Lipscomb

Snaps, no. 73: Jake Mitchell.

Jane Cooke Hawthorne shared these beautiful images of Jake Mitchell shot by her father, dentist (and photographer) Charles Cooke, in 1973. Mitchell was houseman and later chauffeur to generations of tobacconist Howell G. Whitehead III’s family.

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In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: George Mitchel, 23, day laborer; wife Rosa, 23; and children William, 2, and George, 1.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer George Mitchell, 29; wife Rosa, 30; and children George, 11, Bunyan, 9, Frank L., 5, Albert and Alton, 3, and Rosa, 1.

On 8 November 1922, Jake Mitchell, 21, son of George and Rosa Mitchell, married Mandy Lucus, 19, daughter of Wyatt and Elizabeth Lucus, in Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister Jeremiah Scarboro performed the ceremony “on Daniel Hill” in the presence of Della Smith, George Thorne and James Blake.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Jake Mitchell, 27, farmer; wife Manda, 28; and children Jake T., 3, and Jewell D. [Geraldine], 1.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 410 Warren Street, W.P.A. cement finisher Jake Mitchel, 38; wife Mamie, 39, cook; and children Jake, 13, Jeraldine, 11, and Edna Gray, 9.

In 1942, Jake Mitchell registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 12 October 1903 in Wilson; lived at 410 Warren Street, Wilson; his contact was George Mitchell, Finch Street; and he worked for tobacco dealer H.G. Whitehead at 505 West Nash Street.

Both Jake and Amanda Locus Mitchell worked in the Whitehead household. In 1953, Nolia G. and Howell G. Whitehead transferred to the Mitchells a house and lot at 810 West Walnut Street, in Daniel Hill.

Wilson Daily Times, 1 October 1953.

Three years later, realtor George T. Stronach Jr. and his wife Nancy C. sold the Mitchells a lot on Queen Street, in East Wilson.

Wilson Daily Times, 12 December 1956.

The following spring, Jake Mitchell secured a building permit to erect a five-room brick house on the Queen Street lot.

Wilson Daily Times, 11 March 1957.

Rosa Mitchell died 6 April 1959 at 335 Finch Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 16 May 1883  in Wilson County to Stephen Lipkins [Lipscomb] and Mariah (last name unknown) and was a widow. Jake Mitchell was informant.

in 1960, under the terms of Nola Gardner Whitehead’s will, Jake and Mandy Mitchell received bequests of $500 each as well as a 1950 Buick.

Wilson Daily Times, 2 March 1960.

Jake Mitchell died 8 June 1975 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 12 October 1900 to George Mitchell and Rosa Libson [Lipscomb]; was married to Amanda Locus; lived at 1305 Queen Street; and was a chauffeur.

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Jake Mitchell reminisced about running dogs for P.L. Woodard, merchant and president of Contentnea Guano Company.

Many thanks to Jane Cooke Hawthorne!

Architect Lipscomb’s entry into the slaveholding class.

From the entry “Oswald Lipscomb (1826-1891),” North Carolina Architects and Builders: A Biographical Dictionary:

“Oswald Lipscomb (July 26, 1826-Feb. 3, 1891) was a carpenter from Virginia who came to North Carolina as a young man and became a leading builder in the newly chartered railroad town of Wilson, specializing in the picturesque residential styles popular in the mid-19th century.

“Lipscomb soon established himself as a successful citizen. He married well, wedding in 1855 Penelope Rountree, daughter of a prominent and wealthy merchant, and they had two children, James and Penelope, before the mother died. Their son James went to live for a time with his uncle, James Rountree, and like his uncle became involved in the local textile industry. In 1860 Oswald Lipscomb, aged 34, headed a household that included only himself and 8-year-old Penelope. Though a carpenter by trade, he had moved into the land and slaveholding class and identified himself as a farmer, with his real estate valued at $5,000: between 1855 and 1858 Lipscomb had bought several town lots and a 345-acre farm. His personal property was valued at $17,960, much of which represented his ownership of 9 slaves, including 5 men ranging from 20 to 71 years of age, a woman of 17, and three children. By 1861, he sold his real estate including the farm for over $10,000; he may have sold his slaves as well.”

The obituary of Mariah Lipscomb.

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Wilson Daily Times, 8 December 1924.

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In the 1870 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: carpenter Stephen Lipscomb, 49; wife Mariah, 29; and children Anna, 13, Tilitha, 12, Betha, 12, Frank, 10, Archibald, 8, Penny, 6, and Daniel, 1 month.

In the 1880 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Stephen Lipscum, 52; wife Mariah, 42; children Penny, 13, Daniel and Louvenia, 9, Mary, 5, Rosa, 4, and George, 3 months; and grandchildren Isabella, 7, James, 5, and Henryetta, 2.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer George Hines, 53; wife Lew, 48; children Howard, 19, Hubbard, 17, May Lillie, 12, Joseph, 10, Nora, 8, Robert, 5, William, 4, and Charlie, 2; and widowed mother-in-law Mariah Lipscombe, 72.

Lou Lipscombe Hines applied for a Social Security number or claim in May 1937. Per her application, she was born 6 May 1868 in Wilson, North Carolina, to Stephen Lipscombe and Maria Barnes.

Frank Lipscomb died 5 October 1941 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 80 years old; resided at Wilson County Home; was a widower; was a farmer; and was born in Wilson County to Stephen and Mariah Lipscomb. Johnnie Coley was informant.