advertisement

1109 and 1109 1/2 Washington Street.

The one hundred-fifty-fourth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

These little endway houses seem to have begun life as twins. As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, 1109 is “ca. 1935; 1 story; shotgun with side wing” and 1109 1/2 is “ca. 1935; 1 story; brick-veneered and modernized shotgun.”

1109

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 Washington, rented for $13/month, Raymond Tillery, 27, waiter at Carolina General Hospital; wife Louise, 24, cook; and daughter Edna R., 2.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Tillery Raymond (c; Louise; 1) lab h 1109 Washington

In 1942, Raymond Ben Tillery registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 18 March 1913 in Wilson; lived at 1109 East Washington; his contact was Mrs. Raymond Ben Tillery; and he worked at Carolina General Hospital. 

White realtor George A. Barfoot advertised 1109 Washington for sale in 1948, noting that it was a good home for colored people.

Wilson Daily Times, 3 March 1948.

A month later, Barfoot dropped the price a bit and provided a little more detail about the house’s amenities.

Wilson Daily Times, 24 April 1948.

1109 1/2

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 1/2 Washington, rented for $13/month, taxi driver George Vick, 34, born in Wilson, and wife Blanche, 30, tobacco factory stemmer, born in Fayetteville.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Vick Geo (c; Blanch) taxi driver h 1109 1/2 Washington

In 1942, George White Vick registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 9 June 1903 in Wilson; lived at 1109 1/2 Washington; his contact was Mrs. S.H. Vick, 622 East Green; and he worked for Safety Taxi Company.

Photos by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2022.

William Hines and Willie C. Reid merge barber shops.

In January 1932, William Hines announced the merger of his barber shop with Willie C. Reid‘s Wilson Barber Shop. The new business would occupy the space Reid had held at 130 South Goldsboro Street. (The address is the southernmost storefront of the Hackney Building at 124-130 South Goldsboro and is adjacent to today’s Eyes on Main Street gallery.)

Wilson Daily Times, 16 January 1932.

Hines’ former location at 113 South Tarboro was to close at the end of the month, and he announced an immediate reduction in service prices. (A Boncilla massage, by the way, involved a mud mask with Boncilla-brand “clasmic clay” and was touted to resolve wrinkles, lines, blackheads, enlarged pores, and oily skin.

Wilson Daily Times, 18 January 1932.

  • Willie C. Reid

In the 1910 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Jesse Reid, 59; wife Sallie, 53; and children Emmar J., 27, Barnes, 24, Willie, 22, Browdy, 19, Lonely, 17, Effie, 13, and Earle, 10.

In the 1910 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Jesse Reid, 59; wife Sallie, 53; and children Emmar J., 27, Barnes, 24, Willie, 22, Browdy, 19, Lonely, 17, Effie, 13, and Earle, 10.

In 1917, Willie C. Reid registered for the World War I draft in Duplin County, North Carolina. Per his registration card, he was born 28 April 1886 in Fremont, N.C.; lived in Warsaw, N.C.; and worked as a barber for John A. Gaston, Warsaw, N.C. [Gaston was a Wilson County native.]

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: at 407 Vick Street, widow Sallie Reid, 64; sons Willie, 30, barber, Boydie, 20, tailor, and Lonely, 25, tailor, daughter-in-law Mary, 24, schoolteacher, granddaughter Hilter, 3 months, and daughters Effie, 23, and widow Emma E., 35.

On 27 October 1920, Willie Columbus Reid, 31, of Wilson, son of Jesse and Sallie Reid, married Mary E. Galley, 25, of Wilmington, daughter of James J. and Lena E. Galley, at Saint Stephen’s A.M.E. Church in Wilmington, N.C.

In the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Reid William (c) barber The Mayflower h 304 N Vick

In the 1928 and 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Reid Wm C (c; Mary) barber 130 S Goldsboro h 304 N Vick

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 304 Vick, rented for $14/month, Willie C. Reid, 54, native of Fremont, N.C.; wife Mary E., 46, county school teacher and native of Wilmington, N.C.; and children William M., 16, and Helen E., 18.

Willie Columbus Reid died 26 January 1969 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 28 April 1886 to Jessie Reid and Sallie [maiden name not known]; was married to Mary E. Reid; lived at 1106 Atlantic Street; and had worked as a barber.

Clippings courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Our staff is composed of experts; the expense is a matter of your own desire.

“In your home, you should put aside all arguments in favor of the one fact —  the trained and proficient man is the best.” — C.H. Darden & Sons.

Wilson Daily Times, 21 December 1916.

——

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Dr. Elijah L. Reid, the old reliable.

Another ad for veterinarian Elijah L. Reid‘s vaunted wart cure. Reid, who grew up in northwest Wayne County, had settled just across the county line in Moyton, a village adjacent to Stantonsburg.

Wilson Daily Times, 1 October 1897.

Twenty years later, Reid had taken his talents ten miles up the road to Wilson and advertised as “the old reliable Veterinary Surgeon” with an office at his home at Elba and Viola Streets.

Wilson Daily Times, 2 October 1917.

Wilson, N.C., Sanborn fire insurance map, 1913.

Clippings courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.