Food

The colored firemen issue an invitation to feast.

Wilson Daily Times, 30 December 1925.

The Red Hot fire company issued an invitation to Wilson’s leaders to celebrate the New Year. Those who received offers to partake in a barbecue supper included City Fire Department Chief A.L. Lancaster; Herring’s Drug Store proprietor Needham B. Herring and pharmacist Doane Herring; R.J. Grantham, vice-president of Wilson Trust Company and superintendent of the City Water, Light & Gas Department; Roscoe Briggs, president of Citizens Bank, W.W. Simms Company, and Wilson Cotton Mill Company, and vice-president of Wilson Home & Loan Association; R.C. Welfare, president of Welfare Auto Company; clerk of City Police Theo Hinnant; clerk of City Police Court Glaucus Hinnant; Wilson Daily Times editor John D. Gold; and Silas R. Lucas, mayor and City Police Court judge.

Curiously, the invitation noted that “the colored fireman have been 28 years in service helping protect the property of the people of Wilson.” However, as contemporary news articles attest, Black volunteer firefighters were working in Wilson as early as 1887 and were known as the Red Hots as early as 1896.

Colored boys and girls in the corn and canning clubs.

Without comment, on 7 June 1917, the Wilson Daily Times published a lengthy list of names and addresses of children who were members of corn (for boys) and canning (girls) clubs in Wilson, Lucama, and Stantonsburg. The groups, supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, were the precursors to 4-H Clubs.

Given the canning club membership requirements, it’s astonishing that so many town girls were involved. Per Farm Life Readers, Book 5 (Bryan, Evans & Duncan, 1916, page 38): “Any girl between the ages of nine and eighteen in the county, where the work is organized may become a member. She must plant one-tenth of an acre to tomatoes, and must do all the work connected with her garden except preparing the soil for her plants. Prizes are offered for the largest yield, the largest net gain, the best display in glass jars, best history of garden work, the largest tomato, the most perfect tomato, the largest, neatest best collection of tomato recipes.”

Cover of notebook created by North Carolina canning club girl, 1915. Wilson County girls would have been required to create such a document. Jane Simpson McKimmon Papers (PC 234), State of Archives of North Carolina.

Below, the lists of children consolidated and alphabetized:

Lucama

  • Allen, Rose, Route 2
  • Atkinson, Addie, Route 2
  • Atkinson, Mattie, Route 2
  • Barnes, Fletcher, Route 3 Box 68
  • Barnes, Joseph, Route 3 Box 68
  • Barnes, Sarah, Route 3 Box 68
  • Battle, Jason
  • Battle, Mamie
  • Battle, Redmond (son of Columbus and Sallie R. Battle)
  • Bethea, Lillie, Box 77
  • Boykin, Ida, Route 3 Box 76 (daughter of William T. and Sarah Boykin)
  • Boykin, Katie, Route 3 Box 76 (daughter of William T. and Sarah Boykin)
  • Cherry, Eldora, Route 2 (granddaughter of Arch and Martha M. Atkinson)
  • Creech, Daisy, Route 3 Box 74 (daughter of Troy and Martha Creech)
  • Creech, Dorsey, Route 3 Box 74 (son of Troy and Martha Creech)
  • Creech, James, Route 3 Box 14
  • Creech, Naomi, Route 3 Box 14
  • Creech, William, Route 3 Box 14
  • Dew, Joseph, Box 92 (son of Cornelius D. and Cora L. Dew)
  • Dew, Martha, Box 92 (daughter of Cornelius D. and Cora L. Dew)
  • Ellis, Allman, Route 3 Box 14
  • Dupree, Smithie, Route 3 Box 96 (daughter of Moses and Henrietta S. Dupree)
  • Forsythe, Isabella, Route 3
  • Forsythe, Lena, Route 3 (daughter of Mac and Mary Forsythe)
  • Forsythe, William, Route 3
  • Harris, Alvester (son of Andrew J. and Henrietta Harris)
  • Kent, Elijah (son of Rufus and Maggie Kent)
  • Murchison, Johnnie, Route 3 (John J., son of Samuel A. and Martha Murchison)
  • Newsome, Adam, Route 1 (son of Larry and Louetta Artis Newsome)
  • Newsome, Genatus, Route 1 (William Genatus, Larry and Louetta Artis Newsome)
  • Pate, Alvestor, Route 3 Box 75 (son of James G. and Heterow Pate)
  • Pate, Daisy, Route 3 Box 75-A (daughter of James G. and Heterow Pate)
  • Proctor, Bessie, Route 1 Box 15 (daughter of Charlie and Dorita Proctor)
  • Thomas [Thompson], Addie, Box 11 (daughter of Nelson and Melvina Thompson)
  • Thompson, Lillie, Box 11 (daughter of Nelson and Melvina Thompson)
  • Thompson, Nettie, Box 11 (daughter of Nelson and Melvina Thompson)
  • Westley, Mattie (daughter of John A. Wesley)
  • Whitley, Clarence, Route 1 Box 61-B (son of James and India Whitley)
  • Williams, Beatrice, Route 1 Box 95
  • Williams, Essie, Route 3 Box 68
  • Williams, James, Route 1 Box 95
  • Williams, Martha, Route 1 Box 61
  • Williams, Minnie, Route 3 Box 68
  • Williams, Odessa, Route 3 Box __
  • Williamson, Eliza, Route 3 Box 68

Wilson

  • Adkinson, Viola, 649 East Green Street
  • Allen, Lema [Lena], Raleigh Road (daughter of John and Martha Allen)
  • Bagley, Herman, 609 Viola Street (son of Edward and Effie Newsome Bagley)
  • Barefoot, Martha, 103 Viola Street (son of Wiley and Maggie Barefoot)
  • Barnes, Alena, 504 East Green Street
  • Barnes, Alma, Atlanta [Atlantic] Street (daughter of Lemon and Lizzie Barnes)
  • Barnes, Anna, 103 Wiggins Street
  • Barnes, Annie, 211 Manchester Street
  • Barnes, Annie, 213 Pender Street
  • Barnes, Antelia [Artelia], 121 Pender Street (daughter of John M. and Annie Darden Barnes)
  • Barnes, Ardenia, 563 [East] Nash Street (daughter of Jesse and Sarah Barnes Barnes)
  • Barnes, Boisey, 612 East Green Street (son of Dave and Della Hines Barnes)
  • Barnes, Edward, Atlanta [Atlantic] Street (son of Lemon and Lizzie Barnes)
  • Barnes, Frank, 106 East Nash Street
  • Barnes, Gretchen, Nash and Reid Street
  • Barnes, Jessie, 561 East Green Street
  • Barnes, Joseph, 312 Manchester Street
  • Barnes, Lizzie, Route 3 Box 82
  • Barnes, Lucinda, Grabneck
  • Barnes, Mable, 504 East Green Street
  • Barnes, Margaret, Mason Street
  • Barnes, Rosa, 14 Harper Street
  • Barnes, Thelma, Leigh [Lee] Street
  • Barnes, Victoria, Route 1, Box 126
  • Barnes, Wearland, Leigh [Lee] Street (son of William I. and Madie Taylor Barnes)
  • Battle, Annie, 628 East Nash Street
  • Battle, Annie, 135 Sugg Street
  • Battle, Effie, Suggs Street
  • Bess, Suprema, 1105 East Nash Street (granddaughter of Benjamin and Eliza Ellis Best)
  • Best, Laura, West Nash Street (daughter of Noah and Sarah Best)
  • Best, Mattie, 631 East _____
  • Blount, Joseph, Cemetery Street (son of Daniel and Susana Blount)
  • Blount, Walter, 206 Pender Street (son of John and Mary J. Blount)
  • Boykin, Mabel, 700 Viola Street
  • Brannick, Bessie, 139 Ash Street
  • Bullock, Rachel, 412 Lodge Street (daughter of Richard and Lucretia Beal Bullock)
  • Bynum, Agusta, 143 Sugg Street (daughter of Charlie and Sarah Barnes Bynum)
  • Bynum, Cathrin, 541 [East] Nash Street (daughter of Mack and Victoria Bullock Bynum)
  • Bynum, Irene, 140 Suggs Street (daughter of Archibald and Lillie Woodard Bynum)
  • Bynum, Leah, 541 East Nash Street (daughter of Mack and Victoria Bullock Bynum)
  • Cannon, Ethel, 616 East Nash Street (daughter of John and Florence Cannon)
  • Carroll, Mary, 507 Vicks Alley
  • Chapman, Delzelle, 206 Stantonsburg Street
  • Crawford, Willard, 705 Spring Street (son of Joe and Annie Crawford)
  • Cox, Minnie, 109 Green Street (daughter of Floyd and Lula Cox)
  • Dawson, Almedo, 505 East Vance Street
  • Dupree, Nancy, Vick Street (daughter of Wiley and Victoria Woodard Dupree)
  • Edwards, Jonathan, 609 Robinson Street (son of Henry Edwards)
  • Ellis, Charles, 665 Carolina Street
  • Ellis, Florence, 157 Atlanta [Atlantic] Street
  • Ennis, Freeman, 401 Pine Street (son of Samuel and Maggie Barnes Ennis)
  • Farmer, Clara, Mason Street
  • Farmer, Gladys, Barnes Street (daughter of Jason and Bessie Farmer)
  • Faulk, Marie, 210 Pender Street (daughter of Hiram and Arzulia Mitchell Faulk)
  • Gaston, Lorenzo, 120 Manchester Street
  • Grantham, John E., 205 Reid Street
  • Green, Ida, 628 Green Street
  • Green, William, 1208 Pender Street
  • Griffis, Hazel, Vick Street
  • Hall, Flora, 607 Sunshine Street
  • Hargreaves, Willie, 663 East Carolina Street
  • Harper, Mary, 141 _____
  • Harris, Georgia, 617 Stantonsburg Street
  • Haskins, Estelle, 505 West _____
  • Haskins, Mandy, 303 Varn [Barnes] Street
  • Haskins, Marie, 631 East Green Street
  • Holden, Carrie, 305 John Street
  • Holman, Thelma, 503 East Vance Street
  • Holt, Maggie, 113 Pender Street
  • Hooper, Ruther, 656 Viola Street
  • Howard, Mary, 110 Pender Street
  • Howard, Ophelia, 627 East Green Street
  • Hunt, Lulu, County Road
  • [H]ussey, Rhoda, 634 [East] Nash Street
  • Jackson, Joseph, 619 East Green Street (son of Joseph and Annie Horton Jackson)
  • Jackson, Paul, 619 East Green Street (son of Joseph and Annie Horton Jackson)
  • Jeffreys, Luvinia, 702 Daniel Street
  • Johnson, Maizie Lee, 151 Sugg Street
  • Johnson, Winona, 418 East Nash Street
  • Jones, Alice, 825 Stantonsburg Street (daughter of Wesley and Martha Taylor Jones)
  • Jones, Margaret, 400 Washington Street
  • Jones, Julia, 700 Tarboro Street
  • Kittrell, Rosalie, 637 East Green Street
  • Lane, Archer, 7084 Green Street
  • Lane, Esther, 704 East Green Street
  • Langley, Harriet, 800 Viola Street
  • Lewis, John, 411 Vick Street
  • Lonze, Willis, 619 Vance Street
  • Lude, Martha, 119 Pender Street
  • Marshall, Inez, 315 Jones Street
  • McCoy, Henry, 23 Carolina Street
  • McPhail, Mary, 313 Vick Street
  • Melton, Maggie, 648 Mercer Street
  • Miller, Rebecca, 313 Goldsboro Street
  • Mimms, ___sie, Grabneck Street
  • Mitchell, Lester, 549 East Green Street
  • Moore, Samuel, 406 Wiggins Street
  • Morgan, Ella, 706 Green Street
  • Myselle, Mary, 307 Walnut Street
  • Norfleet, Ruth, 213 Lee Street
  • Norwood, Eliza, Route 4, Box 14-A
  • Oates, Rosa, 542 Narrow Way Street
  • [O’]Kelley, Gladys, 633 East Green Street
  • Palmer, Beatrice, 608 Viola Street
  • Parker, Maggie, 111 Ash Street
  • Parker, Marie, 901 _____
  • Pearce, Almira, 806 East Vance Street
  • Pitt, Elizabeth, 804 East Vance Street
  • Pur___, Alma, 413 Stantonsburg Street
  • Reed, Bruce, 601 East Green Street (son of J.D. and Eleanor Frederick Reid)
  • Rodgers, Alphonza, 607 Lodge Street
  • Sanders, Amelia, 143 East Street
  • Savage, Bedford, 623 Darehis [Dardens] Alley (daughter of Frank and Serena Woodard Savage)
  • Scarborough, Lucile, 1109 East Nash Street (daughter of Festus and Mary Parker Scarborough)
  • Scott, Mary, near Colored Gra. School
  • Scott, Sarah, Woodard Avenue
  • Selman, Francis, West Hines Street
  • Shaw, Willie, 209 Hackney Street
  • Simms, Essie, 509 Mercey [Mercer] Street
  • Speight, Bessie, 627 East Green Street (daughter of Jake and Rebecca Speight)
  • Spells, John, 133 Pender Street (son of John S. and Martha A. Gordon Spell)
  • Stephen, Elsie, 151 Lee Street
  • Stevens, Josephine, Lodge Street
  • Taylor, Gladys, Robinson [Robeson] and Reid Streets
  • Taylor, Mae, 9_6 Carolina Street
  • Taylor, Tilly, 515 East Green Street
  • Thigpen, Amanda, 603 East Elba Street
  • Thomas, Marie, 616 East Green Street (daughter of Charles and Sarah Best Thomas)
  • Utley, George, 39 East Green Street
  • Vick, George, 623 East Green Street (son of Samuel H. and Annie Washington Vick)
  • Washington, _____, 630 East Green Street (child of George and Cora Miller Washington)
  • Washington, James, 630 East Green Street (son of George and Cora Miller Washington)
  • Weeks, Marie, 131 Pender Street (daughter of Rev. Alfred and Annie E. Weeks)
  • White, Patsy, Grabneck Street
  • Wilkins, Hattie, 414 East Lodge Street (daughter of Redden S. and Mary Hines Wilkins)
  • Williams, Dorthea, Rountree Street
  • Williams, Helen, 411 [South] Goldsboro Street
  • Williams, Mattie, 204 Wiggins Street
  • Williams, Nettie, Stantonsburg Road
  • Woodard, Almira, 119 Ash Street
  • Woodard, Herbert, 22 Harper Street

Stantonsburg

  • Applewhite, Alberta
  • Applewhite, Cherry (daughter of George and Jane Edmundson Applewhite)
  • Artis, Estelle
  • Artis, Nora
  • Barnes, Bessie
  • Barnes, Cora
  • Barnes, Hattie
  • Barnes, James
  • Batts, Ada
  • Foster, Mamie
  • Hagans, Luvinia (daughter of Dave and Almeta Ellis Hagans)
  • Hall, Oliver (son of James and Henrietta Hall)
  • Jones, Agnes
  • Jones, Albert
  • Jones, Ernest
  • Jones, Roscoe
  • Locus, Naomi
  • Lucus, Emma
  • Miller, Sarah
  • Newsome, Valdena
  • Reid, Loumiza (daughter of William and Bettie Wilson Reid)
  • Ward, James
  • Ward, Sarah
  • Whitley, Beatrice (daughter of Titus and Ida Whitley)
  • Whitley, Benjamin (son of Titus and Ida Whitley)
  • Winstead, Isaac (son of James Woodard and Annie Liza Winstead)
  • Winstead, Camuel [Samuel?]
  • Winstead, Mena (daughter of Mandy Winstead)
  • Yelverton, Ada (daughter of Ivory and Annie Taylor Yelverton)
  • Yelverton, Albert
  • Yelverton, Claude (son of Ivory and Annie Taylor Yelverton)
  • Yelverton, Henry (son of Ivory and Annie Taylor Yelverton)

Bazaar to benefit the hospital.

Wilson Daily Times, 7 December 1916.

A few years after it opened, friends of the Wilson Colored Hospital (later known as Mercy) held a pop-up shop of sorts in the Odd Fellows Hall on East Nash Street to raise money for indigent tuberculosis patients. On offer, clothing, but mostly undoubtedly delicious food — barbecue, chicken salad, oysters, sausages, sandwiches, sweets and ice cream.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Though I disavow the false narrative that has been passed down to us about the first Thanksgiving, I embrace the setting aside of a day to give thanks. In these times more than ever, I’m grateful for the overwhelming bounty of my life. In all my years, I have never wanted for family, health, shelter, or wealth, and I understand the privilege that bestows upon me. Black Wide-Awake and Lane Street Project are ways I honor the people and place that nourished and encouraged and shaped me. 

Five-foot collard.

Wilson Daily Times, 16 July 1932.

Cabbage collards are an heirloom variety of collards that originated in eastern North Carolina. Yellow-tinged and more tender than regular collards, they are also less bitter. (In other words, they are delicious.)

——

Probably, in the 1880 census of Lumber Bridge township, Robeson County: Ed Currie, 22; wife Effie, 19; and stepson Mac, 10.

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Plank Road, farmer Ed Curry, 50; wife Caroline, 23; and sons Clarence, 17, Joe, 12, and Jim, 8.

On 12 February 1925, Ed Curry, 60, married Alice Woodard, 30, in Wilson.

In the 1930 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Eddie Curry, 75; wife Alice, 43; and sons Alex, 12, Willie, 16, and James, 11.

Edward Curry died 21 December 1937 in Saratoga township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 82 years old; was born in Robeson County, N.C., to Jack Curry and Sarah Baldwin; was married to Alice Curry; and was a farmer.

Joe Curry died 18 May 1948 in Snow Hill, Greene County, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was about 50 years old; was born in Florence, South Carolina, to Ed Curry and Caroline Curry, both of Wilson County; worked as a machinist for county schools; was married to Addie Edwards [Curry]; and was buried in Rountree Cemetery, Wilson.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Health Department ratings.

Wilson Daily Times, 14 July 1922.

The (county?) health department rated five “colored” cafes during a monthly inspection in July 1922.

Tate’s Cafe, as drawn in the 1922 Sanborn fire insurance maps of Wilson.

  • Central Cafe — per the 1922 city directory, this eatery was located at 415 East Nash Street and had a Greek (or Greek-American) proprietor, Mike Vekrakos.

Central Cafe, as drawn in the 1922 Sanborn fire insurance maps of Wilson.

  • Gilliams Cafe — per the 1922 city directory, this cafe was located at 509 East Nash Street, and Rachel Gilliam was proprietor. Gilliam lived at 228 Smith Street, the narrow lane running parallel to Nash.
  • Carolina Cafe
  • Barnes Cafe

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Family ties, no. 1: a shoebox full of food.

Wilson’s emergence as a leading tobacco market town drew hundreds of African-American migrants in the decades after the 1890s. Many left family behind in their home counties, perhaps never to be seen again. Others maintained ties the best way they could.

Sarah Henderson Jacobs Silver and her husband Jesse A. Jacobs Jr. left Dudley, in southern Wayne County, North Carolina, around 1905. They came to Wilson presumably for better opportunities off the farm. Each remained firmly linked, however, to parents and children and siblings back in Wayne County as well as in the Great Migration north. This post is the first in a series of excerpts from interviews with Hattie Henderson Ricks, their adoptive daughter (and Sarah’s great-niece), revealing the ways her Wilson family stayed connected to their far-flung kin. (Or didn’t.)

——

Sarah Henderson Jacobs Silver, born in 1872, was the eighth of nine children. By time she moved to Wilson, only her brothers James Lucian Henderson, born 1859, and Caswell C. Henderson, born 1865, were living. (Hattie was her sister Loudie Henderson’s grandchild.) Caswell had migrated to New York City by about 1890, but Lucian remained in Dudley to farm. He and his wife, Susan McCollum Henderson, had only one child, who died in early adulthood without a spouse or children.

Susie Henderson had long been sickly and, by the late 1920s, Lucian Henderson’s health had begun to fail. Jesse Jacobs’ nephew, John Wesley Carter, lived nearby. He had developed a close relation with the Hendersons, but could not be expected to assume complete responsibility for their care.

The family turned to the Atlantic Coast Line Rail Road for a solution:

“Mama Sarah [would] fix dinner and send it down to Dudley on the train. The man that run the whatchacallit — engine?  Up there, where stokes the fire or whatever is on the train. He would take it.  But she would tell what day she was gon send it. And so somebody’d be up there to the train station to get it.  And the train, ‘cause a lot of time the train didn’t stop in Dudley. But anyway, the man, the conductor, he would pull the thing, whatever, for the train to stop long enough for him to drop off this package.  … Somebody she’d have be out there when the train come through, and then the porter on the train — Mama knew him —  and so then Johnnie and them or somebody be out there to take the package. It’d be a shoebox full of food, already cooked and ready to eat. So that’s the way they helped Uncle Lucian and A’nt Susie, like that. Until they died, and so that was the end of trying to feed them and take care of them.”

Look closely at this snippet of a 1936 map of the Atlantic Coast Line’s routes. Wilson is just above the center point. Lucian and Susie Henderson’s care packages traveled south through Goldsboro to the whistle stop at Dudley’s platform, nine miles below and just above Mount Olive.

Adapted from interviews of Hattie H. Ricks by Lisa Y. Henderson, 1996 and 1998. All rights reserved. 

Drapped the wrong one.

Casual violence among young men is not new. Unsurprisingly, historically newspapers have sensationalized such violence when it involved black men, playing into the stereotypes and fear-mongering of the era.

I recognize the viciousness of this propaganda.* I also recognize articles reporting violent crime as invaluable, if distorted, glimpses into the lives of ordinary African-Americans during a period in which they were poorly documented. Beyond the basic facts of the terrible crime reported here, what can we learn?

News and Observer (Raleigh, N.C.), 30 July 1907.

  • “on the Owens place” — This reference to the owner of the farm on which the events took place indicates the protagonists were likely sharecroppers or tenant farmers. The Saratoga Road is today’s U.S. Highway 264-A (formerly N.C. Highway 91.)
  • “a negro dance and barbecue supper was given by Robert Hilliard” — Hilliard, who was Black, hosted a Saturday night party on the farm, perhaps in a barn. He sold barbecue — surely Eastern North Carolina-style, with a vinegar-and-red pepper sauce — and sandwiches to patrons from a stand near the road.
  • “a wheezy fiddle” — the source of music for the dance. (Who was the fiddler? Was he locally renowned? Was there accompaniment? Was fiddling a common skill? I can’t name a single one from this era.)
  • “‘Hilliard is the n*gger I wanted to drap.” — The meaning and usage of this now-extreme pejorative has shifted over time. Here, it is almost, but not quite, neutral. More interesting, to me, is the now-archaic pronunciation “drap” for the  verb “drop.”

——

  • Will Scarborough 

On 29 January 1903, Will Scarborough, 21, of Saratoga, son of Ashley and Ellen Scarborough, married Lucy Anderson, 18, of Wilson, daughter of Bob and Winnie Anderson, in Wilson County. Jack Bynum applied for the license.

Will Scarborough died 6 August 1968 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 90 years old; was the son of Ashley Scarborough and Ellen [maiden name unknown]; was a widower; lived in Stantonsburg; and was buried at Saint Delight cemetery, Walstonburg. Informant was James E. Best, Stantonsburg.

  • Robert Hilliard

On 1 November 1900, Robert Hilliard, 20, of Wilson County, son of Jack and Laura Hilliard, married Ailsy Bynum, 19, of Wilson County, daughter of West and Sopha Bynum, in Gardners township, Wilson County.

Robert George Hilliard Sr. died 27 February 1944 at his home at 211 Finch Street, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 66 years old; was born in Wilson County to Jack Hilliard and Laura [maiden name unknown]; was a widower; was engaged in farming; and was buried in Rountree cemetery. Mattie Moore, 211 Finch Street, was informant.

  • Riley Faison  

On 8 May 1902, Riley Faison, 30, of Wilson County, son of Henry and Sophia Faison, married Frances Farmer, 26, of Wilson County, daughter of Tom and Polly Farmer, at “Mr. Frank Barnes Plantation.” A.M.E. Zion elder N.L. Overton performed the ceremony in the presence of Mattie V. Overton, James Smith, and Polly Farmer.

——

*See Brent Staples’ opinion piece in the 11 July 2021 New York Times, “How the White Press Wrote Off Black America.”

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Seeking barbecue photos.

Marion Post Wolcott image of man and two women rendering fat after a hog killing, near Maxton, N.C., 1938. Library of Congress. (Not Wilson County, but this scene would have been familiar.)

Time to dig in those old scrapbooks. Black Wide-Awake is collaborating on a major research project, and we need your help! We are looking for African-American family photos of Wilson County pig pickings, whole hog barbecues, cookouts, and farm life. If you are interested in sharing your family photos for an amazing project that will celebrate the foodways, traditions, and legacy of Wilson, North Carolina, please contact Zella Palmer at zpalmer@dillard.edu. or Lisa Y. Henderson at blackwideawake@gmail.com.

 Photo of Parker’s Barbecue pit worker courtesy of “The Barbecue Bus: Parker’s Barbecue, Wilson, N.C.” (2011).