Joyner

Henry Joyner, whose credit is good.

Wilson Daily Times, 24 September 1929.

——

In the 1880 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farmer Simon Joyner, 38; wife Venus, 36; and children Mary A.F., 14, William H., 11, Dossy, 9, Jacen, 7, and Charley, 2.

On 5 January 1895, Henry Joyner, 26, of Taylors township, son of Simon and Venus Winstead, married Margaret Winstead, 27, of Taylors township, daughter of Berry and Luenda Winstead, in Taylors township.

In the 1900 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farmer Henry Jones, 31; wife Margret, 31; and children James, 14, Lou, 10, William H., 6, Herbert, 4, Maggie, 3, and Anna, 1 month.

In the 1910 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: on Thompson Road, farmer Henry Joyner, 42; wife Margaret, 42; and children Lula, 18, William, 17, Hubbert, 15, Maggie, 13, Annie, 10, Obie, 8, Bettie, 4, Luther, 2, Theodore, 3 months, and James, 24.

In the 1920 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farmer Henry Joyner, 52; wife Margaret, 51; and children Annie, 20, Obie, 18, Bettie, 13, Luther, 11, Theodore, 9, and Lizzie, 6; and grandson Nathan, 6 months.

In the 1930 census of Jackson township, Nash County, North Carolina: farmer Henry Joyner, 60; wife Margaret, 60; children Anne, 26, Obie, 25, Bettie, 24, Luther, 21, Lizzie, 16, and Nathan, 10; and grandchildren Josephine, 14, Rosella, 12, Edward, 10, and Elmus Eatmon, 8.

In the 1940 census of Jackson township, Nash County: Obie Joyner, 38; wife Gladys, 20; father Henry Joyner, 71; mother Margret Joyner, 70; sister Annie, 40; brother Luther, 30; nephew Curtis, 7; niece Leona Eatmon, 28; nephew Nathan Eatmon, 28; and lodger Elmus Eatmon, 19.

Henry Joyner died 13 June 1944 in Jackson township, Nash County. Per his death certificate, he was 78 years old; was born in Wilson County to Simon and Venus Joyner of Wilson County; was a farmer; was married to Margaret Joyner; and was buried in Granite Point cemetery, Wilson County. Obie Joyner was informant.

Margaret Joyner died 18 October 1944 in Jackson township, Nash County. Per her death certificate, she was 77 years old; was a widow; was born in Nash County to Berry and Lurenda Winstead of Nash County; and was buried in Granite Point cemetery, Wilson County. Obie Joyner was informant.

Thanks to J. Robert Boykin III for the clipping.

What Joyner saw.

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Wilson Daily Times, 17 October 1911. 

George Washington Joyner came forth with information after William Langley, a seven year-old white boy, was struck in the head by a bottle at Wilson’s carnival ground. The Times was careful to assure its readers that it “gladly published” a black man’s identification of the culprit “on account of the statement that a negro man threw the bottle.” (The witness Joyner named, Ed. Barnes, was almost certainly black, as well.) Note, however, the headline: “Saw a White Boy Strike Langley.”

Henry and Annie Conner Joyner of Indianapolis, Indiana.

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Indianapolis News, 17 February 1940.

On 26 May 1886, Henry Joyner, 30, married Annie Conner, 20, in Wilson. A.M.E. Zion minister J.N. Rasberry. Witnesses were S.H. Vick, E.C. Simms and H. Haywood.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 949 King Avenue, laborer Henry Joyner, 49; wife Annie, 39; and children Edwin, 13, Stella, 11, Lama, 9, George, 7, Thomas, 4, and Cora, 2; plus boarder Bennet Beachem, 71.

In the 1902 Indianapolis city directory: Joyner Henry, lab, h 1011 N Tremont av

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 1117 Tremont Street, Henry Joyner, 55, laborer; wife Annie, 44; and children Edwin, 23, Lama, 18, George, 16, Thomas, 14, Cora, 11, Cecil, 9, and Henry, 7.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 1117 Tremont Street, Henry Joyner, 60, railroad car cleaner; wife Annie, 50; and children Lama, 28, seamstress for garment cleaner, George, 26, and Thomas, 24, both foundry core pasters.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 2858 Highland Park, rented for $25/month, steam railway laborer Henry Joyner, 73, born in North Carolina; wife Annie, 65, born in North Carolina; son George E., 36, building construction laborer; and grandchildren Harry Booker, 10, and Chas. R. Joyner, 7.

Henry Joyner died 11 February 1940 at his home at 2858 Highland Place, Indianapolis. Per her death certificate, he was born 15 October 1861 in Wilson, N.C., to unknown parents; was married to Annie P. Joyner; and was buried at Crown Hill.

Annie P. Conner Joyner died February 1949 at her daughter’s home in Chicago.

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Indianapolis Star, 22 February 1949.

1310 East Nash Street.

The one hundred-sixth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; James Joyner House; bungalow with gable roof, brick veneer, engaged porch; Joyner was an auto mechanic who owned a shot next door; builder was Nestus Freeman.”

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: James Joyner, 30, garage mechanic, and wife Annie, 28.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: James Joyner, 40, laborer, and wife Annie, 40, tobacco factory stemmer.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Joyner Jas J (Annie) auto repr 1310 E Nash h [ditto]

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Joyner Jas J (Lillian) h 1310 E Nash

——

As of the date of this posting, this property is listed for sale online by multiple real estate database companies. The listings provide 21 photos of the interior and exterior of the house, including these, which reveal the attention paid to detail and aesthetics in even working-class homes built in this era.

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Adjoining rooms with corner fireplaces share the two chimneys. The surround is brick and is topped with a shallow wooden mantel. Also, notice the subtle flare of the trim atop the doorframes.

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Bricked-in firebox with former stovepipe attachment point visible. Contrast the fireplace and mantel surround with that above.

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Five-panel doors; two-and-a-quarter-inch oak flooring.

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Oversized four-over-over windows. Same flared edge on trim at the headers.

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Center hall staircase.

 

 

The obituaries of Anna Brodie and Margaret Joyner.

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Wilson Daily Times, 20 October 1944.

  • Anna Brodie — Anna Kearney Brodie.

In the 1900 census of Franklinton, Franklin County: Paul Kearney, 59; wife Patsey, 47; and children Robert, 19, Bennie, 16, Anna, 13, Zollie, 11, Joseph, 9, Geneva, 5, and Vassa L., 2.

In the 1910 census of Youngsville, Franklin County: Paul Kearney, 67; wife Patsy P., 54; and children Anna, 23, Zollie, 21, Joseph, 19, Geneva, 15, and Vassar, 10.

On or about 30 December 1913, Arthur Brodie, 26, of Franklin County, son of Joshua and Nellie Brodie, married Anna Kearney, 26, of Franklin County, daughter of Paul and Patsie Kearnie, in Franklinton, North Carolina.

In 1918, Arthur Brodie registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 7 May 1886; resided at 16 Carolina Street; worked as a machine operator for Hackney Wagon Company; and his nearest relative was Anna Brodie.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: laborer Aurtha Brodie, 36; wife Annie, 31; children Lizzie V., 3, and Aurtha, 2; and brother Elmer, 22.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1201 Carolina Street, rented for $12/month, tobacco factory laborer Arthur Broady, 43; wife Anna, 46, laundry; and children Elizabeth, 13, Arthur, 11, Iola, 8, May E., 5, and Anna O., 11 months.

On 17 April 1937, Elizabeth Brodie, 20, of Wilson, daughter of Arthur and Anna Brodie, married Luther E. McKeithan, 25, son of Henry and Sarah McKeithan of Cumberland County, in Wilson. A.M.E. minister John C. Coaxum performed the ceremony in the presence of Rhoda McMillan, Alex McMillan and Sallie Suggs.

In 1940, Arthur Brodie Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 9 September 1918 in Wilson; lived at 1208 Queen Street; his contact was mother Anna Kernay Brodie; and he worked at Carolina Laundry.

On 9 March 1941, Iola Brodie, 20, of Raleigh, daughter of Arthur and Anna Brodie of Wilson, married Willie Blount, 21, of Raleigh, son of Mary Rawlins, in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Annie Brodie died 18 October 1944 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 57 years old; her birthday was July 1; she was married to Arthur Brodie; she lived at 1208 Queen Street; and she was born in Franklinton, North Carolina, to Paul Kearney and Patsy Perry.

On 26 September 1946, Anna Odell Brodie, 17, of Raleigh, daughter of Arthur and Anna Brodie of Wilson, married Jack Terry Marsh, 17, of Raleigh, son of William and Joy Bell Marsh, in Raleigh. Iola Blount, guardian, gave permission for Anna to marry.

  • Seventh Day Adventist Church
  • Elder N.B. Smith — Napoleon B. Smith. Rev. Smith is listed in the 1922, 1925 and 1930 Wilson city directories.
  • Margaret Joyner — Margaret Winstead Joyner.

In the 1870 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Benj. M. Williams, 35; Berry Winstead, 47; his wife Louisa, 41; and their children Adeline, 20, Lena, 18, Sidney, 13, Rinah, 7, Henry, 10, Malinah, 6, Willie, 1, and Margrett, 4.

Henry Joyner, 26, of Taylors township, son of Simon and Venus Joyner, married Margaret Winstead, 26, of Taylors township, daughter of Berry and Luende Winstead, at A.M. Thompson’s house in Taylors.

In the 1900 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Henry Joyner, 32; wife Margret, 31; and children James, 14, Lou, 10, William H., 7, Hubert, 4, Maggie, 3, and Anna, 9 months.

In the 1910 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: on Thompson’s Road, Henry Joyner, 42; wife Margaret, 42; and children Lula, 18, William, 17, Hubbert, 15, Maggie, 13, Annie, 10, Obie, 8, Bettie, 4, Luther, 2, and Theodore, 3 months, and James Joyner, 24.

In the 1920 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: Henry Joyner, 52; wife Margaret, 51; and children Annie, 20, Obie, 18, Bettie, 13, Luther, 11, Theodore, 9, and Lizzie, 6, and grandson Nathan, 6 months.

Maggie Eatmon died 10 February 1923 in Jackson township, Nash County. Per her death certificate, she was 26 years old; was born in Wilson County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead of Nash County; was engaged in farming; was married to Sessoms Eatmon; and was buried in Wilson County.

In the 1930 census of Jackson township, Nash County: Henry Joyner, 60; wife Margaret, 60; and children Annie, 26, Obie, 25, Bettie, 24, Luther, 21, and Lizzie, 16, and grandchildren Nathan Joyner, 8, and Josephine, 14, Rosella, 12, Edward, 10, and Elmus Eatmon, 8.

Bettie Joyner died 17 September 1933 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 25 years old; was born in Wilson County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead; was married to Fred Joyner; and engaged in farming.

In the 1940 census of Jackson township, Nash County: Obie Joyner, 38; wife Gladys, 20; father Henry, 71; mother Margrett, 70; siblings Annie, 40, and Luther, 31; and nieces and nephews Curtis Joyner, 7, and Leone, 4, Nathan, 24, and Elmus Eatmon, 19.

Henry Joyner died 13 June 1944 in Jackson township, Nash County. Per his death certificate, he was 78 years old; was born in Wilson County to Simon and Venus Joyner; was married to Margaret Joyner; was a farmer; and was buried in Granite Point cemetery, Wilson County.

Margaret Joyner died 18 October 1944 in Nash County. Per her death certificate, she was 77 years old; was born in Nash County to Berry Winstead and Lurenda Winstead; was a widow; and was buried in Granite Point cemetery, Wilson County. Obie Joyner was informant.

Annie Joyner Thomas died 30 October 1950 in Rocky Mount, Nash County. Per her death certificate, she was born 2 April 1900 in Wilson County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead; resided in Elm City; was married to John Thomas; and was buried in the Thomas family cemetery in Wilson County.

Herbert Joyner died 14 August 1966 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 January 1893 in Wilson County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead; was married to Laura Joyner; resided in Wilson; was a World War I veteran; and worked as a laborer.

Lula Joyner Eatmon died 25 January 1967 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 12 May 1894 in Nash County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead; was married to Jarman Eatmon; and resided in Elm City.

  • Saint Paul’s Holiness Church — now Saint Paul Church of Christ, located on Lake Wilson Road northwest of Wilson?
  • Rev. Benny Melton — in the 1940 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Bennie Melton, 33; wife Julia, 34; children Ireen, 6, Kathreen, 4, Curtis, 3, Bennie Jr., 2, and Esther, 8 months; grandson Ramson Morgan, 4; and mother Frances Morgan, 57.

609 Viola Street.

The seventy-second in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1908; L-plan cottage with especially intact bracketed porch; asbestos shingled.”

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Viola Street, Wash Joyner, 35, house painter; wife Sarah, 32, laundress; and son Alexander, 13.

In 1917, Alexander Barnes Joyner registered for the World War I draft in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, his address was 616 Viola Street, and worked as a chair pusher for the Shill Company in Atlantic City. [Under the pre-1922 numbering system, 609 Viola was 616.]

In 1918, George Washington Joyner registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 15 April 1875; resided at 616 Viola Street; was a self-employed barber at 213 Goldsboro Street, Wilson; and his nearest relative was Sarah Jane Joyner, 616 Viola.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: public laborer Sarah Joyner, 45, widow, and son Elex, 22.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 609 Viola, owned and valued at $2000, maid Sarah Joyner, 40, widow.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Joyner Sarah (c) lndrs h 609 Viola

Sarah Joyner died 5 May 1943 at her home at 609 East Viola Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 66 years old; was born in Wilson County to Alex Barnes and Frances Stephens, both of Wilson County; was the widow of J. Washington Joyner; and was buried in Rountree cemetery. Informant was Annie Alexander of the home.

Photograph taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2017.

1922 Sanborn fire insurance map of Wilson, N.C. (The private school was, of course, the Independent School.)

I will get all the subscribers I can.

New York Age, 14 January 1915.

——

In the 1908 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, painter, h 616 Viola.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: wagon factory laborer Willie Paulkin, 26, wife Pearl, 22, son Atric, 2, and brother Sam, 24, a wagon factory laborer; also house painter Wash Joyner, 35, wife Sarah, 32, a laundress, and son Alexander, 13.

In the 1912 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, barber, h 616 Viola.

In 1918, George Washington Joyner registered for the World War I draft. Per his registration card, he was born 15 April 1875; resided at 616 Viola Street; was a self-employed barber at 213 Goldsboro Street; and his nearest relative was Sarah Jane Joyner.

Lincoln U. students.

From the Catalogue of Lincoln University 1920-’21:

Sophomore class

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In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: wagon factory laborer Willie Paulkin, 26, wife Pearl, 22, son Atric, 2, and brother Sam, 24, also a wagon factory laborer; plus Wash Joyner, 35, house painter, wife Sarah, 32, laundress, and son Alexander, 13.

In 1917, Alexander B. Joyner registered for the World War I draft in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 616 Viola Street, Wilson; was single; and worked as a chair pusher for Shill Company in Atlantic City. He was described as medium height and build.

Alexander Barnes Joyner registered for the World War II draft in New York, New York, in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 249 West 139th Street, New York; his contact was “George Joyner (wife),” and he worked for the W.P.A., 70 Columbus Avenue, New York.

Freshman class

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: postmaster Samuel H. Vick, 37; wife Annie M., 28; and children Elba L., 17, and Daniel L., 3; plus cousin Bessie Parker, 15.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: dealer in real estate Samuel Vick, 47; wife Annie, 38; and children Elma, 17, Daniel L., 13, Samuel E., 10, George, 7, Anna, 5, and Robert, 2.

In 1918, Daniel Leon Vick registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1897 in Wilson; resided at 623 Green Street; his father was born in Nash County, North Carolina; he worked for S.H. Vick; and S.H. Vick was his nearest relative. He was described as short and medium build.

In the 1920 census of Washington, D.C.: at 1455 W Street N.W., North Carolina-born Daniel Vick, 22, boarded in the household of Charles L. Jones. He worked as an office building messenger.

Daniel L. Vick registered for the World War II draft in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1898 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 125 North 58th Street, Philadelphia; his contact was Mrs. Annie M. Vick, 622 East Green Street, Wilson; and he worked for John Wilds, 4035 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.