Music

A song of adoration.

In 1939, Spencer J. Satchell penned original music and lyrics for an alma mater for Charles H. Darden High School.

—–

We sing a song of adoration, a song full of love and praise,

For the school that is our inspiration, for the place where we spend our high school days

We dedicate our thoughts to thee, thoughts of true love and good will

Loyal students we will always be, as we journey o’er the rugged hills

Dear ol’ Darden High!

We laud thee to the sky, we sing thy name in reverence,

Praise Darden High! Darden High!

We raise our Alma Mater, Darden High!

Although from thee we must part, this song will linger within

Yearning and longing in our hearts, for our Alma Mater we will sing

We strive to do our best, while we proudly sing thy name

May we love, work and be blessed, this is our beloved refrain!

Hartford E. Bess, minister of music.

Wilson Daily Times, 23 July 1934.

Wilson Daily Times, 11 April 1935.

Wilson Daily Times, June 28, 1940.

Wilson Daily Times, 14 May 1949.

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In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 208 Pender Street, widow Minnie Best, 48; and children Hartford, 30, delivery boy for retail dry goods business; Ruth, 27, teacher at Williamston School; James, 23, janitor at Oettinger’s store; and Glenwood, 10, grocery delivery boy.

In 1940, Hartford Eugene Bess was registered for the World War II draft. Per his registration card, he resided at 208 Pender Street; was born 9 September 1910 in Wilson; his contact was his mother Minnie Luevenia Bess; and he worked for David Oettinger, 110 West Nash Street.

On 23 July 1960, Hartford E. Bess, 44, married June Wilkins Manley, 37, in the presence of Ruth G. Bess, Alice B. Mitchell and Nora A. Jones. Baptist minister Talmadge Watkins performed the service.

Wilson Daily Times, 3 December 1988.

 

 

A singer in evangelistic meetings.

“Who are the best-known African American voices in Adventist church music?

“Some may answer with selections from among today’s well-known songsters: Wintley Phipps, Charles Haugabrooks, the Aeolians. But there is also a good case to be made for names not so well known, their music sung by saints from week to week and year to year in a thousand congregations across the breadth of our world church: “This Little Light of Mine,” “Nothing Between My Soul and the Savior,” “Go, Tell It on the Mountain,” “Give Me Jesus.” Isn’t it worth our while to remember who these individuals are? Their contributions to the spiritual growth and grounding of generations of Adventists and other Christians deserve more than the casual rendition of their songs. These composers and arrangers deserve our intelligent appreciation.

Charles Lee Brooks (1923-1989), born in Wilson, North Carolina, and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, began singing at age 4. Though keenly interested in classical music, Brooks is best remembered by Adventists as a singer in evangelistic meetings. As a personal memory, I was fortunate to serve as his teenaged accompanist during a memorable evangelistic series by E. E. Cleveland labeled the ‘Trinidad Triumph.’ Later, as an associate in the General Conference Secretariat, Brooks established the Office of Church Music and became its chair. He served as chair of the Church Hymnal Committee.”

— Excerpt from Nevilla E. Ottley-Adjahoe, “We Sing Their Songs: Significant Voices in African American Church Music,” Adventist Review, http://www.adventistreview.org

Recommended reading, no. 2.

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A project of North Carolina Arts Council and local partners, African American Music Trails of Eastern North Carolina (2013) is a 218-page insider’s guide to the music traditions of an eight-county region. Drawn largely from interviews with living musicians and interspersed with vivid photographs and up-close vignettes, the book devotes thirty pages to Wilson County’s rich musical history, both sacred and secular.  Highlights include the role of Reid Street Community Center (and tobacco warehouses) as music venues, shape note singing and hymn lining, and influential music teachers. The book suggests travel routes for each section and includes a 17-track CD of eastern North Carolina recordings.

The best people buy the best pianos.

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In the very long “partial list of Ivers & Pond purchasers”:

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Charlotte Daily Observer, 15 August 1909.

  • A.J.C. Moore — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: retail grocer Andrew Moore, 51, wife Robetta, 39, and children Evyln, 17, Omia, 16, and Willie, 1. Moore also worked as a teacher.
  • Clarissa Williams