Entertainment

Recommended reading, no. 2.

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A project of North Carolina Arts Council and local partners, African American Music Trails of Eastern North Carolina (2013) is a 218-page insider’s guide to the music traditions of an eight-county region. Drawn largely from interviews with living musicians and interspersed with vivid photographs and up-close vignettes, the book devotes thirty pages to Wilson County’s rich musical history, both sacred and secular.  Highlights include the role of Reid Street Community Center (and tobacco warehouses) as music venues, shape note singing and hymn lining, and influential music teachers. The book suggests travel routes for each section and includes a 17-track CD of eastern North Carolina recordings.

The negro girl-preacher.

Remarkable.

The negro girl-preacher, Cleretto Nora Avery, who has created so much interest in the city, left Monday. The crowds she attracted to her discourses were large — many white people attending Friday afternoon she preached to a large congregation in the white Methodist church here, and her sermon on that occasion elicited many favorable comments. She is a mulatto, claiming to be only eleven years old, yet can read fluently and speaks to her large audiences with no hesitation. Her father was a preacher and she claims that his mantle of inspiration has fallen upon her.

Wilson Times, 30 July 1897.

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Cleveland Gazette, 20 March 1897.

The best people buy the best pianos.

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In the very long “partial list of Ivers & Pond purchasers”:

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Charlotte Daily Observer, 15 August 1909.

  • A.J.C. Moore — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: retail grocer Andrew Moore, 51, wife Robetta, 39, and children Evyln, 17, Omia, 16, and Willie, 1. Moore also worked as a teacher.
  • Clarissa Williams

Theatrical jottings.

Samuel H. Vick‘s Globe Theatre was the first black-owned moving picture theatre in Wilson. As early as 1914, the Globe occupied the second floor of the Odd Fellows Hall at 549-551 Nash Street and, in its earliest days, under the management of J.J. Privett, also hosted vaudeville acts.

Here, from the New York Age‘s weekly “Theatrical Jottings” column in 1914 are announcements of the Globe’s offerings:

1 22

22 January.

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29 January.

2 12

12 February.

3 19

19 March.

3 26

26 March.

9 17

17 September.

9 24

24 September.

A teenaged Ethel Waters joined the Hill Sisters act when it passed through Philadelphia and, on the road with them, gained the sobriquet “Sweet Mama Stringbean.” See Cullen et al.’s Vaudeville Old and New: An Encyclopedia of Variety Performances in America, volume 1.

The finest game of ball ever played.

Today is opening day of Major League Baseball’s 2016 season. In keeping:

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Wilson Mirror, 20 July 1892.

8 8 1894

Wilson Mirror, 8 August 1894.

6 19 1896

Wilson Times, 19 June 1896.

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Wilmington Morning Star, 8 May 1904.

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Raleigh News & Observer, 30 April 1910.

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Wilson Times, 3 May 1910.

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Wilson Times, 6 May 1910.

5 2 1911

Wilson Times, 2 May 1911.