Entertainment

Burch Williams’ Golden Follies at Lincoln Theatre.

Wilson Daily Times, 16 March 1928.

The Lincoln Theatre, a theatre catering to African-American audiences, operated in the late 1920s and early 1930s at 417 East Nash Street. Greek immigrant George C. Woller was the theatre’s proprietor. Burch Williams’ Golden Follies were a Black act, but white audiences could buy tickets for a special midnight show at another Greek-owned establishment, the European Cafe.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Boxing tomorrow nite!

Wilson Daily Times, 7 March 1928.

For Chapel Hill, N.C.-native Addison “Kayo” Warren and Joe “Biff” Bennett’s ten-round boxing match at Wilson’s Farmers Warehouse, African-American fans could purchase tickets for seats in the “section reserved for colored people.” McNeil’s Barber Shop was likely a business operated by barber Angus A. McNeill and John Hargrove at 420 1/2 East Nash Street.

Machine operator at the moving picture theatre.

When Hood Vick registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County in 1917, he listed his occupation as “machine operator moving picture theatre” and C.L. Jones as his employer. The theatre was the Globe, which operated on the second floor of the Odd Fellows building. Samuel H. Vick is credited as its founder, but in the 1916 Wilson city directory, Charles Jones is listed as the Globe‘s proprietor.

Rev. and Mrs. Hilliard welcomed to Saint John.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 January 1942.

William A. Hilliard’s World War II draft registration card, filed in Wilson County in 1942. Rev. Hilliard left Wilson in 1948 to assume the pastorate Saint Paul A.M.E. Zion Church.

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Bishop William Alexander Hilliard (1904-2008).

“Bishop William Alexander Hilliard, 103, retired bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, died March 13. He was reported to be the oldest living bishop in all of Methodism. The funeral was scheduled for March 22 at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Detroit. Born in 1904 in Greenville, Texas, and educated in Kansas City, Mo., Hilliard received his higher education at Western University and Wayne State University. He was married for 71 years to Edra Mae Hilliard, who died in 1998. Called to the ministry in 1922, Hilliard was ordained a deacon in 1924 and an elder in 1927. He was pastor at more than nine different churches before becoming pastor at St. Paul A.M.E. Zion Church in Detroit. He was elected in 1960 as the 67th bishop in the AME Zion Church and retired from the episcopacy in 1980.” [Obituary unattributed, 21 March 2008]

Jet magazine, 20 October 1977.

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