Wilson County

Studio shots, no. 26: James Thomas Clifton.

James T Clifton ths1369

James Thomas Clifton (1857-1932).

James Clifton, 32, married Susan Clifton, 21, on 26 November 1889 in Franklin County at J.T. Clifton’s. Jackson Hunt and Bet Clifton witnessed.

In the 1900 census of Harris township, Franklin County: farmer Jim Clifton, 45; wife Susan, 31; and children Grant, 20, Matilda, 18, Susan, 16, John L., 14, Genievieve, 8, Tommie, 6, Mary, 4, Martha, 2, and Myrtle, 3 months.

In the 1910 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: on Edmunson Road, farmer James T. Clifton, 52; wife Susan, 40; and children Genevieve, 18, Thomas, 16, Mary, 14, Mattie, 12, Myrtle M., 10, Eula P., 8, Minnie B., 6, Wesley, 3, and Leona, 2, plus lodger Arthur Bunn, 21. James reported that he had been married twice.

Susan Clifton died 25 August 1915 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 44 years old; married; and the daughter of Stiff and Ellen Clifton. James Clifton was informant.

Between 1916 and 1920, three licenses for marriages of a James Clifton were filed at Wilson County Register of Deeds office. It is not clear if any or all are this James Clifton. (If all, he endured extraordinary grief in a very short time span.) On 6 February 1916, James Clifton, 54, of Wilson, married Mary Barnes, 40, of Wilson. Primitive Baptist minister John S. May performed the ceremony in Wilson win the presence of James Bass, Henry Meak and Melvis Jones. On 8 July 1917, James Clifton, 52, of Taylor township, married Emma Grady, 41, of Wilson, in Wilson. Otis Wright applied for the license and Elder J.R. Pitt, Disciples of Christ, performed the ceremony in the presence of Willie Godwin, Lillian Hawkins and James Lewis. On 23 May 1920, James Clifton, 57, of Wilson married Martha J. Coffield, 50, of Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister William Baker performed the ceremony in the presence of Susie Barnes, Lena Newsome and Beatrice Cofield.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 500 Spring Street alley, widower James Clifton, 53, lumber company laborer, and son Thomas, 25, lumber company laborer; daughter-in-law Ethel, 20; daughters Mattie, 22, Myrtle, 20, and Ella, 14, all tobacco factory laborers; and boarders Ella Mitchell, 22, a widowed tobacco factory laborer, and her children Dorothy, 4, Y.C., 2, and James, 3 months.

James Clifton died 14 July 1932 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 74 years old; married to Jannie Clifton; worked as a common laborer; and was burnin Franklin County to James Reid and Lizzie Clifton. Bennie Bass was informant, and C.E. Artis was undertaker.

Photograph courtesy of Ancestry.com user ths1369.

Where did they go?: Out-of-state World War II draft registrations, no. 1.

 

Elton Henry Thomas was the son of Charles Thomas and Sarah Best Thomas. He returned to North Carolina; he died in Goldsboro in 1970.

  • Clarence Charles Dawson

Clarence Charles Dawson was the son of Clarence C. Dawson (see below) and Elizabeth Thomas Dawson.

  • Clarence Connor Dawson

Clarence Connor Dawson was the son of Alexander D. Dawson and Lucy Hill Dawson.

  • Leroy Armstrong

  • Walter Armstrong

  • Van Armstrong

Van Armstrong was the son of Guston and Drucilla Armstrong of Toisnot township, Wilson County. He first appears in the federal census of Petersburg, Virginia, in 1930.

Charles S. Alston was the son of James H. and Martha Dew Alston of Wilson township, Wilson County. On 3 November 1920, Charles S. Alston, 24, married Lessie Barbrey, 22, daughter of Hulis and Lola Barbrey, in Elm City. A.M.E. Zion minister B.P. Coward performed the ceremony in the presence of James O. Bunn, William H. Woods and Charles S. Thomas, all of Wilson.

  • David Alston

David Daniel Alston was the son of Henry and Mary Taylor Alston. He died 8 November 1974 in Norfolk, Virginia.

  • James Henry Adams

  • Edward Adams

 

Nettie Seaberry and Katie Barnes.

Seabury Barnes 12 6 49

Wilson Daily Times, 6 December 1949.

——

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Mark Forsyth, 48; wife Mary, 28; children Gilford, 14, Nettie, 9, Ottis, 6, and Floster, 2; nieces Rebecca, 5, and Louettie, 30; and nephew Willie Forsyth, 22.

On 29 December 1908, Timothy Ceberry, 21, of Cross Roads township, son of Jesse Ceberry and Dollie Barnes, married Nettie Forsythe, 20, of Cross Roads, daughter of Mark and Mary Forsythe. Free Will Baptist minister James(?) Richardson performed the ceremony at the bride’s home in the presence of William Forsythe, James Daniel and Frank Barnes.

In the 1910 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Timothy Sebury, 20, and wife Nettie, 19.

On 5 June 1917, Timothy Seaberry registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 26 October 1889; resided in Lucama; worked as a tenant farmer for J.H. Lamm; had a dependant wife and children and a “short leg from having been broken.”  He was literate and signed his name in clear cursive.

In the 1920 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Timothy Seabury, 30; wife Nettie F., 29; and children Joseph, 10, and Tramilla, 9.

In the 1930 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Timothy Seaberry, 42; wife Nettie, 42; children Joseph, 17, and Trumiller, 15; and boarder Benjamin Kirby, 19.

In the 1940 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer Temathy Seabbry, 51; wife Nettie, 51; Cora M., 8; and farmhand George Hinnant, 18.

Nettie Seabury died 2 December 1949 in Lucama, Cross Roads township. Per her death certificate, she was born 9 October 1888 in Durham County to Mark Tate and Mary Morgan. She was buried in Williamson cemetery.

——

On 23 March 1916, Katie Bynum, 20, and Robert Barnes, 21, of Stantonsburg, were married by Missionary Baptist minister S.H. Jones in the presence of Jas. Walter Newsom, General Ellis, and Bennie Barnes.

In 1918, Robert Lee Barnes registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 20 September 1898; resided on R. 2, Stantonsburg; farmed for Fred Washington; and his nearest relative was Katie Barnes. He signed his card with a firm hand.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Robert Barnes, 22; wife Katy, 22; son [sic] William, 12, and daughter Alice, 7; nephew Augustus Speight, 15; and lodger Sarah Hagan, 17.

In the 1930 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Robert Barnes, 32; wife Kallie, 32; and children Alice, 12, John L., 12, Bessie M., 8, Robert L., 7, Mitchell, 5, and Fred A., 9 months.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Suggs Street, tobacco factory laborer Hattie Barnes, 46, and children Robert, 18, James, 14, and Fred A., 10; also lumber Fred Barnes, 40; wife Percy L., 26; and children Claudett, 6, Fred L. Jr., 2, and Clarence, no age given.

Kattie Barnes died 4 December 1949 at her home at 648 Suggs Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 15 November 1902 in Greene County to Johnnie and Alice Bynum and was married. Informant was Alice Moses of Wilson.

Doretha W.E. Parker, 100.

Doretha White Evans Parker, 100, a resident of Wilson Pines Nursing Center and formerly of 4968 Lake Wilson Rd., Elm City, NC died Sunday [8 April 2012] at Wilson Medical Center. The funeral will be held Saturday at 1:00 pm at William Chapel Baptist Church, 6154 William Chapel Church Rd., Elm City, NC with Rev. Jimmy Parker, pastor, officiating. Interment will follow in William Chapel Cemetery. As a centenerian Mrs. Parker has seen five generations of family. Left to cherish her memory are three children; Joseph Carl “JC” Evans (Alice) of San Antonio, Tx, John Estee Parker (Evelyn) of Greensboro, NC and James Parker of Durham, NC; one brother, Fred White (Thelma) of Durham, NC; 13 grandchildren; several great-grandchildren and many great-great grandchildren and several great-great-great grandchildren, nieces, nephews, other relatives and many friends. Her mantle was passed to her dear nieces, including Evelyn Lindsey Lucas, who was her diligent caregiver. Public viewing will be held on Friday from 2-7 at the funeral home with the family receiving friends there from 7- 8 pm. Family and friends will assemble on Saturday at 12 noon at the home of her niece Eunice Lindsey, 204 S. Railroad Street, Elm City, NC for the procession to the church. Professional and personal services are entrusted to EDWARDS FUNERAL HOME, 805 E. Nash Street, Wilson, NC. Condolences may be directed to edwardscares.com.

Obituary online.

——

Per a Wilson County Birth Index, Doretha White was born in 1912 to Joe T. White and Lula Edwards.

In the 1930 census of Coopers township, Nash County: farmer Joe T. White, 53, divorced; and children Arthor, 29, Doretha, 18, Catherine M., 16, Joe T., 14, Altas R., 10, and Nannie F., 6.

Studio shots, no. 25: Amanda Artis Jones.

Amanda Bell Artis

Amanda Bell Artis Jones (1916-2006).

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg & Wilson Road, farm manager June S. Artis, 30, wife Ethel, 26, and children James, 7, Edgar, 7, Manda Bell, 3, and farm laborer Edgar Exum.

In the 1930 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer June S. Artis, 40, wife Ethel P., 34, and children James B., 17, Edgar J., 15, Amanda B., 14, and Gladys L. Artis, 5.

On 7 January 1937, Jospeh Jones, 22, of Stantonsburg, son of Joseph and Jennie Jones, married Amanda B. Artis, 20, of Stantonsburg, daughter of June and Ethel Artis, in Stantonsburg. Methodist minister S. Chapman performed the ceremony in the presence of Amanda’s father June S. Artis and uncle C.E. Artis and Elizabeth Hardy.

42091_343647-00702.jpg

In the 1940 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Joe Jones Jr. and wife Mandabelle, both 21.

In 1940, Joe Jones listed Amanda Bell Jones as his contact when he registered for the World War II draft.

Screen Shot 2018-01-08 at 7.58.38 PM.png

Amanda Bell Artis Jones died 29 October 2006.

Photograph copied from funeral program in the possession of Beulah S. Williams, first cousin to Amanda Jones. 

 

Turner Hines Sr.

Turner Hines (1877-1946).    

On 1 December 1897, Turner Hines, 21, of Gardners township, son of Allen Hines and Frances Mashbourn, married Betsy Bullock, 19, of Gardners township, daughter of Red Batts and Hester Bullock, in Gardners township.

In the 1900 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Turner Hines, 22; wife Betsy, 23; children Ella, 2, and Allen, 3 months; sisters-in-law Rodia Bullock, 17 and Lucille, 5; and half-sister Lillie Marshman, 12.

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Wilson Road, farmer Turner Hines, 33, widower, and children Mary, 11, Allen, 9, Hester, 7, Ash, 6, and Westly, 5, plus sister Lottie, 21.

In 1918, Turner Hines registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 1 July 1896; resided on a rural route near Wilson; farmed for Mrs. W.P. Banks; and was married to Pennie Hines. He signed his card with an X.

In the 1920 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Wilson Road, farmer Turner Hines, 43; wife Penny, 33; and children E. Mary, 21, Allen, 17, Hester, 18, West, 16, W. Jim, 7, Beatrice, 6, Tommie, 4, Rosa, 3, Francie, 2, and T. Lou, 4 months.

In the 1930 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Turner Hines, 51; wife Eliza, 50; and children Beatrice, 17, Tommie, 15, Rosa, 13, Frances, 12, Creasy, 11, Turner Jr., 8, Daisy L., 6, Willie B., 4, and Fred D., 3.

In the 1940 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: farmer Turner Hines, 62, and children Rosetta, 23, Francis, 22, Lucretia, 21, Turner J., 18, Daisey, 17, Willie B., 13, Fred, 11, Freeman, 8, Ederene, 6, and Thelma D., 4.

Turner Hines died 24 September 1946 in Gardners township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was  born 4 July 1877 in Wilson County to unknown parents, and he was buried in the Simon Barnes cemetery. Wesley Hines, East Vance Street, was informant.

Photograph courtesy of Ancestry.com user rogerbarron52.

A pistol duel.

Kinston Daily Free Press, 27 December 1918.

Sherman Bridgers, 21, married Susan Moore, 19, on 25 March 1903 in Saratoga township, Wilson County.

Jesse Price, 23, of Stantonsburg, son of William and Susan Price of Nash County, married Hattie Barnes, 22, of Stantonsburg, daughter of Nelson and Ellen Barnes, on 26 December 1906. Nathan, Sidney and Mittie Locust were witnesses to the ceremony.

In the 1910 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: odd jobs ditcher Sherman Bridgers, 28; wife Susan, 26; and children Rosa L., 6, Willie, 4, Georgiana, 2, and Nathan, 2 months.

In the 1910 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: odd jobs farm laborer Jesse Price, 24, and wife Hattie, 23, and lodger John Floyd, 34, a widower and farm laborer.

On 12 September 1918, Gen. Sherman Bridgers registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 19 March 1882; lived on route 4, Wilson; farmed for I.M. Washington;  and his nearest relative was Willie Bridgers.

The AKAs arrive in Wilson.

“The dream of establishing a graduate chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. in Wilson, NC had its origin in the mind of Soror Norma Darden during the late ‘30’s.  As years passed, she decided to organize a chapter in Wilson. However, this was very difficult since she had to have at least seven members for the establishment of a chapter.  After many years of searching for eligible ladies, her task was completed. On February 18, 1940, Gamma Beta Omega became a reality.”

The first members were Sorors Norma Darden, Dolores Hines, Rosa L. Williams, Vera G. Shade, Peggy Cooper, Marian Davis, and Odelle Barnes (a founder and charter member of Alpha Chi Chapter at North Carolina Central University, formerly North Carolina College, in 1932). Soror Darden served as the first basileus. In 1941 the first members to be initiated into the chapter were Sorors Mae Lord, Cora Washington, and Marian H. Miller.

Adapted from gboaka.com, the website of the Gamma Beta Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

The greatest generation, pt. 3.

Each year the Wilson Daily Times publishes an advertising supplement that honors local veterans on Veterans Day. The insert features photographs submitted to the paper by its readership. This post is the third highlighting African-American soldiers and sailors included in the supplement.

  • Nathaniel Jones, Army, World War II

32892_1821100522_0009-04295.jpg

  • Roma Jones, S.Sgt., Army, World War II

32892_1821100522_0010-02205.jpg

  • Eddie L. Joyner, Army, World War I

32892_1821100522_0012-02538.jpg

  • James Calvin Lewis, Army, 1944-46

32892_2421406264_0030-01440.jpg

  • James Reid, Army, 1942-46

  • Aaron Swinson, Army, 1943

  • William R. White, Sgt., Army, 1941-45

  • Arthur Winstead, Army, World War II

  • Jacelle Winstead, Corp., Army, World War II

The Ques arrive in Wilson.

Nu Alpha Chapter was founded in Wilson, North Carolina, on November 17, 1936. The Chapter was chartered in New Bern on December 5, 1936, with the following officers: Basileus Bro. Boisey O. Barnes (Wilson), Vice Basileus Bro. William Perkins (Tarboro), Keeper of Records and Seal Bro. Aaron Womack (Kinston), Chaplain Bro. D.F. Martinez, Editor to the Oracle Bro. Randolph Armstrong (Rocky Mount), and Keeper of Peace Bro. John Jackson (Goldsboro). The chapter consisted of men from Wilson, Rocky Mount, Tarboro, Greenville, New Bern, Goldsboro, Kinston and surrounding areas. Later, Brothers joined or were initiated from Jacksonville, Elm City, Henderson, Elizabeth City, Beaufort, Plymouth, Scotland Neck and LaGrange. They met monthly on a rotating basis in all the cities represented. (Eventually, as a result of the travel burdens imposed across such a large geographic region, Nu Alpha chartered seven new chapters, including Beta Beta Beta in Wilson in the 1970s.)

Of Nu Alpha’s 61 charter members, these Brothers have been identified as Wilson County residents: B.O. Barnes, John M. Miller, Samuel H. Vick, and Malcolm D. Williams. Over the next twelve years, these men joined the chapter: Spencer J. Satchell (1941), Julian B. Rosemond (1942), Kenneth M. Shade (1945), Charles E. Branford and Ellis Brown (1947), and James C. Ellis and Alvis A. Hines (1948).

Adapted from the website of Nu Alpha chapter, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.