Joyner

The obituaries of Anna Brodie and Margaret Joyner.

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Wilson Daily Times, 20 October 1944.

  • Anna Brodie — Anna Kearney Brodie.

In the 1900 census of Franklinton, Franklin County: Paul Kearney, 59; wife Patsey, 47; and children Robert, 19, Bennie, 16, Anna, 13, Zollie, 11, Joseph, 9, Geneva, 5, and Vassa L., 2.

In the 1910 census of Youngsville, Franklin County: Paul Kearney, 67; wife Patsy P., 54; and children Anna, 23, Zollie, 21, Joseph, 19, Geneva, 15, and Vassar, 10.

On or about 30 December 1913, Arthur Brodie, 26, of Franklin County, son of Joshua and Nellie Brodie, married Anna Kearney, 26, of Franklin County, daughter of Paul and Patsie Kearnie, in Franklinton, North Carolina.

In 1918, Arthur Brodie registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 7 May 1886; resided at 16 Carolina Street; worked as a machine operator for Hackney Wagon Company; and his nearest relative was Anna Brodie.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: laborer Aurtha Brodie, 36; wife Annie, 31; children Lizzie V., 3, and Aurtha, 2; and brother Elmer, 22.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1201 Carolina Street, rented for $12/month, tobacco factory laborer Arthur Broady, 43; wife Anna, 46, laundry; and children Elizabeth, 13, Arthur, 11, Iola, 8, May E., 5, and Anna O., 11 months.

On 17 April 1937, Elizabeth Brodie, 20, of Wilson, daughter of Arthur and Anna Brodie, married Luther E. McKeithan, 25, son of Henry and Sarah McKeithan of Cumberland County, in Wilson. A.M.E. minister John C. Coaxum performed the ceremony in the presence of Rhoda McMillan, Alex McMillan and Sallie Suggs.

In 1940, Arthur Brodie Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 9 September 1918 in Wilson; lived at 1208 Queen Street; his contact was mother Anna Kernay Brodie; and he worked at Carolina Laundry.

On 9 March 1941, Iola Brodie, 20, of Raleigh, daughter of Arthur and Anna Brodie of Wilson, married Willie Blount, 21, of Raleigh, son of Mary Rawlins, in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Annie Brodie died 18 October 1944 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 57 years old; her birthday was July 1; she was married to Arthur Brodie; she lived at 1208 Queen Street; and she was born in Franklinton, North Carolina, to Paul Kearney and Patsy Perry.

On 26 September 1946, Anna Odell Brodie, 17, of Raleigh, daughter of Arthur and Anna Brodie of Wilson, married Jack Terry Marsh, 17, of Raleigh, son of William and Joy Bell Marsh, in Raleigh. Iola Blount, guardian, gave permission for Anna to marry.

  • Seventh Day Adventist Church
  • Elder N.B. Smith — Napoleon B. Smith. Rev. Smith is listed in the 1922, 1925 and 1930 Wilson city directories.
  • Margaret Joyner — Margaret Winstead Joyner.

In the 1870 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Benj. M. Williams, 35; Berry Winstead, 47; his wife Louisa, 41; and their children Adeline, 20, Lena, 18, Sidney, 13, Rinah, 7, Henry, 10, Malinah, 6, Willie, 1, and Margrett, 4.

Henry Joyner, 26, of Taylors township, son of Simon and Venus Joyner, married Margaret Winstead, 26, of Taylors township, daughter of Berry and Luende Winstead, at A.M. Thompson’s house in Taylors.

In the 1900 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Henry Joyner, 32; wife Margret, 31; and children James, 14, Lou, 10, William H., 7, Hubert, 4, Maggie, 3, and Anna, 9 months.

In the 1910 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: on Thompson’s Road, Henry Joyner, 42; wife Margaret, 42; and children Lula, 18, William, 17, Hubbert, 15, Maggie, 13, Annie, 10, Obie, 8, Bettie, 4, Luther, 2, and Theodore, 3 months, and James Joyner, 24.

In the 1920 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: Henry Joyner, 52; wife Margaret, 51; and children Annie, 20, Obie, 18, Bettie, 13, Luther, 11, Theodore, 9, and Lizzie, 6, and grandson Nathan, 6 months.

Maggie Eatmon died 10 February 1923 in Jackson township, Nash County. Per her death certificate, she was 26 years old; was born in Wilson County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead of Nash County; was engaged in farming; was married to Sessoms Eatmon; and was buried in Wilson County.

In the 1930 census of Jackson township, Nash County: Henry Joyner, 60; wife Margaret, 60; and children Annie, 26, Obie, 25, Bettie, 24, Luther, 21, and Lizzie, 16, and grandchildren Nathan Joyner, 8, and Josephine, 14, Rosella, 12, Edward, 10, and Elmus Eatmon, 8.

Bettie Joyner died 17 September 1933 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 25 years old; was born in Wilson County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead; was married to Fred Joyner; and engaged in farming.

In the 1940 census of Jackson township, Nash County: Obie Joyner, 38; wife Gladys, 20; father Henry, 71; mother Margrett, 70; siblings Annie, 40, and Luther, 31; and nieces and nephews Curtis Joyner, 7, and Leone, 4, Nathan, 24, and Elmus Eatmon, 19.

Henry Joyner died 13 June 1944 in Jackson township, Nash County. Per his death certificate, he was 78 years old; was born in Wilson County to Simon and Venus Joyner; was married to Margaret Joyner; was a farmer; and was buried in Granite Point cemetery, Wilson County.

Margaret Joyner died 18 October 1944 in Nash County. Per her death certificate, she was 77 years old; was born in Nash County to Berry Winstead and Lurenda Winstead; was a widow; and was buried in Granite Point cemetery, Wilson County. Obie Joyner was informant.

Annie Joyner Thomas died 30 October 1950 in Rocky Mount, Nash County. Per her death certificate, she was born 2 April 1900 in Wilson County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead; resided in Elm City; was married to John Thomas; and was buried in the Thomas family cemetery in Wilson County.

Herbert Joyner died 14 August 1966 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 January 1893 in Wilson County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead; was married to Laura Joyner; resided in Wilson; was a World War I veteran; and worked as a laborer.

Lula Joyner Eatmon died 25 January 1967 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 12 May 1894 in Nash County to Henry Joyner and Margaret Winstead; was married to Jarman Eatmon; and resided in Elm City.

  • Saint Paul’s Holiness Church — now Saint Paul Church of Christ, located on Lake Wilson Road northwest of Wilson?
  • Rev. Benny Melton — in the 1940 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Bennie Melton, 33; wife Julia, 34; children Ireen, 6, Kathreen, 4, Curtis, 3, Bennie Jr., 2, and Esther, 8 months; grandson Ramson Morgan, 4; and mother Frances Morgan, 57.

609 Viola Street.

The seventy-second in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1908; L-plan cottage with especially intact bracketed porch; asbestos shingled.”

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Viola Street, Wash Joyner, 35, house painter; wife Sarah, 32, laundress; and son Alexander, 13.

In 1917, Alexander Barnes Joyner registered for the World War I draft in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, his address was 616 Viola Street, and worked as a chair pusher for the Shill Company in Atlantic City. [Under the pre-1922 numbering system, 609 Viola was 616.]

In 1918, George Washington Joyner registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 15 April 1875; resided at 616 Viola Street; was a self-employed barber at 213 Goldsboro Street, Wilson; and his nearest relative was Sarah Jane Joyner, 616 Viola.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: public laborer Sarah Joyner, 45, widow, and son Elex, 22.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 609 Viola, owned and valued at $2000, maid Sarah Joyner, 40, widow.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Joyner Sarah (c) lndrs h 609 Viola

Sarah Joyner died 5 May 1943 at her home at 609 East Viola Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 66 years old; was born in Wilson County to Alex Barnes and Frances Stephens, both of Wilson County; was the widow of J. Washington Joyner; and was buried in Rountree cemetery. Informant was Annie Alexander of the home.

Photograph taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2017.

1922 Sanborn fire insurance map of Wilson, N.C. (The private school was, of course, the Independent School.)

I will get all the subscribers I can.

New York Age, 14 January 1915.

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In the 1908 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, painter, h 616 Viola.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: wagon factory laborer Willie Paulkin, 26, wife Pearl, 22, son Atric, 2, and brother Sam, 24, a wagon factory laborer; also house painter Wash Joyner, 35, wife Sarah, 32, a laundress, and son Alexander, 13.

In the 1912 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, barber, h 616 Viola.

In 1918, George Washington Joyner registered for the World War I draft. Per his registration card, he was born 15 April 1875; resided at 616 Viola Street; was a self-employed barber at 213 Goldsboro Street; and his nearest relative was Sarah Jane Joyner.

Lincoln U. students.

From the Catalogue of Lincoln University 1920-’21:

Sophomore class

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In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: wagon factory laborer Willie Paulkin, 26, wife Pearl, 22, son Atric, 2, and brother Sam, 24, also a wagon factory laborer; plus Wash Joyner, 35, house painter, wife Sarah, 32, laundress, and son Alexander, 13.

In 1917, Alexander B. Joyner registered for the World War I draft in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 616 Viola Street, Wilson; was single; and worked as a chair pusher for Shill Company in Atlantic City. He was described as medium height and build.

Alexander Barnes Joyner registered for the World War II draft in New York, New York, in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 249 West 139th Street, New York; his contact was “George Joyner (wife),” and he worked for the W.P.A., 70 Columbus Avenue, New York.

Freshman class

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: postmaster Samuel H. Vick, 37; wife Annie M., 28; and children Elba L., 17, and Daniel L., 3; plus cousin Bessie Parker, 15.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: dealer in real estate Samuel Vick, 47; wife Annie, 38; and children Elma, 17, Daniel L., 13, Samuel E., 10, George, 7, Anna, 5, and Robert, 2.

In 1918, Daniel Leon Vick registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1897 in Wilson; resided at 623 Green Street; his father was born in Nash County, North Carolina; he worked for S.H. Vick; and S.H. Vick was his nearest relative. He was described as short and medium build.

In the 1920 census of Washington, D.C.: at 1455 W Street N.W., North Carolina-born Daniel Vick, 22, boarded in the household of Charles L. Jones. He worked as an office building messenger.

Daniel L. Vick registered for the World War II draft in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1898 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 125 North 58th Street, Philadelphia; his contact was Mrs. Annie M. Vick, 622 East Green Street, Wilson; and he worked for John Wilds, 4035 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

All ’round in spots.

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Wilson Times, 3 October 1911.

Hassell Joyner registered for the World War I draft in 1918. At the time he was incarcerated. Per his registration card: he was born in 1879; resided at Camp #2, Bridgewater, McDowell County, North Carolina; and was “employed” as a convict at a state prison. His nearest relative was sister Millie Lucas, Elm City.

In the 1920 census of Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina: at the State’s Prison, Hassell Joyner, 36, listed as a prisoner.

Hassell Joyner died 3 June 1925 in Old Fields township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 49 years old; divorced; worked as a farm tenant for Mack Flowers; and had been born in Nash County to Patton Joyner and an unremembered mother. As cause of death: “Probable T.B. stated to us found dead in yard no doctor attended.” Charles Alston Williams was informant.

I have not been able to identify or locate Toad Town.

Some children told me Lucy Ann went to town.

joyner-1

Sept 15 – 1903

North Carolina, Wilson County

The examination of Smith Mercer taken before the undersigned Coroner of said County this 15th day of September 1903 at the court house upon the body of Lucy Ann Joyner then and there lying dead.

Smith Mercer being duly sworn said: All I know is that a woman and man passed my house on Saturday night about eight o’clock. Before the woman gets to the gate the woman asked the man to let her stop and the man said “Oh God damn it come on.” They went on down the road mumbling, I did not know him. I heard nothing more. I live on Sam Vick‘s farm near the Graded School. I did not know the woman never met Lucy Joyner. Heard the woman who passed was named Lucy Joyner. I was sitting near my door. Could not tell who the man and woman was.   Smith (X) Mercer

Thos Joyner being sworn said: I know Lucy Ann Joyner. She is my father’s sister. Worked on the farm with me. She was 19 years Worked with me about two months. She picked cotton on Saturday until dinner. She then stopped to do some washing She lived with me in the house, she cooked. We went to town and left her washing. I heard she came to town between sun set and dark. Until two months ago she lived in Rocky Mount with a man named Tom Mercer. She was in family way. She was expecting bed next month. When I got home I was sure Lucy was there but found her gone. Found some of her clothes in Harrison Battle’s house to get supper. Dora Woodard was with me. Some children told me Lucy went to town. I live about a mile from where Lucy was found. Dora’s children told me Lucy went to town about dark. Was told that she was seen in town about nine o’clock. I came to town yesterday and made an effort to find her. She had asked me to go down the county after a girl to wait on her. I waited until last night to begin to hunt for her. I came to town and went to Rachael Staton and asked if she had seen Lucy Ann Joyner. Josephine Staton told me that she had seen Lucy Ann on Saturday night. Told me that she saw her below the rail road between 8 & 9 o’clock. Was talking to a heavy black fellow. When she saw her again she was with Charity at the depot as if she was going to get off on the train. I made my self satisfied that she was gone on the train. I waited last night to see if Lucy Ann came back. I got home on Saturday night about moon rise. Guess it was about ten o’clock. I went home with Dora on Saturday night. Don’t know when I left town on Saturday. I went to Dilly‘s house to get some clothes and left there about half past nine o’clock. Don’t know who else saw Lucy Ann. Heard a colored woman named Miller saw her. The clothes the woman wore were Lucy’s. I knew her condition I went up to  the body this morning and examined it and think the dead woman was Lucy Ann Joyner. I went home from Dilly’s straight home. Dora’s children were at home alone and we wanted to get back as quick as possible. I expected to see Lucy when I got there.   Thos X Joyner

Dora Woodard being duly sworn says: I left Lucy Ann at home Saturday when I came town. We were on good terms. We quarrelled but she asked me to forgive her and I did it. We quarrelled at a dance at Mr Ben Owens place the last of Old Christmas. She had been living with me about ten months. She was living with Sarah Pettaway at Old Christmas. Sarah lived at Mr Ben Owens place. I used to live down there and met her down there. We fought a little but it did not last me long. I got hurt a little. Lucy lived with Harrison Battle ever since July. Do not know where she lived before we made up the fourth week in July. We were good friends. Lucy washed for me on Saturday and let me come to town. I am not married. I have four children. My oldest child is 12 years old and the youngest is 3 years and I am 27 years old. Lucy said she had one child and it was living. I have no sweetheart and Lucy said hers had run away. I do not know what time I got home on Saturday night. I went home with Thos. Joyner. We came to town together and went back together. We started from Dilly’s house. We went by where Lucy was killed. We fell out about dancing. The quarrel took place  the second week in July. I quarrelled because I thought I was as good dancer as she was. We made up the third or fourth week in July. We did not stay mad long. I did not see Lucy Ann in town on Saturday night Ida Barnes told me that she saw her on Saturday night. Ida said she met her near where she was killed or found. It was about dark when Ida met her. Ida said she was coming towards town. Lucy Ann did not come to town often. She came with me once before and we went back together. I have not seen any men around Lucy’s house. I do not know how long Lucy lived in town before she went out Harrison.  Dora (X) Woodard

Bynyan Mitchell being sworn says: When I went from town about six o’clock on Saturday I got mule and wagon from Mr Amerson to fetch his cotton and I had some things on the wagon and had to carry the team on by Mr Amersons place to my house. When I went on Lucy Ann was standing in the door putting on her hat. I said “Hello,””It is too late to go out now.” It was a white straw hat. I have not seen her since. She was gone when I brought the team back from Mr Amersons. She told me when I passed that she thought she would go to town. I did not go near the body and could not say it was Lucy Ann. The hat found near the body was the same I saw Lucy putting on I live about 300 yds from Lucy Ann’s house.  Bynyan (X) Mitchell

Harrison Battle being duly sworn says: I left Lucy at home when I left Saturday evening. I left with Thos Joyner and Dora Woodard. Did not see her any more. She was washing. I got home Monday morning. Stayed in town with my wife on the stow until Monday. I heard about her being missed when I got back. Tom said to me when I came in “Our cook is gone.” He asked me if I knew any thing about her going away and I said yes. She told me she was coming town after she got through washing. I told her to clear up everything. Told her I was not coming back until Monday morning. I have not seen her since if that was not her I saw this morning Lucy said she was not going to cook supper for us if I was not coming back. Dora and Lucy acted like they were on good terms. My wife left me the 4th Monday in May. I got to my wife’s house about dark and stayed there until Monday morning.   Harrison (X) Battle

Dr Paul Anderson being sworn said: Chas Woodard and myself cut off the clothes from the dead body. Consisting of waist under body shirt and corset. We were not able to find on account of the decomposed state of the body anything which pointed to violence. We did find however the left hand of a child protruding from the vulver. We turned the body over and examined it thoroughly. We found the body very badly decayed especially the throat and tissues under the jaw. The eyes were entirely gone and the skin on the face was partly gone. The skin on a greater part of the body had pealed off. Decomposition would have started at any opening. The position of the body was that which you would expected from a woman in labor. Blood was found on the clothes in several places.  /s/ P.V. Anderson

Dr Chas Woodard being duly sworn says: Around her neck was a part of a waist in the shape of a blue collar. On the ground near her feet was the top skirt. The skin and underlying tissues were pealed off on the face. Both clavicles were exposed. The opening above the breast bone was through the skin but did not have the appearance of a stab but of decomposition. Just above the left clavicle was another place of like nature. In the left groin there was another place of a like nature about two inches in length. In the back between scapulae was a similar place.  Chas. A. Woodard

Josephine Staton being duly sworn says: I saw Lucy Ann on Saturday night. She and a fellow were sitting on the slant near Salt Lake’s. I do not know the man she was with. He was buying her some apples or bananas. The man was a little slim fellow. I did not see her any more. She went to the ticket office like she was going off on the train. I did not see her any more She went to the office all alone. I first saw Lucy Ann with a dark man sitting down on the slant below the rail road. I left Mrs. Duke’s kitchen a little after six o’clock. Got up town about 6:30. I came up town and then went below the rail road and saw Lucy Ann talking to a dark man. I saw Tom Joyner last night and I told him that I saw Lucy on Saturday night. I saw and spoke to Lucy. She asked me how I was getting along. Lucy stayed at our house about a month. Lucy was out of the way. I am 21 years old. Have had two children. I did not know anything about Lucy’s sweet heart. I am not married.   Josephine (X) Staton

Commr’s Inquest over body of Lucy Ann Joyner

Filed Sept 17, 1903

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  • Smith Mercer — in the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Smith Mercer, 60, wife Chaney, 46, children Lily V., 12, LeRoy, 8, and Linda, 24, and grandchildren Annie Bell, 6, and Charlie, 1.
  • Lucy Ann Joyner — in the 1900 census of Rocky Mount, Nash County: Peter Joyner, 89, with daughters Rosetta, 51, and Lucy A. Joyner, 16. [Per Thomas Joyner’s testimony that Lucy was his father’s sister, Peter Joyner was his grandfather.]
  • Dora Woodard — in the 1900 census of Gardners township: Mary Woodard, 45, children Dora, 23, Allice, 18, John, 16, Lewis, 14, and Annie, 5, and grandchildren Oscar, 9, William, 5, and James, 2. [These are the oldest of the four children to which Dora testified.]
  • Thomas Joyner — in the 1900 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: Reuben Joyner, 54, wife Millie, 59, children Thomas, 33, Josephine, 21, Alexandria, 30, John, 25, Sarah, 22, Malinda, 18, Roland, 15, Victoria, 10, and grandchildren Purnell, 10, Eddie, 7, Lizzie, 4, John, 4, and Bessie, 1.
  • Rachel and Josephine Staton — in the 1908 Wilson city directory, Josephine Staton is listed as a cook living at 410 East Green. On 26 July 1908, Rachel Staton, 40, daughter of Willis and Miller Staton, married C. Columbus Gay, 50, son of Spencer and Annie Gay at the sheriff’s office. Sheriff George W. Mumford performed the ceremony. In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: odd jobs laborer Columbus Gay; wife Rachel, 42, a farm laborer; and step-children Josie, 27, laundress, Caroline, 14, private nurse, and Martha, 10. In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Robinson [Roberson] Street, Columbus Gay, 55, wife Rachel, 41, stepdaughters Josephine, 27, Caroline, 21, and Martha Staton, 17, and grandson James Staton, 5.
  • “Salt Lake” — William Harris, a Polish Jew who offered his services as storekeeper, druggist, auctioneer, and failed Populist politician.

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Excerpt from “Populists County Canvass Yesterday,” Wilson Daily Times, 23 October 1896.

  • Sarah Pettaway
  • Ida Barnes
  • Harrison Battle — in the 1900 census of Cokey township, Edgecombe County: Harrison Battle, 34, farmer, wife Annie, 32, and boarder Lula Joyner, 19. In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Wilson Road, Harrison Battle, 46, wife Annie, 46, and children Martha C., 15, and Willie Battle, 10. In the 1920 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Harrison Battle, 60, and wife Annie, 60. Harrison Battle died 30 October 1920 in North Whitakers township, Nash County. Per his death certificate, he was born about 1865, was the widower of Annie Battle, worked as a farm laborer, and was the son of Millie Joyner. Informant was Willie Ervin, Whitakers. [Thomas Joyner’s mother was named Millie Joyner. Were the two half-brothers? Otherwise kin?]
  • Bunyan Mitchell — in the 1850 census of Nash County: Mary Mitchell, 40, and children George, 16, Willie, 20, Eliza, 12, Henry, 6, and Bunyan, 2. In the 1860 census of Buck Swamp township, Wayne County: Absalom Artis, 32, wife Eliza, 22, and their children John F., 4, James W., 2, and George W., 3 months, plus Mary Mitchell, 55, and sons Henry, 16, and Bunyan, 14. In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Bunyan Mitchell, 53, and wife Louise, 51, married 31 years.  In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Bunnion Mitchell, 61, and wife Louisa, 59. On 6 April 1919, Bunyan Mitchell, 70, married Clara Anderson, 50, at London Church. Reverend Charles H. Hagans performed the ceremony before James H. Armstrong, Moses Parker and Telfair Joyner. In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Old Stantonsburg Road, Bunyan Mithell, 72, wife Clara, 50, and her child and grandchildren C[illegible], 30, Clara, 13, and Bessie Arrington, 9. Bunyan Mitchell died 21 October 1922 in “the country,” Wilson township, Wilson County. He was 70 years old, the son of Mary Mitchell, married to Clara Mitchell, and worked as a tenant farmer. Informant was Henry Mitchell, R.F.D. 6, Wilson.

Coroner’s Records, Miscellaneous Records, Wilson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

 

The roots of Rev. W.O. Wells.

dr-w-o-wells-sr-passes

The Rev. Dr. Willie Oliver Wells Sr.–- pastor of Greater St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church, in Cocoa, Florida, for more than 50 years, well-known civil rights leader, and great servant of the Lord in church and civic affairs –- died on November 4, 2015. He was 84.

Rev. Wells was an inspiring leader who identified with the struggle for decency, justice and security for all people. The U.S. Army veteran served the church and his country with fearless courage and was a champion of all causes he believed to be right. His kind, friendly spirit will be missed, especially by those who worked closely with him.

Rev. Wells rendered faithful service and will long be remembered for his many contributions to the betterment of our community. Not the least of these is the part he played in the development of affordable housing for local residents, equal opportunity employment, and his leadership and courageous support of racial justice.

Rev. Wells was born on April 11, 1931, in Miami. He was the youngest of seven children born to Lillie and Rev. Oliver W. Wells Sr., pastor of Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church, Fort Lauderdale.

He graduated from Dillard High School in 1949 and attended Bethune Cookman College on a football scholarship. During his sophomore year, his father passed, and he entered the U.S. Army. He attended leadership school in Virginia, and was stationed in Germany for two years. Afterwards, he attended Fisk University and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree. Also, he attended the American Baptist Theological Seminary in Nashville, and graduated with a Bachelor of Theology degree in 1955.

In 1955, he married Annie Ruth Collins of Cocoa. The couple lived in Tennessee, and he was pastor of Westwood Baptist Church, Nashville, for two years.

In 1959, when there was a vacancy for a pastor at Greater St. Paul Baptist Church, Rev. Wells was selected to fill that position. Then, the couple moved to Cocoa.

At that time, blacks were barred from public beaches, parks, restrooms and restaurants, in Brevard County and elsewhere. Rev. Wells worked to change the oppressive “Jim Crow” laws. During the early 1960’s, Rev. Wells was a Freedom Rider who led non-violent civil protests. He was an original member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference -–along with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.–- and during his lifetime Rev. Wells spearheaded many projects to combat racism, poverty, drug abuse and crime. He was instrumental in bringing about desegregation in Brevard County, where he led anti-segregation campaigns and held various civic leadership positions.

He served as president of the Brevard County branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, vice-president of the Florida branch of the NAACP, and chairman of the Redevelopment Commission of the City of Cocoa.

Rev. Wells established the Community Action Agency of Brevard, which provided low-income day care centers; Project Uplift, a fund for interest free loans to the church’s members; and in 1968, he constructed two low-rent apartment complexes, Shull Manor in Melbourne and Tropical Manor in Merritt Island. In 1978, Dr. Wells led Greater St. Paul Baptist Church in building a $1.2 million complex.

Dr. Annie Ruth Wells passed in 2008. Rev. Wells retired as pastor of Greater St. Paul Baptist Church in 2011. He leaves to mourn his passing his four children, Rev. Willie Oliver Wells Jr. (Jimmie Lee), Rev. Oliver W. Wells (Linda), and Annette O. Wells, all of Cocoa; and Dee Dee Wells (Michael) of Maryland; and 10 grandchildren.

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Florida civil rights leader Rev. W.O. Wells had roots in Wilson County. His grandfather Burt Wells was born in Toisnot township circa 1872 to Alexander and Nancy Joyner Wells and migrated to south Georgia in the late 1800s. Burt Wells’ son Oliver W. Wells, born in 1895 in Willacoochee, Georgia, was Rev. W.O. Wells’ father.

On 28 May 1868, Ellick Wells, son of Kain and Milly Wells, married Nancy Joyner, daughter of Polly Joyner, at Harris Winstead’s in Wilson County.

On 19 December 1868, Isaac Wells, son of Cain and Milly Wells, married Clarky Farmer, daughter of Ben Dowley and Ellen Dowly, at C.C. Barnes’ in Wilson County.

In 1868, Cain Wells obtained a license to marry Sarah Braswell, daughter of Quincy Braswell. The license was not registered with the Wilson County clerk and, presumably, the couple never married.

Toney Wells, son of Cain and Milly Wells, married Laura Ethridge, daughter of Julia Ethridge, in Liberty township, Nash County, on 30 January 1869.

In the 1870 census of Upper Town Creek township, Edgecombe County: Ellick Wells, 26, Nancy, 18, Clara, 2, and Milly Batchelor, 70.

Nancy died in the early 1870s, and, on 3 August 1879, Alex Wells, 33, married Easter Parker, 22, in Wilson County.

In the 1880 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farm laborer Al’x Wells, 35, wife Easter, 19, and children Delpha, 10, Birt, 8, and Arnold, 7.

Delphia Wells married William Drake on 1 July 1888 at A.F. Williams’ in Toisnot township.

In perhaps the early 1890s, Burt Wells and perhaps his father Alex moved from Wilson County to south Georgia. The 1900 census of Pearson township, Coffee County, Georgia, shows: Alexander Wells, 60, born in North Carolina, with his wife of seven years, Mary Ann, 40. Burt is not found in the 1900 census, but the World War I draft registrations of his oldest sons Willie, Oliver and Dewey show that they were born in Coffee (now Atkinson) County, Georgia.

In the 1910 census of Pearson township, Coffee County, Georgia: farmer Burt Wells, 45, wife Susie, 34, and children Sindy, 15, Elisah, 14, Willie, 12, Oliver, 11, Duey, 10, Oscar, 8, Delphy, 7, Squire, 6, Arnold, 4, Felton, 2, boarder Solomon Street, 21.

In the 1920 census of Pearson township, Atkinson County, Georgia: on Columbine Road, Burt Wells, 50, wife Lela, 30, and children Dewey, 22, Arnel, 13, Felton, 10, Osie, 3½, and Odom, 1 1/2.

In the 1930 census of Military District 1026, Atkinson County, Georgia: North Carolina-born Bert Wells, 60, wife Lelia, 37, and children Ocie, 13, Odom, 11.

Photograph credit to and obituary adapted from www.blackchristiannews.com.

 

 

They have urged me to take them from their father.

Bu.R.F.&A.L., Office Asst. Sub. Asst. Com, Rocky Mount N.C. Dec 3rd 1867

Brt.Lt.Col. C.E. Compton, Sub. Asst. Com.

Colonel

There is a colored man living in Wilson County by the name of Exum Joyner, who has five children, the oldest is about fifteen years of age.

The children have been to me twice and urged me to take them from their father & send them to some place where they could earn a comfortable support & protect them in so doing. I told them I had no authority to take them away from their father & sent them back to him.

I have made enquiries of both White & Black men who are neighbors, and know Exum’s character & the response has been, in every case, that he is Lazy worthless fellow & that he does not take [care] of his children.

They were certainly in a pitiable condition when they came to my office.

Would it be proper for me to ask the court in Wilson County to appoint a guardian for them

These children have a half brother who is twenty five years old, and he is an active, intelligent man; he is willing to take charge of them, providing he can be properly authorized.

I have the honor to be, Very Respectfully, Your Obed’t Svt.,

Wm. H. Culler, Brt.Lt.Col. & A.S.A.C.

Freedmen Bureau Records of Field Offices, 1863-1878 [database online], http://www.ancestry.com.

Where did they go?: Indiana death certificates, no. 2.

Death certificates of Wilson County natives who died in Indiana.

  • Caroline Shirley Simms

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Caroline Simms died 30 July 1922 in Indianapolis. Her death certificate reports that she was born September 1850 in Wilson, North Carolina, to Robert Shirley and Caroline Barnes.

Jefrey Simms, son of Willis Hagans and Dicey Simms, married Carolin Barnes, daughter of Robert Dupree and Meneney Dupree, on 19 April 1869 in Wilson County. In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Jeffrey Simms, 24, wife Caroline, 21, and an unnamed one month-old daughter.

In the 1880 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: North Carolina-born laborer Jeff Sims, 35, wife Carline, 25, and daughters Martha, 10, Maliza, 6, Lillie, 3, and Laura, 1.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Center township, Marion County, Indiana: at 746 Walnut, North Carolina-born widow Caroline Simms, 47, a washerwoman, with daughters Mary, 27, Laura, 21, and Bessie, 17. Mary was a divorced washerwoman. Laura was a servant, and Bessie, the only child born in Indiana, was a student.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2323 North Rural Street, Virginia-born Robert Evans, 43, hotel porter, Indiana-born wife Elizabeth, 33, public school teacher, and North Carolina-born mother Caroline Sims, 63. (All described as white.)

The death certificates of her daughters Mary Simms Berry and Laura Simms Clemmons are here.

  • Stella Tomlinson Maxwell

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Stella Maxwell died 17 October 2000 aged 100. Her death certificate reports that she was born in Wilson County, North Carolina, on 24 April 1900 to Ernest Thomlingson and Nancy Newsom.

  • Lewis Henry Deans Sr.

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Lewis H. Deans died 25 January 2004 in Indianapolis. His death certificate reports that he was born 11 October 1913 in Elm City, North Carolina, to Joshua Deans and Julia Arrington.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Josuah Deams, 62; wife Julia, 39; and children Glendora, 19, Minnie, 14, Daisy, 13, James, 11, Ernest, 9, Allen 8, Louis, 6, Armon and Norman, 4, John, 2, and Mary and Martha, 8 months.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on the By Road, Josh Deans, 71; wife Julia, 50; and children James, 21, Louis, 16, Orman and Norman, 15, John, 13, and Mary and Martha M., 10, Josh A., 9, and Julia, 7.

Lewis left Wilson County in the 1930s. In 1938, he married Gilberdia T. Lathery in Macomb County, Michigan, north of Detroit. Their marriage license listed his residence as Washington, D.C., and occupation as porter.

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  • Lilly Evora Simms Harris

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Lilly Harris died 8 February 1911 in Warren, Marion County, Indiana. Her death certificate reported that she was born in Wilson, North Carolina, on 26 January 1875 to Jeff Simms and Caroline Shirley. [See above.]

In the 1880 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: North Carolina-born laborer Jeff Sims, 35, wife Carline, 25, and daughters Martha, 10, Maliza, 6, Lillie, 3, and Laura, 1.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1818 Rural, day laborer Robert Harris, 24, and wife Lillie, 23.

  • Louisa Artis Hester

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Louisa Hester died 10 June 1921 in Indianapolis. Her death certificate states that she was born 27 December 1923 in Wilson, North Carolina, to Lewis Artis and Louisa Artis.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1021 South West Street, day laborer William Hester, 55, wife Louisa, 53, Indiana-born daughter Clarissa McGown, 23, son-in-law Nathen, 25, a railroad porter, grandson Harreld, 5, and granddaughter Babe, 2 months.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: train cook Ned McGowan, 36, wife Clara, 36, and children Harold, 15, and Abbie, 10, plus William Hester, 58, and wife Louisa Hester, 62.

  • Henry Joyner

45232_356152-00944

Henry Joyner died 11 February 1940 in Indianapolis, Indiana. His death certificate reports that he was born 15 October 1861 in Wilson, North Carolina to unknown parents.

On 24 January 1882, Henry Joyner, 24, married Annie Knight, 26, in Wilson County.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1117 North Tremont Street, Henry Joyner, 49, wife Anna, 35, and children Edwin, 13, Stella, 11, Laura, 9, George, 7, Thomas, 4, and Cora, 2.

In the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1117 North Tremont Street, Henry Joyner, 55, wife Annie, 44, and children Edwin, 23, Laura, 19, George, 16, Thomas, 14, Cora, 11, Cecil, 9, and Henry, 7. Edwin was born in North Carolina; the other children in Indiana.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 1117 North Tremont Street, Henry Joyner, 60, wife Anna, 5o, and children Laura, 28, George, 26, and Thomas, 24.

In the 1930 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: at 2858 Highland Place, Henry Joyner, 73, wife Annie C., 65, son George E., 36, grandsons Harry Booker, 10, and Chas. R. Joyner, 7.

  • John D. Kersey

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John D. Kersey died 24 June 1901. His death certificate reported that he was 13 years old and born in Wilson, North Carolina, to Walter D. Kersey and Anis Williams.

  • Walter D. Kersey

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Walter D. Kersey died 30 March 1915 in Indianapolis’ City Hospital. His death certificate reports that he was born 28 May 1862 in North Carolina to John Kersey and Julia Richardson.

In the 1870 census of Wilson, Wilson County: blacksmith John Kirsey, 45, wife Julia, 42, and children Louisa 19, Idella, 16, John, 13, Walter, 10, and Robt., 9.

In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County: blacksmith John Kersey, 61; wife Julia, 53; and son Walter, 21; plus boarder William Joyner, who worked in the blacksmith shop.

In the 1910 census of Center township, Marion County, Indiana: widower Walter Kersey, 40, a blacksmith, was a boarder in a household at 914 Weikel Street.

  • Sidney Lucas 

45232_354484-02540

  • Martha Ann Simms Ratcliffe

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Martha Ann Ratcliffe died 12 February 1961 at her home at 711 Dorman Street, Indianapolis. Her death certificate reports that she was born 8 May 1871 in Wilson, North Carolina, to Jeff Sims and Caroline Shirley. (See Caroline Simms above.)

In the 1880 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: North Carolina-born laborer Jeff Sims, 35, wife Carline, 25, and daughters Martha, 10, Maliza, 6, Lillie, 3, and Laura, 1.

In the 1900 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: day laborer Xanophene Sims [sic], 35, wife Martha, 29, and children Roy, 4, Wallie, 3, and Ruth, 5.

Martha and Xenophon Ratcliffe lost a son, Wayne, on the same day he was born, 19 June 1908. In 1916, another tragedy struck Martha Simms Ratcliff’s family:

ratcliffe-5-2-1916

Indianapolis News, 2 May 1916.

In the 1920 census of Indianapolis, Indiana: Kentucky-born Xenophon Ratcliff, 63, a school board janitor; wife Martha, 55, a cook; Walter, 22, meat presser in a packing house; Ruth, 21, , Carrie, 20, Elizabeth, 18, Jeff S., 15, Martha, 13, and nephew Walter Ratcliff.