migration to Indiana

Sarah Artist Battle of Indianapolis, Indiana.

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Indianapolis Recorder, 1 October 1938.

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In the 1880 census of Greencastle township, Putnam County, Indiana: farmhand Jonathan Artis, 47; wife Margret, 39; and children Evert, 19, Gray, 16, Sarah, 14, Tamer, 12, Minnie, 10, Rose, 8, John, 6, Jonathan, 4, and Willie, 2.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2419 North Oxford, Margaret Artist, 57, and children John, 24, day laborer, Jonathan, 22, grocery deliveryman, Willie, 22, railroad section laborer, and Sarrah, 34.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: Margaret Artist, 67, with family members John, 30, Emma, 34, and Damon Artis, 8; Ralph, 13, and Mona McWilliams, 8; and Rose, 29, and Sarah Artist, 40.

In the 1930 census of Greencastle, Putnam County, Indiana: in a house owned and valued at $300, Anthony Battle, 70, farmer, and wife Sarah, 70, both of North Carolina.

Sarah Artist Battle died 27 September 1938 in Evansville, Indiana. Per her death certificate, she was about 72 years old; was born in North Carolina to Jonathan Artist and Margaret Woodard; was married; and resided in Greencastle, Indiana.

Minerva Louise Ward Artis Biggins Hanks.

After he left Wilson, Joseph H. Ward‘s close family members migrated to Washington, D.C. Once he was established in Indianapolis, Indiana, however, his mother Mittie Ward Vaughn and younger half-sister Minerva Vaughn, also known as Minerva Ward, joined him in the Midwest.

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In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Sarah Darden, 57, son-in-law Algia Vaughn, 23, daughter Mittie, 22, and grandchildren Joseph, 8, Sarah, 6, and Macinda Vaughn, 5 months. [Joseph “Vaughn” was actually Joseph Ward, listed with his stepfather’s surname.]

In the 1900 census of Washington, D.C: William Moody, 27, wife Sarah S., 24, and children Augustus, 5, and Crist Moody, 4, plus sister-in-law Minerva Vaughn, 10, mother-in-law Mittie Vaughn, 46, and mother Fannie Harris, 55, all born in North Carolina.

Indianapolis News, 12 December 1903.

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Indianapolis News, 2 January 1909.

On 11 June 1910, Minerva Ward married S. Dillard Artis, of Marion, Indiana, son of Thomas and Esther Hall Artis (who were migrants to Indiana from Wayne County, North Carolina.) Per Grant County Indiana Biographies, www.genealogytrails.com, Artis “began as janitor of the court house located in Marion, Indiana in 1900. He later accepted private contracts trimming trees, laying sod and making lawns. This work led to contracts for digging cellars, sewer and cement work, street building, and finally municipal contracting. Dillard had a cement contract connected with the $100,000 residence of J. W. Wilson, with the First Baptist Church and numerous others as well as finishing contracts on tar via roads amounting to $840,000 in 1914.” (Artis’ first wife, Asenath Peters Artis, died in December 1909.)

Indianapolis News, 18 June 1910.

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Indianapolis Star, 26 June 1910.

In 1911, Dr. Ward and his young son, Joseph Jr., visited his sister and mother in Marion.

Indianapolis News, 19 August 1911.

Per Google Street View, the house at 920 South Boots Street, Marion, Indiana, today.

Dillard and Minerva Artis’ social life was occasionally noted in Indiana newspapers. For example, in 1915, they were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Beverly Lafoon of Kokomo, Indiana.

Kokomo Daily Tribune, 10 April 1915.

And in 1916 they joined the J.H. Weavers of Weaver, Indiana, for dinner.

Indianapolis Recorder, 4 November 1916.

But just a few weeks later:

Indianapolis Recorder, 25 November 1916.

In the 1920 census of Chicago, Cook County, Illinois: at 486 South Wabash, Diller Artis, 44; wife Minerva, 41; mother-in-law Mittie Ward, 56; and three lodgers, John Smith, 30, and William, 49, and Anna Brown, 46. Artis was working as a railroad poster. [What happened?] Minerva claimed that she and her father were born in Indiana. [In fact, both were born in North Carolina.]

The couple apparently divorced between 1920 and 1923.  On 1 January 1923, Minerva Ward married Jonas B. Biggins in Denver, Colorado. (Dillard Artis died in 1947 in Evanston, Illinois.)

The 1935 Denver, Colorado, city directory lists Jonas B. Biggins as a Pullman porter and Minerva Biggins as a charwoman at the Custom House.

However, per Findagrave.com, Jonas B. Biggins died in 1935 and was buried in Denver. On 15 July 1936, Minerva Louise Biggins married John Q. Hanks in Greeley, Colorado. The couple is listed in the 1936 Denver directory living in the home Minerva had shared with her previous husband.

In the 1940 census of Denver, Colorado: at 1433 East 25th, owned and valued at $4000, John Q. Hanks, 49, butler; wife Minerva, 37; and son Roy, 7. [Roy was born in Illinois. Whose son was he — John’s or Minerva’s?]

In 1942, John Q. Hanks registered for the World War II draft in Denver. Per his registration card, he lived at 1433 – 25th Avenue, Denver; was born 5 February 1889 in Osage, Kansas; his contact was wife Louise Hanks; and he worked for Laurence C. Phipps, 3400 Belcaro Drive, Denver.

John Hanks died in May 1966 in Denver. I have not found a death date for Minerva Ward Artis Biggins Hanks.

Ruby Jane Lassiter comes home.

Ruby Jane Lassiter, born 19 August 1923 in Wilson, N.C., died 30 August 1943 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

On 30 August 1943, two months after she arrived in Indianapolis (and 11 days after her birthday), 20 year-old Ruby Jane Lassiter was dead. Her family entrusted her body to Jacobs Brothers Funeral Home, and the newly digitized records of that establishment detail the arrangements to bring her home.

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(Plummer D. and Cary D. Jacobs, born in 1897 and 1901 in Dudley, Wayne County, North Carolina, were the nephews of Jesse A. Jacobs, Jr.)

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In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: at 709 Lipscomb Road, owned and valued at $1000, truck gardener Jesse C. Lassiter, 41, widower, and children Jesse C., Jr., 15, James D., 13, Ernest D., 12, Annie B., 10, Mildred P., 8, Ruby J., 7, Lesie D., 6, Harvey G., 5, and Wade, 2. [Mildred Lassiter Sherrod died six months prior to her sister Ruby, also of tuberculosis.]

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 709 Lipscomb Road, WPA laborer Jessie Lassiter, 50, and children Ruby, 16, Lessie L., 15, Harvey, 14, and Wade, 12.

Many thanks to Allen County (Ind.) Public Library’s Genealogy Center, the Indiana African American Genealogy Group, and the Indiana Genealogical Society for collaborating to digitize Jacobs Brothers Funeral Home’s records and to digitalblackhistory.com for bringing this database to my attention.

On the occasion of his historical marker dedication, another account of Dr. Ward’s appointment.

This weekend, with his granddaughter and great-grandchildren in attendance, the Indiana Historical Bureau, the American Legion, and the Association for the Study of African American Life and History will dedicate a historical marker commemorating the lifetime achievements of Wilson native Dr. Joseph H. Ward. Though I’ve blogged about him here and here and here and here, this seemed an appropriate time to feature yet another long newspaper article detailing Dr. Ward’s accomplishments.

 

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“The appointment of Dr. [Joseph H.] Ward to this position marks a decided step forward for the race. In many respects this may be regarded as the highest office to which a Negro has ever been appointed, certainly the most responsible.”

Topeka Plaindealer, 25 July 1924.

Photos courtesy of L. Bates.

The Kerseys.

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John Kearsey married Julia Richardson in Franklin County, North Carolina, in 1849. Both were free people of color. The couple migrated to the Town of Wilson prior to 1860.

In the 1860 census of Wilson, Wilson County: John Kersey, 37, blacksmith; wife Julia, 31; and children Louisa, 9, Dellah, 6, John, 5, and William, 1.  Kersey reported personal property valued at $300.

In the 1870 census of Wilson, Wilson County: blacksmith John Kirsey, 45, wife Julia, 42, and children Louisa, 19, Idella, 16, John, 13, Walter, 10, and Robt., 9.

In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County: blacksmith John Kersey, 61; wife Julia, 53; and son Walter, 21; plus boarder William Joyner, who worked in the blacksmith shop.

John and Julia Kersey’s children included:

  • Louisa Kersey — Louisa Kersey Johnson died 15 January 1934 in Wilson after a fall from her front porch. Per her death certificate, she was 78 years old; was born in North Carolina to John and Julia Kersey; was married to Henry Johnson and lived at 503 Warren Street. Gertrude Jones, 309 Elba Street, was informant.
  • Ardella Kersey
  • John Kersey Jr.
  • William Kersey
  • Walter Kersey 
  • Robert Kersey — like Walter, Robert Kersey migrated to Indiana. Robert Kersey died 30 August 1902 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Per his death certificate, he was 36 years old; was born in North Carolina to John Kersey and Julia Robinson; and worked as a laborer.

They are non-residents of this state.

Hardy Lassiter died about 1853 in a section of Edgecombe County that two years later became part of the newly created Wilson County. During the probate of his estate, the court ordered this ad placed in an attempt to locate his daughter Sally Lassiter Artis and her husband, Morrison Artis.

The Tarborough Southerner, 24 September 1853.

Where were the Artises?  Indiana.

Morrison Artis, son of Micajah and Bedie Powell Artis, was born about 1822 in or near what would become Wilson County. His father Micajah is listed as a head of household in the 1830 census of Taylor district, Nash County, and the 1840 census of Davis district, Wayne County. Morrison Artis married Sarah “Sally” Lassiter circa 1845. Born about 1827 in what was then Edgecombe County, she was the daughter of Hardy and Obedience Lassiter. Morrison and Sally’s first child, Benjamin F. Artis, was born in 1847, and within a year or so the family struck out for Indiana with Morrison’s family.

In the 1850 census of District 85, Parke County, Indiana: Morrison Artis, 24, farmer; wife Sarah, 21; and children Benjamin, 3, and Rachel, 6 months. All except Rachel were born in North Carolina.

In the 1850 census of District 85, Parke County, Indiana: Micajah Artis, 50, farmer; wife Bedy, 40; and children Arcada, 17, Eliza, 14, Burket, 4, and Henriette, 1. All but Henriette were born in North Carolina.

In the 1860 census of Reserve township, Parke County, Indiana: farmer Morrison Artis, 35; wife Sally, 33; and children Benjamin, 13, Rachel. 10, and Martha, 5. Morrison reported owning $1000 in real property and $465 in personal property.

In the 1860 census of Adam township, Parke County, Indiana: Micajah Artis, 58, farmer; wife Beda, 50; and children Birket, 16, Henrietta, 10, Elmeda, 8, and Benson, 7.

Per Early Black Settlements by County, indianahistory.org, “During the 1850s, the Bassett, Artis and Ellis families left Parke County, Indiana, and established a settlement in Ervin Township. (The Bassett and Artis families were free African Americans who came to Indiana from North Carolina.)  At least 11 families lived in this area that became a small farming community of blacks sometime known as the Bassett Settlement or the Bassett and Ellis Settlement.  They had a school, church, cemetery (located at 950 W.), general store, blacksmith shop and a post office.  Some of the other surnames associated with the settlement include Canady, Griggs, Jones, Kirby, Mosely, and Wilson.

“Zachariah and Richard Bassett served as ministers at the Free Union Baptist Church in Howard County.  The 1870 census list Bassetts, Artis, and Ellis as farmers.  Richard had land valued at $8,400 and Morrison Artis’s land was valued at $2,800.  In 1892, Richard Bassett became the third black person to be elected to the Indiana state legislature.”

The heart of the Bassett Settlement as shown in this 1877 plat map. Two parcels are labeled M. Artis — one, perhaps, Micajah and the other Morrison. A small cross is visible at the center of the image in a parcel marked R. Bassett; it marks the community cemetery in which the older Artises were buried. [For an account of my visit to Bassett cemetery and a family connection to this place, see here and here.]

In the 1870 census of Ervin township, Howard County, Indiana: Morrison Artis, 46; wife Sarah, 40; and children Benjamin, 23, Martha, 16, and William, 1. Morrison reported owning $2800 in real property and $500 in personal property.

In the 1870 census of Ervin township, Howard County, Indiana: Macajah Artis, 65, farmer; wife Bedea, 65; and children Henrietta, 22, Almedia, 20, and Benson 17. Morrison reported owning $700 in real property and $100 in personal property.

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Indianapolis Leader, 30 August 1879.

In the 1880 census of Ervin township, Howard County, Indiana: farmer Morrison Artis, 57; wife Sarah, 55; children Benjamin, 33, Martha, 26, and William M., 11; and grandson Melvin, 8.

In 1891, Morrison Artis was nearly swindled from his life’s accumulation in a fraudulent land transaction.

Kokomo Saturday Tribune, 12 May 1891.

Morrison Artis died in April 1896 after terrible head injuries sustained when his spooked horse threw him, then fell on him.

Kokomo Daily Tribune, 9 April 1896.

Benjamin F. Artis died 8 September 1910 in Coopers Grove, Howard County, Indiana. Per his death certificate, he was born 10 February 1947 in North Carolina to Morrison Artis and Sarah Lassiter; was married to Caroline Artis; and was a retired laborer.

Melvina Bassett died 7 April 1917 in Kokomo, Howard County, Indiana. Per her death certificate, she was born April 1839 in North Carolina to Micajah Artis and Bedie Powell; was the widow of John Bassett; and was buried in Bassett cemetery. William Bassett was informant.

Benson Artis died 17 April 1919 in Kokomo, Howard County, Indiana. Per his death certificate, he was 56 years old; was born in Indiana to M. Artis and an unknown mother; was single; lived at 145 Western Avenue, Kokomo.

William M. Artis died 27 August 1920 in Indianapolis. Per his death certificate, he was born 26 February 1869 in Indiana to Morrison Artis and an unknown mother; was married to Lula Artis; worked as a laborer; and was buried in Kokomo.

U.S. Indexed County Land Ownership Maps, 1860-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Jonathan Artist (Jr.) of Indianapolis, Indiana.

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Indianapolis Star, 27 October 1945.

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In the 1880 census of Greencastle township, Putnam County, Indiana: farmhand Jonathan Artis, 47; wife Margret, 39; and children Evert, 19, Gray, 16, Sarah, 14, Tamer, 12, Minnie, 10, Rose, 8, John, 6, Jonathan, 4, and Willie, 2.

In 1894, Jonathan Artist graduated from Brightwood School’s eighth grade class.

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Indianapolis News, 6 June 1894.

He was the sole “colored” member of the Brightwood High School graduating class of 1896. Per an article printed in the 6 June 1896 of the Indianapolis Journal, as part of commencement exercises, he read an eight-minute essay on “The New Lochinvar.”

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Indianapolis News, 22 May 1896.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2419 Oxford, Margret Artis, 57, widow, and children John, 24, day laborer, Jonathan, 22, grocery deliverer, Willie, 20, railroad section hand, and Sarrah, 34, all born in North Carolina.

On 3 December 1902, Jonathan Artist married Carrie Broshiers in Marion County, Indiana.

Indianapolis Sun, 1 December 1902.

Twelve years after graduation, Artist was advocating on behalf of children at school in the Oak Hill neighborhood. The school site was too far from the homes of the children it served, he complained. Though the school board’s business director was instructed to consult a house mover about relocating the building, “it is not likely that the school will be moved.”

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Indianapolis Star, 15 July 1908.

Elliott Artist was born 4 July 1909 in Indianapolis, Indiana, to Jonathan Artis, 32, of North Carolina, a laborer, and Carrie Broshier, 27, of Indiana. The family resided at 2623 North Oxford, and Elliott was the fifth of five children, all of whom were surviving. [This child was later known as Francis Artist.]

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 2623 North Oxford, grocery company laborer Jonathan Artist, 29; wife Cary, 28; children Cecil, 7, Thelma, 6, Raymond, 4, Juanita, 2, and Francis, 9 months; father-in-law Abner Broshier, 65; sister-in-law Alice Broshier, 34; brother-in-law David Broshier, 21; and sisters-in-law Maiza, 19, and Eva Broshier, 16.

George Gilbert Artist was born 8 June 1911 in Indianapolis, Indiana, to Jonathan Artis, 32, of North Carolina, a laborer, and Carrie Broshears, 29, of Indiana, a housewife. The family resided at 2623 Oxford Street, and George was the sixth of six children, all of whom were surviving.

Leslie Artist was born 25 November 1912 in Indianapolis, Indiana, to John Artis, 31, of North Carolina, a grocery driver, and Carrie Broshier, 29, of Indiana, a housewife. The family resided at 1930 Columbia Avenue, and Leslie was the seventh of seven children, all of whom were surviving.

An unnamed male child was born 7 December 1915 in Indianapolis, Indiana, to Jonathan Artis, 38, of North Carolina, and Carrie Brochere, 29, of Indiana. The family resided at 1930 Columbia Street, and the child was the eighth of eight children, of whom seven were surviving. [This child’s birth certificate was not filed until 13 December 1915 and in the intervening week the attending physician misremembered the baby’s birthdate. Per his death certificate, “Infant Jonathan Artist” was born premature on 6 December 1915 and died 7 December. ]

Juanita Artis died 26 August 1916 in Indianapolis of tetanus contracted from a splinter in her foot. Per her death certificate, she was born 9 September 1906 in Indianapolis to Jonathan Artist and Carrie Broshears and lived at 2148 Arsenal Avenue.

An unnamed male child was born 5 December 1916 in Indianapolis, Indiana, to Jonathan Artis, 38, of North Carolina, a porter, and Carrie Broshire, 30, of Indiana. The family resided at 2144 North Arsenal, and the child was the ninth of nine children, of whom seven were surviving. [This was son Cornelius “Neal” Artis.]

An unnamed male child was born 6 July 1919 in Indianapolis, Indiana, to Jonathan Artis, 41, of North Carolina, and Carrie Broshire, 33, of Indiana. The family resided at 2508 Euclid, and the child was the ninth of nine children [sic, he was tenth of ten], of whom eight were surviving.

In 1919, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & Saint Louis Railroad Company police snatched up Artist while he was walking near the railway and locked him on a vagrancy charge. The city court threw out the case, and Artist sued for false imprisonment.

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Indianapolis Star, 29 May 1919.

In the 1920 census of of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: on Phipp Street, grocery driver Jonethan Artist, 48; wife Carrie, 34;  and children Cecil, 17, Thelma, 15, Raymond, 14, Francis, 10, George, 8, Leseley, 7, Cornelius, 3, and Burton, 6 months.

Seven months later, Artist’s case was “compromised,” or settled, when he accepted a $250 payment from the railroad company.

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Indianapolis News, 16 February 1920.

In 1923, Jonathan Artist took on the school board, filing suit for equal treatment for his children. Though they were allowed to attend School No. 51 (now James Russell Lowell School No. 51) with white children, they were excluded from classrooms and forced to sit in closets to receive instruction.

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Indianapolis News, 28 November 1923.

Cecil Artist died 17 December 1924 in Indianapolis. Per his death certificate, he was born 4 January 1903 to John Artist of North Carolina and Carrie Broshears of Indiana; was a school boy; and resided at 2508 Euclid.

Carrie Artist died 3 October 1928 in Indianapolis. Per her death certificate, she was born 8 January [1881] in Indiana to Abner Broshiers of Kentucky and Luella Winfrey of Kentucky; was married to Jonathan Artist; and lived at 2508 Euclid Avenue.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 2508 Euclid Avenue, owned and valued at $1800, grocery salesman Jonathan Artist, 51, widower; and children Thelma, 25, Raymond, 24, coal yard chauffeur, Francis, 20, odd jobs laborer, George, 18, dog pound chauffeur, Leslie, 17, garage repairman, Cornelius, 13, and Vincent, 10.

Raymond Artist died 21 August 1933 in Indianapolis. Per his death certificate, he was born 31 December 1906 in Indianapolis to Jonathan Artist of North Carolina and Carrie Broshear of Evansville, Indiana; worked as a mechanic; and was single.

In the 1940 census of of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 2508 Euclid Avenue, retail grocery clerk Johnathan Artist, 54, widower; and children Cornelius, 23, coal yard foreman, Vincent, 20, and Leslie, 26, both glass manufacturing laborers, and daughter-in-law Sarah, 18.

Indianapolis Recorder, 29 January 1944.

Leslie Artis died 30 October 1961 in Indianapolis. Per his death certificate, he was born 24 November 1913 in Indianapolis to Jonathan Artist and Carrie Broshiers; lived at 222 1/2 West 18th Street; and worked as a fertilizer company laborer. Widow Sadie  Artist was informant.

Thelma Artist died 28 April 1978 in Indianapolis. Per her death certificate, she was born 32 March 1904 in Indianapolis to Jonathan Artist and Carrie (last name unknown); lived at 2508 North Euclid Avenue; and worked as a domestic worker. Vincent Artist was informant.

Francis Artist died 27 May 1981 in Indianapolis. Per his death certificate, he was born 4 July 1909 in Indianapolis to Jonathan Artist and Carrie (last name unknown); was divorced; and worked as a construction worker. Vincent Artist was informant.

Vincent Artist died 15 April 1986 in Indianapolis. Per his death certificate, he was born 6 July 1919 in Indianapolis to Johnathan Artist and Carrie Brosheres; was never married; worked as a automotive repairman; and lived at 2508 North Euclid. Brother Neal Artist was informant.

George G. Artist died 19 June 1991 in Indianapolis. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 June 1911 in Indianapolis to Jonathan Artist and Carrie Breshere and was a U.S. post office mail handler. Informant was daughter Roselyn Artist.

Neal C. Artist died 6 December 2006 in Indianapolis. Per his death certificate, he was born 5 December 1916 in Indianapolis to Jonathan Artist and Carrie (last name unknown); was a widower; and worked as a tool and die inspector.

Nancy Newsome Baker of Indianapolis, Indiana.

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Indianapolis News, 30 November 1952.

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In the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Toney Newsome, 61; wife Jane, 41; and children Benjamin, 20, Mary, 13, Gastin, 11, and Nancy, 8.

On 17 April 1889, Benjamin Baker, 20, of Cross Roads township, son of Ephriam and Margaret Baker, married Nancy Newsom, 18, of Cross Roads township, daughter of Tony and Jane Newsom, in Cross Roads township.

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: widow Nancy Baker, 30, farmhand, and children Sarah J., 9, Tony, 7, and Stella, 3.

In the 1940 census of Center township, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 1058 Traub Avenue, Nancy Baker, 70, and Sarha Gregory, 70 [sic], boarders. Both women were born in North Carolina.

Nancy Baker died 28 November 1952 at her home at 908 South Penn Street, Indianapolis. Per her death certificate, she was born 18 August 1880 in Wilson County, N.C., to Tonie Newson; was a widow; and was buried in New Crown cemetery. Stella Maxwell was informant.

Sarah Gregory died 30 December 1966 in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 March 1891 in North Carolina to Benny Baker and Nancy Newsome and worked as a hotel maid.

Stella Maxwell died 17 October 2000 in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana. Per her death certificate, she was born 24 April 1900 to Ernest Thomlingson and Nancy Newson in Wilson, N.C.; was widowed; and was buried in New Crown cemetery.

Henry and Annie Conner Joyner of Indianapolis, Indiana.

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Indianapolis News, 17 February 1940.

On 26 May 1886, Henry Joyner, 30, married Annie Conner, 20, in Wilson. A.M.E. Zion minister J.N. Rasberry. Witnesses were S.H. Vick, E.C. Simms and H. Haywood.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 949 King Avenue, laborer Henry Joyner, 49; wife Annie, 39; and children Edwin, 13, Stella, 11, Lama, 9, George, 7, Thomas, 4, and Cora, 2; plus boarder Bennet Beachem, 71.

In the 1902 Indianapolis city directory: Joyner Henry, lab, h 1011 N Tremont av

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 1117 Tremont Street, Henry Joyner, 55, laborer; wife Annie, 44; and children Edwin, 23, Lama, 18, George, 16, Thomas, 14, Cora, 11, Cecil, 9, and Henry, 7.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 1117 Tremont Street, Henry Joyner, 60, railroad car cleaner; wife Annie, 50; and children Lama, 28, seamstress for garment cleaner, George, 26, and Thomas, 24, both foundry core pasters.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 2858 Highland Park, rented for $25/month, steam railway laborer Henry Joyner, 73, born in North Carolina; wife Annie, 65, born in North Carolina; son George E., 36, building construction laborer; and grandchildren Harry Booker, 10, and Chas. R. Joyner, 7.

Henry Joyner died 11 February 1940 at his home at 2858 Highland Place, Indianapolis. Per her death certificate, he was born 15 October 1861 in Wilson, N.C., to unknown parents; was married to Annie P. Joyner; and was buried at Crown Hill.

Annie P. Conner Joyner died February 1949 at her daughter’s home in Chicago.

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Indianapolis Star, 22 February 1949.