiley Bunn, 27, of North Carolina, son of Charles Bunn, married Mattie Anderson in Marion County, Indiana.

In the 1900 census of Warren, Marion County, Indiana: Wiley Bunn, 26, and wife Mattie, 27, who had been born in Utah to North Carolina-born parents. Wiley worked as a street car laborer.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: on 5715 Bona Avenue, street laborer Wilie Bunn, 36, Virginia-born wife Mattie H., 38, a laundress, and father Chas. Bunn, 73.

Wiley C. Bunn married Julia A. Mitchell in Marion County, Indiana, on 5 September 1915.

On 12 September 1918, Wiley C. Bunn, 45, of 1803 Alvord Street in Indianapolis registered for the World War I draft. He listed his occupation as railroader for Mead Construction Company and Julia Bunn as his nearest relative. He was described as medium height and build with brown eyes and black hair.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2044 Ralston Avenue, owned and valued at $2000, Wiley Bunn, 55, a city laborer, and Kentucky-born wife Julia, 44.

In the 1940 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2044 Ralston Avenue, owned and valued at $800, Wiley Bunn, 66, a street cleaner, wife Julia, 63, and daughter Mary C. Donawy, 9.

  • Jason Cornelius Farmer

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In the 1880 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: Warren Farmer, 37, wife Nancy, 24, and children Ella, 13, Rosann, 11, Harriett, 10, Julia, 9, Abel, 5, and Jason, 1, all born in North Carolina.

On 23 February 1897, Jason Farmer, 28, married Hannah Aretts in Marion County, Indiana.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2313 Oxford, Jason C. Farmer, 37, wife Hannah, 46, and stepdaughters Maggie, 25, Ardena, 14, and Pennie Artis, 12.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2325 Oxford, foundry worker Jason C. Farmer, 46, wife Hannah, 56, and stepdaughter Penetta Artis, 22, a hairdresser, all born in North Carolina.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2325 Oxford, automobile shop laborer J.C. Farmer, 55, wife Hannah, 60, son-in-law Osborne Ballenger, 26, and daughter Pettie, 32.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2329 Oxford, Jason C. Farmer, 60, and wife Hannah, 75.

In the 1940 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2313 Oxford, widower J.C. Farmer, 62, working as a retail grocery truck driver.

  • Hannah Ellis Artis Farmer

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Hannah Farmer died 6 April 1935 in Indianapolis. Her death certificate reports that she was born 12 April 1852 in North Carolina to Jack and Margaret Ellis.

In the 1870 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Jackson Ellis, 45, wife Margaret, 36, children Hannah, 17, and Hewel, 11, and Hannah Ellis Sr., 90, plus Lucy, 2, and Mary Simms, 1.

On 29 February 1872, John Artist, son of Arch and Rose Artist, married Hannah Ellis, daughter of Jack and Margaret Ellis at H. Dew’s.

In the 1880 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: John Artice, 40, wife Hannah, 23, and daughters Mary L., 10, Margaret, 8, and Susan, 1 month.

On 23 February 1897, Jason Farmer, 28, married Hannah Aretts [Artis] in Marion County, Indiana.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2313 Oxford, Jason C. Farmer, 37, wife Hannah, 46, and stepdaughters Maggie, 25, Ardena, 14, and Pennie Artis, 12.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2325 Oxford, foundry worker Jason C. Farmer, 46, wife Hannah, 56, and stepdaughter Penetta Artis, 22, a hairdresser, all born in North Carolina.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2325 Oxford, automobile shop laborer J.C. Farmer, 55, wife Hannah, 60, son-in-law Osborne Ballenger, 26, and daughter Pettie, 32.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2329 Oxford, Jason C. Farmer, 60, and wife Hannah, 75.

  • Ardena Artis Hamm

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In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2313 Oxford, Jason C. Farmer, 37, wife Hannah, 46, and stepdaughters Maggie, 25, Ardena, 14, and Pennie Artis, 12.

On 20 July 1912, Ardena Artis, 26, daughter of John Artis and Hannah Farmer, married John H. Hamm, son of Ben Hamm and Mary Jones, in Marion County, Indiana.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2020 Alvord, John Ham, 34, and wife Ardena, 35.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1038 Roache, gas plant janitor John H. Hamm, 40, and wife Ardena, 41.

In the 1940 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: Ardena Hamm, 52, servant, in the household of Margaret Aufderheide.

Indiana Death Certificates, 1899-2011 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

 

The last will and testament of Esther McGowan.

I, Esther McGowan of the County of Wilson and State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory, do make and declare this to be my last Will and Testiment in manner and form following to wit: First that my executor hereinafter named shall provide for my body a decent burial suitable to the wishes of my relatives and friends, and pay all my funeral expenses together with my just debts howsoever and to whomsoever owing out of the first monies that shall come into his hands as a part or parcel of my estate.

Item 1st  I give and devise unto my beloved grand daughter Alice Moore All the property which I have except such as shall be hereinafter set forth, to the said Alice Moore to have and to hold to her self the said Alice Moore during her natural life.

Item 2nd I give and devise to my great-grand children, namely: Charlie Moore and Hester Moore one bed each.

Item 3rd After the death of the said Alice Moore, all of said property given and devised to her shall be given to the heirs of the said Alice Moore, during their natural lives, and after their deaths, then to their heirs and assigns forever And lastly I hereby constitute and appoint my friend Charles Battle Executor to this my last Will and Testiment. I hereby declare utterly void all former Wills and Testiments made by me In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal. This the 18th day of July A.D. 1895.  Esther (X) McGowan

Witnesses /s/ S.A. Smith, Chas. H. Darden

——

In the 1870 census of the Town of Wilson, Wilson County: Estha McGowan, 70, and Alice McGowan, 16.

On 28 January 1875, Prince Moore, 21, married Allice McGowan, 22, in Wilson County.

In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County, Esther McGowan, 65; daughter Alice, 25, cook; and son-in-law Prince Moore, 25, laborer.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: widowed cook Alice Moore, 40, with children Hester, 12, and Wilbert T., 11.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 923 Para Street, Alice Moore, 49; son Charles, 27, a store porter; daughter-in-law Lizzie, 30; grandson Sylvester T., 1; and son Wilbert, 16. Alice, Charles and Wilbert were born in North Carolina; Lizzie in Tennessee; and Sylvester in Indiana.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 809 West Pratt Street, Charles Moore, 38; wife Elizabeth, 40; children Sylvester, 11, Beatrice, 7, and Ruth, 6; mother Alice, 65; and brother Wilbur, 26.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 809 West Pratt Street, hotel porter Charles Moore, 38; wife Elizabeth, 50; children Sylvester, 21, a station porter, Beatrice, 17, and Ruth, 16; mother Alice, 65; brother Wilbert, 37, a railroad station janitor, and nephew Wilbert Jr., 10.

Alice Moore died 4 June 1946 at her home at 809 West 9th Street in Indianapolis, Indiana. Her death certificate reports that she was born 10 March 1852 [the year is incorrect] in Wilson, North Carolina, to John Bright and Mary McGown; that she had resided in Indianapolis for 43 years; that she was buried in Crown Hill cemetery; and that her informant was Charles Moore.

Charles Moore died at home on 27 May 1947 in Indianapolis, Indiana. His death certificate reports that he was born 22 November 1883 in Wilson, North Carolina, to Prince Moore and Alice McGowan; was married to Elizabeth Moore; worked as a porter at Fannie May’s Candy Shop; and was buried in Crown Hill cemetery.

Wilbert T. Moore died 14 February 1963 at his home at 937 Camp Street in Indianapolis, Indiana. His death certificate reports that he was born 6 November 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; was married to Ida Moore; worked as a laborer for B&O railroad; and was buried in Crown Hill cemetery.