Hines

The obituary of David Hines.

Wilson Daily Times, 14 October 1949.

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On an unstated date in 1915, David Hines, 23, of Green County, N.C., son of Carrie Hines, married Julia A. Best, 23, daughter of Tom and Lizzie Best, at the “Patret Place” [D.W. Patrick’s farm] near Snow Hill, Greene County. 

Toney Hines died 3 April 1917 in Olds township, Greene County. Per his death certificate, he was born 2 April 1917 in Greene County to David Hines of Pamlico County and Julia Ann Best of Greene County; and was buried on the D.W. Patrick farm.

George Washington Hines died 29 June 1919 in Beaver Dam township, Pitt County, N.C. Per his death certificate, he was born 16 June 1919 in Pitt County to David Hines of Pitt County and Julie Best of Greene County; and was buried on the D. Patrick farm.

In the 1930 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer David Hines, 46; wife Julia, 37; daughter Mary E., 9; and lodger Elijah Jones, 20.

In the 1940 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmhand David Hines, 56; wife Julia Anne, 46, cook; daughter Mary Elizabeth, 19; and farmhand Jeana Ionia Mainer, 16, lodger.

David Hines died 11 October 1949 in Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 13 May 1893 in Pamlico County, N.C., to Benjamin Hines and Carrie [maiden name unknown]; was married; worked as a laborer; and lived in Lucama, Wilson County.

Daily Times paperboys, no. 4.

  • Benjamin Hines

Wilson Daily Times, 5 October 1950.

  • Therman G. Barnes

Wilson Daily Times, 7 October 1950.

In the 1950 census of Wilson, Wilson County: cook Maggie L. Ward, 38; cook Ida Mae, 35; sister Annie, 20, maid; sister Addie, 15; brother Vertice B., 14; nephew Thurman Barnes, 14; and nieces Mable Barnes, 18, and Patricia A. Ward, 1.

  • V. Bruce Ward

Wilson Daily Times, 7 October 1950.

Vertice Bruce Ward was the uncle of Therman G. Barnes, above.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

The obituary of Walter Scott Hines, barber and real estate developer.

The obituary of Walter Scott Hines contains unusually detailed information about his career. He and his brother William Hines operated competing barber shops and built rental housing across East Wilson.

Wilson Daily Times, 9 August 1941.

Walter D. Hines presented his father’s will to the clerk of court to file for probate, swearing that he had found the document, drafted in 1924 “among the valuable papers and effects of … Walter S. Hines … within a certain iron safe having a combination lock, which was situated in Walter S. Hines’ home ….”

Wilson Daily Times, 12 August 1941.

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In the 1880 census of Cocoa township, Edgecombe County: Joshua Hines, 52; wife Cally, 47; children Jerry, 20, Deller, 22, Lizer, 17, Joshua, 15, Caliph, 13, William, 11, Robert, 7, and Adline, 4; nephew Allen Harris, 3; and grandson Walter, 1 [Della’s son.]

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: hotel porter Dave Barnes, 40; wife Della; and children Walter, 20, William, 15, Lucy, 13, Dave, 5, and Viola, 11. [Walter, William, and Lucy were, in fact, Hineses and were Della Hines Barnes’ children.]

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Walter Hines, 30; wife Sarah, 29; children Elizabeth, 2, and Walter D., 8 months; and boarder Inez Moore, 31, a school teacher.

In 1918, Walter Scott Hines registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 26 October 1879; lived at 616 Green Street; worked as a barber at Tate & Hines; and his nearest relative was Sarah E. Hines. He was described as tall and slender, with blue eyes and black hair.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Walter Hines, 40, wife Sara, 37, Elizabeth, 11, Walter Jr., 10, and Carl, 5.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: barber Walter Hines, 50, wife Sarah, 48, and children Elizabeth, 21, Walter, 20, Carl W., 16, and Clifton R., 7.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Walter S. Hines, 60; wife Sarah E., 58; son Carl W., 24, teacher; son’s wife Ruth, 23, teacher; and son Ray W., 17.

Walter Scott Hines died 9 July 1941 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 24 October 1879 in Edgecombe County, N.C., to Walter S. Parker and Della Hines; and lived at 617 East Green Street, Wilson. His brother, Dr. B.O. Barnes, was the certifying physician.

Clippings courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Memories of William Hines.

I wrote here of the memoir of long-time Darden High School principal Edward M. Barnes. At the time, I believed the pink booklet to be a one-off tribute published by Darden High School Alumni Association. However, on a recent visit to Sallie B. Howard School, I was introduced to an entire library of these works spanning multiple literary genres — written, edited, and published in the 1980s and ’90s by Mrs. Howard for use in the Youth Enrichment Program.

I was particularly interested in this booklet, and Dr. JoAnne Woodard generously offered me a copy. William Hines seems scarcely remembered now, but was for nearly three-quarters of the twentieth century arguably Wilson’s most civically engaged African-American citizen.

The booklet is organized in a series of Mrs. Howard’s recollections. William Hines was her family’s landlord, and her earliest memories involve the house at 1011 Washington Street.

“… [W]hen we moved into his tenant house in 1935 or ’36, it was the first house we had ever lived in with electricity and an ‘inside’ toilet! We felt extremely fortunate as many of Wilson’s tenant houses did not have such accommodations.”

“How well I remember this neat little four-room house …. It sat so near the sidewalk there was hardly room to frow flowers in the front. In fact, the front porch steps were practically on the sidewalk itself! This, however, was not unusual as many houses were similarly situated during that time. I suppose the rationale of the builders was to leave room in the back so that the residents could plant gardens if they so desired. And in those lean days — nearly everyone desired!”  

“Mr. Hines owned many houses all over Wilson. He also owned his own barber shop where he employed as many as 12 barbers. The house we lived in sat right across the street from others who also owned their own homes. I remember my mother being highly impressed by the green striped awnings of some of these homeowner neighbors. Each summer they would lower these pretty awnings in order to shade their front porches. …”

“I also remember Mr. Hines as one of the donors of cash awards to students who excelled in various subjects at Darden High. Money was hard to come by in those days, and I for one worked hard to capture one of these cash prizes.”

“About 1942, I was a patient at Mercy Hospital on E. Green St. It was said that Mr. Hines was one of the persons who secured the funds from the Duke Endowment for the operations of this hospital. He was the Administrator at the time I was a patient. Practically every morning he would come into the war and say a little something to the patients.”

” … my high school days were filled with priceless memories: the parties, the basketball games held in heatless warehouses (I don’t remember feeling cold!); the football games played in the snow and slush in back of Darden High (I don’t remember feeling cold!); the Junior-Senior proms held on the 3rd floor of the old Vick casino (walk up!); the many concerts and dramas given by our school etc. …”

“Mr. Hines was one of the founders of the Men’s Civic Club. And it was this distinguished group of men who finally succeeded in getting a recreational facility for our community. Today, this facility is known as the Reid Street Center. Now the Black Community had a brand new place in which to house their various activities. How well I remember the Big Bands that played in our new facility. …”

William and Ethel Cornwell Hines in photo reproduced from booklet.

Town turns down request for recreation funding.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 September 1937.

The path to building Reid Street Community Center was a rocky one. As reported in September 1937, African-American community leaders, headed by William Hines, appeared repeatedly before Wilson’s Board of Aldermen (the precursor to City Council) seeking help.  To match federal funds, the group requested $7500 to add to another $7500 they hoped to receive from the county. When the county declined to approve the funds, the group returned to the city to ask for the $7500 outright to build a scaled-down building. “The request was voted down by the Aldermen last night on the grounds that the appropriation the town had made was contingent on the county’s appropriation and that there seemed to be some doubt anyway whether the town even could appropriate the money.”

The Center was finally funded in the spring of 1938 and opened at the end of the year.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Tributes to Dr. L.V. Grady.

Wilson Daily Times, 22 February 1936.

After faltering in the 1920s, Wilson’s Black hospital reorganized and reopened as non-profit Mercy Hospital in 1930. Carolina General Hospital’s Dr. Leland V. Grady was instrumental in guiding Mercy’s administrators through the hospital’s earliest years, and William Hines and Camillus L. Darden penned tributes to him at his death.

1009 and 1011 Washington Street.

The one hundred-fifty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, 1009 Atlantic is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; shotgun with strong bungalow traits, including gable-end porch and shingle-shake gable; built as tenant housing by William Hines.”

1011 Atlantic is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; shotgun with strong bungalow traits; similar originally to #1011; also built Hines for tenants.”

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  • 1009

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C.: Bell James T (c; Pennie) barber Cherry Hotel Shop h 1009 Washington

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C.: Wright Mary (c) lndrs h 1009 Washington; also Wright Preston (c) h 1009 Washington

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1009 Washington, paying $6/month rent, Beatrice Ruffin, 25, tobacco factory stemmer; and, paying $12/month, Thomas Evans, 26, water department employee, Town of Wilson; wife Maggie, 27, tobacco factory stemmer; son Richard, 6; Coy Evans, 22, tobacco factory laborer, and James Evans, 20, farm laborer.

In 1940, Thomas Evans registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 24 April 1914 in Wilson; his contact was wife Maggie Evans; and he worked for the Town of Wilson.

In 1940, James Arthur Evans registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 24 July 1919 in Wilson County; lived at 1009 Washington Street; his contact was brother Thomas Evans Jr., 1009 Washington; and he worked for Josh Bryant, Route 2, Elm City, N.C.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Evans Thos (c; Maggie) lab h 1009 Washington

  • 1011

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C.: Floyd Ambrose (c; Mattie) drayman h 1011 Washington

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C.: Floyd Ambrose (c; Mattie) truck driver h 1011 Washington

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1009 Washington, rented for $17/month, taxi chauffeur Ambrose Floyd, 28; wife Mattie, 28; and children William A., 9, James, 8, Mateel, 6, Earnesteen, 5, and Hattie M., 1; and sister-in-law Hattie McLoran, 29, cook.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1011 Washington, Nathan Townsend, 43, born in Maxton, truck driver for retail coal company, and wife Narcissus, 44, born in Kenly, private cook.

In 1942, Nathan Townsend registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 15 July 1897 in Robeson County, N.C.; lived at 1011 East Washington; his contact was mother Sarah Townsend, Wagram, N.C.; and he worked for Bardin Coal Company, 701 Mercer Street, Wilson.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Townsend Nathan (c) driver Bardin Coal h 1011 Washington

Studio shots, no. 190: Willie B. Hines.

Willie Benjamin Hines (1927-1990).

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In the 1930 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Turner Hines, 51; wife Eliza, 50; and children Beatrice, 17, Tommie, 15, Rosa, 13, Frances, 12, Creasy, 11, Turner Jr., 8, Daisy L., 6, Willie B., 4, and Fred D., 3.

In the 1940 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: farmer Turner Hines, 62, and children Rosetta, 23, Francis, 22, Lucretia, 21, Turner J., 18, Daisey, 17, Willie B., 13, Fred, 11, Freeman, 8, Ederene, 6, and Thelma D., 4.

In 1945, Willie Benjamin Hines registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration, he was born 17 February 1927 in Wilson County; lived at Route 4, Box 184, Wilson; his contact was father Turner Hines, 1001 East Vance Street, Wilson; and he worked for [brother-in-law] George Powell, Route 4, Box 184.

Photo courtesy of Roger Barron.

300 North Reid Street.

The one hundred-forty-fourth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; Jesse Knight house; popular bungalow design with gable roof and engaged porch; shed dormer; Knight was a porter at the Cherry Hotel in Wilson.”

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In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hines Ashley (c; Margaret) driver h 300 N Reid

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hines Ashley (c; Margaret) truck driver h 300 N Reid

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 300 Reid, rented for $20/month, Ash Hines, 36, tobacco factory laborer; wife Margrette, 37, public school teacher; and son Albert, 11.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 300 Reid, owned and valued at $2000, Jessie Knight, 38, cook, and wife Lessie, 42, maid. 

In 1942, Jesse Knight registered for the World War II draft. Per his registration card, he was born 15 March 1902 in Edgecombe County, N.C.; lived at 300 North Reid Street; his contact was Rodda McMillan, 103 South Vick Street; and he worked for J.T. Barnes.

Wilson Daily Times, 13 December 1946.

Jesse Knight died 28 January 1952 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 52 years old; was born in Edgecombe County to John Knight and Sallie Batts; lived at 300 North Reid; worked as a laborer; and was married to Lessie Knight.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2021.