1930s

A classroom.

Classroom

This photograph depicts a classroom at Colored Graded School (later known as the Sallie Barbour School) on what was then Stantonsburg Street. The children appear to represent several grades, but only two have been identified. Roderick Taylor Jr. (born 1928) is at center, in front of the hand-drawn North Carolina state flag. Lucian J. Henderson (1926-2003) is third from right, behind the model house. The occasion and the photographer are unknown.

Photograph from the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks, now in the possession of Lisa Y. Henderson.

It wasn’t me.

Wilson Daily Times, 21 September 1928.

In which a number of worthy colored men make haste to reassure the public of their continued respectability.

  • Henry Gaston — in the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 508 Woodard, Henry Gaston, 42, laborer; wife Dora, 38; and stepdaughter Josephine Whitaker, 14.
  • Henry Golston
  • Herbert Ricks — in the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1007 Carolina Street, cafe proprietor Herbert Ricks, 27; wife Goldie, 30, private family cook; and daughter Gloria H., 4.

Alice Bryant Gay.

Wilson Daily Times, 25 October 1938.

Sam Gay, son of Amos Thigpen and Harriet Gay, married Alice Bryant, daughter of Louisa Bryant, on 10 February 1870 in Wilson. P.E. Hines performed the ceremony.

In the 1870 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Samuel Gay, 24, wife Alice, 20, and brother Albert, 21.

In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farm worker Samuel Gay, 27, wife Allice, 25, and children Blanch, 8, Louizah, 7, Edgar, 4, Charlie, 3, and Mamie, 1 month.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer Sam Gay, 54; wife Alice, 50; and children Charlie C., 23, Edgar B., 25, Lucy, 17, Samuel, 14, Albert and Beatrice, 10, and Lily, 4.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Samuel Gay, 65, wife Alice, 55, and children Albert, 20, and Lilly, 15.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: widow Alice Gay, 45; daughter Beatrice, 26; grandson Jerome Wood, 11; granddaughter Gereddine, 10; son Albert, 30; daughter-in-law Anabell, 24; grandsons Albert Jr., 4, and Jesse, 2; son-in-law Fredrick Bolling, 35; daughter Lillie, 23; and grandchildren Delma, 4, and Fredrick, 2.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 623 Green, widow Annie B. Gay, 30, a laundress; husband Albert, 40, a bellboy; mother-in-law Alic, 73; and children Albert Jr., 14, Jessie, 11, Hal, 8, Samual, 6, Mirrian, 4, and Ralph, 2.

Alice Bryant Gay died 24 October 1938 in Wilson. Per her death certificate: she was born 1 January 1854 in Wilson County to Lousie Bryant of Goldsboro, North Carolina; was a widow; and resided at 402 North Reid Street, Wilson. Lucy Lewis of Newark, New Jersey, was informant.

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The Saint John deacon board.

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Wilson Daily Times, 2 July 1976.

On the basis of Charles S. Thomas’ inclusion in this photograph, I would date it no later than mid-1937, not the early 1940s.

Almus A. Lovette.

aalovette

Wilson Daily Times, 5 November 1938.

In the 1880 census of Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia: at 518 West Broad, laborer Green Lovett, 28; wife Julia, 30; and children Almus, 5, Mary, 3, and Floyd, 1.

In the 1900 census of Chesapeake District, Elizabeth County, Virginia: at Hampton Normal & Agricultural Institute, Almus A. Lovett, 25, student, born in Georgia.

1897

Third-Year Trade School Students, Catalogue of Hampton Normal & Agricultural Institute, Hampton, Virginia 1902-1903.

Lovette appears in Savannah city directories between 1904 and 1913 at various addresses and working as blacksmith, post office carrier, and driver. [Which begs the question of which years he taught in Greensboro.]

On 6 July 1908, Almus A. Lovett and Letitia H. Jones, both 33, were married in Savannah, Georgia.

Almus Ashton Lovette registered for the World War I draft in Wilson on 12 September 1918. Per his registration card, he resided at 415 Stantonsburg Street; was born 8 April 1876; worked as a horseshoer for G.T. Purvis, 212 Tarboro Street; and his nearest relative was Letitia H. Lovette.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Almus Lovett, 42, blacksmith in shop, and wife Letitia, 43, seamstress.

In the 1930 Wilson city directory: Lovett Almus A (c) (Letitia H) horseshoer Stallings & Riley h 301 N. Vick.

Almus Ashton Lovett died 5 November 1938 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 7 April 1877 in Sylvania, Georgia to Green Lovett; resided at 301 North Vick Street; was married to Letitia Lovett; and worked as a blacksmith at a repair ship. Letitia Lovett was informant.

On 2 February 1941, Letitia H. Lovett, 57, daughter of Frank and Sarah Jones, married Edwin D. Fisher, 47, son of Edwin W. and Nannie D. Fisher, at Lovett’s home. Baptist minister Fred M. Davis performed the service in the presence of Milton W. Fisher, Mrs. Almina Fisher, Mrs. Rosa E. McCullers, and Mrs. Eva L. Brown.

Letitia Lovette Fisher died 1 November 1969 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 10 January 1876 in Georgia to Franklin Jones and an unknown mother; had worked as a teacher and seamstress; resided at 301 North Vick; and was married to Edwin D. Fisher, who served as informant.

 

Voyage to Havana.

On 20 August 1937, Camillus and Norma Duncan Darden boarded the S.S. Cuba at Havana, Cuba, for a one-day return to the United States arriving in Tampa, Florida, on the 21st. The Peninsular & Occidental Steamship Company operated the Cuba.

U.S. Citizen Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Tampa, Florida, digitized at Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787 – 2004 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

 

Community Chest drive.

community chest

Wilson Daily Times, 10 November 1933. 

  • North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company
  • Community Chest
  • Rev. C.H. Richmond — C.H. Richmond was a Presbyterian minister.
  • C.S. Thomas — Charles S. Thomas (1878-1937), an insurance agent, was a native of Bennettsville, South Carolina.
  • Dr. W.A. Mitchner — William Arthur Mitchner.
  • William Hines
  • Levi Jones — Levi Hunter Jones.
  • John H. Clark — John Henry Clark.
  • Walter Hines — Walter Scott Hines.
  • Rev. B.F. Jordan — B.F. Jordan was a Missionary Baptist minister.
  • Dr. G.K. Butterfield — George Kenneth Butterfield.
  • Dr. Z.M. Johnson — Bertie County, North Carolina, native Zebulon Myer Johnson (1873-1934) was a chiropodist.
  • G.J. Faison
  • Loyd Thomas — Brickmason Lloyd Cheatam Thomas (1890-1968) was a native of Forest, Virginia.
  • Daniel Vick — Known as “Bud,” Daniel Leon (or Lionel) Vick (1898-1975) was a son of Samuel and Annie Washington Vick.
  • A.A. Lovette — Blacksmith Almus Ashton Lovette (1877-1938) was a native of Sylvania, Georgia.
  • James Crockett — James Crockett (1868-1935) was a native of Goldsboro, North Carolina. He was the brother of Georgia Crockett Aiken Thomas.
  • Andrew Townsend — Person County native Andrew Townsend (1881-1960) worked as a laborer.
  • Washington Wilkins — Washington Wilkins (1894-1958) was a plumber and laborer for the city. He was the son of Richmond and Patsy Armstrong Wilkins.
  • Rev. R.A. Horton
  • Golden Robinson — Golden Robinson (1897-1948) was the nephew of Alfred Robinson and a native of Wilmington, North Carolina.
  • James E. Stokes — Probably James Stokes (born circa 1895), who worked as a barber.
  • Ed Humphrey — James Edward Humphrey (1874-1936) was a carpenter.
  • Dr. B.O. Barnes — Boisey Otha Barnes.
  • N.A. Pierce — Nazareth Andrew Pierce.
  • S.H. Vick — Samuel Hines Vick.
  • C.E. Artis — Columbus Estelle Artis.
  • L.A. Moore — Lee Andrew Moore.
  • Rev. I.A. Moore
  • John M. Barnes — John Mack Barnes.
  • Prof. Edward Barnes — Edward Morrison Barnes.
  • Prof. Johnson
  • J.J. Langley — Jarrett Judge Langley (1878-1967) was a grocer.
  • O.N. Freeman — Oliver Nestus Freeman.
  • Wesley Rogers — John Wesley Rogers.
  • H.C. Brower
  • Clarence McCullers — Clarence McCullers (1885-1945) was a Johnston County, North Carolina, native.
  • George White — Either George Washington White (1877-1939), a city boiler operator, or George C. White (1901-1945), a cook and native of Franklin County, North Carolina.
  • Robert Haskins — Robert Douglas Haskins.
  • George Hagins — Possibly, George Hagans (1900-1978), a farmer.
  • Clarence Best — Clarence Benjamin Best.
  • Roderick Taylor
  • Wm. Barnes
  • John Battle — Probably John Parker Battle (1890-1945).
  • Prof. H.M. Fitts — Howard Monroe Fitts.
  • Rev. H.E. Edward
  • James Whitfield — James Ashley Whitfield.
  • E.W. Fisher — Virginia native Edwin W. Fisher (1873-??) was a district manager for North Carolina Mutual.
  • Dr. I.A. Shade — Isaac Albert Shade.
  • Rev. J.S. Jackson — Joseph Sylvester Jackson Sr. (1870-1942) was a Granville County, North Carolina, native.
  • Dr. J.F. Cowan — Physician Joseph Franklin Cowan (1901-1985) was a native of Abbeville, South Carolina.
  • Rev. Fred Davis — Fred Marshon Davis.
  • Levi Arrington — Levi V. Arrington (1887-1964), carpenter, was a native of Nash County, North Carolina.
  • J.H. Knight — James Henry Knight (1886-1951), was a grocery merchant.
  • Dr. S.H. Vick — is this a duplicate entry for Samuel H. Vick?
  • J.H. Cook
  • W.M. Bethel — Wilton Maxwell Bethel.
  • Ash Hines — Ashley Hines (1895-??) was a laborer.
  • A.J. McCoy — Probably Alfred McCoy (1874-1953), a laborer employed by the city of Wilson and a native of Edgecombe County.
  • A.N. Neil — Austin N. Neal.
  • Rev. Eddie Cox — Wayne County, North Carolina, native Eddie Harrison Cox was probably a Baptist minister.
  • Clinton Best — Bricklayer Clinton Bess (1885-??) was the son of Noah and Sarah Bess.
  • Edgar Diggs — Barber Edgar Hiram Diggs (1891-1970) was a Wayne County native.
  • Walter Whitted — Walter Craig Whitted.
  • C.L. Darden — Camillus Lewis Darden.

 

No justice for Lee Locus.

On March 31, 1939, farmer LeviLee” Locus was shot to death by a policeman in his own bedroom in Oldfields township, Wilson County. Though the outcome of the officer’s trial was predictable, newspapers called for justice, and black folk took some satisfaction in watching Chief T.T. Autry brought to trial.

4 7 1939

Burlington Daily Times-News, 7 April 1939.

5 27 1939

Pittsburgh Courier, 27 May 1939.

12 23 1939

Pittsburgh Courier, 23 December 1939.

——

In the 1910 census of Oldfields township, Wilson County: farmer John Locus, 37; wife Annie, 31; and children Flonnie, 9, Floid, 8, and Levy, 3.

In the 1920 census of Oldfields township, Wilson County: farmer John Locus, 43; wife Annie, 39; and children Floid, 17, Levi, 14, and Wiley, 4.

On 23 September 1922, Levi Locus, 21, of Simms, son of John and Annie Locus, married Lilly Jones, 18, of Bailey, daughter of Jesse and Sallie Jones, in Wilson. Witnesses were Eli Barnes, of Simms, and Ernest Batts and Fenley Davis of Bailey.

In the 1930 census of Oldfields, township, Wilson County: farmer Leevie Locus, 23; wife Lillie, 23; and children Lillie M., 7, Leevie Jr., 6, Johnnie B., 5, Freddie L., 3, Annie R., 1, and Queen E., 3 months.

S123_1195-0939

Denied: too old.

Documents from the pension application file of Lizzie Woodard, daughter of Union army veteran London Woodard of Wilson County:

On 22 August 1933, Lizzie Woodard of 119 Ashe Street, Wilson, filed a Declaration for Pension for Children Under Sixteen Years of Age, claiming benefits for herself and her sister Mamie Woodard as children of London Woodard. The declaration noted that London Woodard enlisted 10 July 1861 at Wilson, North Carolina, in the “Col. Army.” London was not wounded in service and was discharged 11 November 1865. He died 10 February 1931. Lizzie Woodard was 37 years old; her sister, 35. Their mother, Grace Woodard, had been London’s second wife when they married 30 November 1886. The first, whom he married in 1874, died without issue. Paul Bunch of Black Creek and Martha Allen of Wilson witnessed Lizzie’s signature.

lw3

Unfortunately, in January 1934, the Pension Authority summarily rejected the Woodards’ application “on the ground that the children of the alleged soldier were over 16 years of age at the date of his death.”

Screen Shot 2017-05-14 at 11.12.27 PM

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This was not Elder London Woodard, who founded London’s Primitive Baptist Church. Rather, this was his grandson London, son of Howell and Rhoda Woodard.

In the 1870 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farm laborer Howell Woodard, 52; wife Rodah, 40; and children London, 23, Harriet, 20, Venus, 19, Ferebee, 17, Virginia, 17, Mary, 14, Sarah, 13, Penelope, 12, Rodah, 10, Puss, 6, John, 8, Kenny, 5, Fanny, 1, and Martha, 1 month.

In 22 November 1877, London Woodard, 30, married Margaret Guest, 24, at Richard Haggans’ house. G.T. Daniel, Ned Barnes and Jim Bynum witnessed.

In the 1880 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: London Woodard, 34; wife Margaret, 26; and children James G., 9, and Alley, 7. (The children were likely Margaret’s from a previous relationship.)

On 27 November 1895, London Woodard, 47, married Nancy Webb, 23, in Gardners township at the bride’s parents’ home. Adella E. Barnes, Jane R. Farmer and Martha Woodard witnessed.

In the 1900 census of Town of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer London Woodard, age unknown; wife Nancy, 28; children Lizzie, 3, and Mamie, 1; brother-in-law Joseph Webb, 17, and sister-in-law Rhodie Webb, 13.

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer London Woodard, 62, divorced.

Nancy, however, did not report their divorce to the enumerator. In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Nancy Woodard, 33, widow, and children Lizzie, 14, Mamie, 11, Hubbard, 4, and David, 2. (Apparently, “Hubbard” — in fact, Herbert — and David were not London’s children, as they were not parties to the pension application.)

Though she applied for benefits using her maiden name, Lizzie Woodard, 20, daughter of Lum and Nancy Woodard, married Dock Barnes, 24, son of Rhodes and Frances Barnes, in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, on 1 November 1913.

In the 1920 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer London Woodard, 75, widower.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Lipscomb Road, wagon factory laborer James Barnes, 29; wife Lizzie, 23; children Estelle, 11, and Lenard, 5; sister-in-law Mamie Woodard, 21; and boarders John Hollins, 22, Rose Barnes, 18, Pete Barnes, 19, and Tom Outlaw, 21.

Mamie Woodard, 29, married Thomas Outlaw, 29, on 19 November 1929. Witnesses were W.I. Barnes, John A. Barnes Jr., and Elisha L. Webb.

Lizzie Woodard Barnes died 26 November 1959 in Wilson.

Mamie Woodard Outlaw died 28 December 1988 in Beaufort, Washington County, North Carolina.

File #1,734,955, Application of Lizzie Woodard et al. for Children’s Pension, National Archives and Records Administration.