Lassiter

Rachel Lassiter provides for her daughter.

Deed Book 1, page 657. Wilson County Register of Deeds Office, Wilson.

This Indenture made this the 27th day of decr 1860 one thousand eight hundred & sixty between Rachel Lassiter of the county of Wilson & State of North Carolina of the first part & Matthew Lassiter of the county & state aforesaid of second part witnessed: That the said party of the first part for & in consideration of the sum of ten Dollars to her in hand paid by the said Matthew Lassiter for the [illegible] & [illegible] the trust, hereinafter mentioned at & before the sealing & delivery hereof the receipt whereof he does hereby acknowledge have given, granted, bargained & sold & by these presents doth grant, bargain sell & convey unto the said Matthew Lassiter his heirs & assigns forever all my personal property including her whole estate say 3 head of Cattle one bed & furniture household & Kitchen furniture & about eighty dollars in bonds or notes to have & to hold unto the said Matthew Lassiter his heirs & assigns & for the following & none other that is to say for the sole & separate use of my child Zelphia Lassiter & any other heirs I may hereafter have & the issues & profits thereof shall be for their use & benefit. In testimony whereof I hereunto set my hand & seal this 27th day of Dcr 1860    Rachel X Lassiter  Matthew X Lassiter

——

In the 1850 census of Edgecombe County: Hardy Laster, 73, wife Beady, 54, and children Mathew, 26, Silas, 26, Green, 25, Hardy, 21, and Rachel, 20; all described as mulatto. Hardy reported owning $650 of real property.

In the 1860 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Green Lassiter, 36; [his wife] Mary, 24; [and his siblings] Matthew, 37; and Rachel Lassiter, 30. [Where was Zilpha?]

On 29 December 1860, Rachael Lassiter married Daniell [actually, David] Read in Wilson County.

This marriage surely precipitated the transfer of Rachel Lassiter’s assets to her brother Matthew Lassiter three days prior. David Reid was a widower with children. When Rachel Lassiter married, her personal property would in effect become her husband’s property. In order to preserve her assets for her own daughter’s benefit, Rachel Lassiter sold everything she had to Matthew Lassiter in trust for Zelphia Lassiter. 

In the 1870 census of Otter Creek township, Edgecombe County, N.C.: farm laborer David Reid, 58; wife Rachel, 40; and children Gustin E., 18, Nancy A., 16, and Zylpha, 17.

I have not found anything further about Rachel Lassiter Reid or Zelphia Lassiter, alias Reid, but note that David Reid’s 1910 estate papers do not list either of them.

[Update, 16 March 2022: Bernard Patterson, a descendant of Rachel Lassiter’s sister Penelope Lassiter Woodard, immediately went looking for Zilphia Lassiter and found this: on 23 March 1876, Amandiburt Mills, 30, married Sylphy Lassiter, 22, in No. 9 township, Edgecombe County. 

With that information, I found: in the 1880 census of Roxabel township, Bertie County, N.C.: Mandaburt Mills, 35; wife Zilpha A., 25; and son Thadius, 12; plus servant Francis Clark, 18.

in the Death Register of Greensville County, Virginia: Zilphia Mills died 15 March 1892 of dropsy She was reported as 25 years of age; was born in Wilson, N.C., to Rachel Lussiter; and was married to M.B. Mills. In the 1900 census of Belfield township, Greensville County: Mandyburt Mills, 53, widower, farmer.] 

Wilson County, North Carolina County Marriages 1762-1979, http://www.familysearch.org.

L. Henry and Elizabeth Lassiter Daniels, exodusters.

After reading the recent post about Hardy Lassiter, Thelma Simmons reached out to alert Black Wide-Awake that another Lassiter also migrated to Arkansas. Elizabeth Lassiter Daniels and her family arrived in Pine Bluff around the same time as her cousin Hardy.

In the 1860 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Silas Lassiter, 38; wife Orpie, 34; children Sallie, 12, Mary, 11, James, 9, John, 7, Elizabeth, 5, Penina, 4, Hardy, 3, Silas, 1, and George, 2 months; and Delpha Simpson, 14. [Note: there were several Hardy Lassiters in this family. Silas Lassiter’s father was named Hardy Lassiter, and Silas named a son after him. Similarly, Silas’ brother Green Lassiter also named a son Hardy, and this Hardy was the one who migrated to Arkansas.]

In the 1870 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farm laborer Silas Lassiter, 47, and children Ophelia, 25, Mary, 20, Elizabeth, 16, Handy, 14, Penninah, 15, Silas W., 12, Milly, 8, and Jerusha, 4.

On 24 December 1879, Henry Daniels, 33, married Elizabeth Lassiter, 24, at E. Lassiter’s in Wilson County. B. Barnes and Short Barnes were witnesses.

On 20 May 1892, Henry Daniels, alias Henry Lewis Daniels, applied for an invalid pension for his service in Company K, 14th U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery. [I am seeking more information about his Civil War service.] Daniels filed from Arkansas, the state to which the family had recently migrated.

In the 1900 census of Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas: day laborer Henry Daniels, 55; wife Elizabeth, 46; and children William H., 17, Martha A., 15, Mary J., 15, and Rice B., 7. All were born in North Carolina except the youngest child.

In the 1908 Pine Bluff, Arkansas, city directory: Daniels Henry (c) mach Prescott Table & Furn Co r 1013 w 8th av

In the 1910 census of Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas: odd jobs laborer Henry Daniels, 66; wife Bettie, 37; and children Henry, 27, street laborer, and Matilda, 10. Bettie reported that only three of her ten children were living.

On 3 March 1912, W.H. Daniel, 30, married Willie Floyd, 24, in Pine Bluff.

In 1918, William Henry Daniels registered for the World War I draft in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Per his registration card, he was born 23 September 1879; lived at 506 East 17th Avenue; worked as a laborer for Standard Lumber Company, Pine Bluff.

In the 1920 census of Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas: at 500 East 17th, Henry Daniels, 78; wife Elizabeth, 65; daughter Mary Webb, 30, and grandchildren Ulus, 10, Felton, 9, Louise E., 8, and Mary, 3. Next door: W. Henry Daniels, 38, born in N.C., railroad shop laborer; wife Willie, 32, born in Georgia; and children Justine, 6, Thurland, 4, Rosabelle, 3, and Doretha, 4 months. [Hardy and Nellie Lassiter occupied the household on the other side of Henry and Elizabeth Daniels, in effect right around the corner.]

Lewis Henry Daniels died 30 May 1920 in Pine Bluff. Per his death certificate, he was 79 years old; was married; was born in North Carolina; was “bright” colored [i.e. very light-skinned]; and lived at 500 East 17th Street. W.H. Daniel was informant. The cause of death: “operation of the eye and heart troubles.” Contributing factor: “Old cival war Soldier.”

In the 1927 Pine Bluff, Arkansas, city directory: Daniels Elizabeth (c) h 500 e 17th av

In 1942, William Henry Daniels registered for the World War II draft in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Per his registration card, he was born in 23 September 1881 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 506 East 17th; he worked for Cotton Belt Railroad, East 2nd Avenue, Pine Bluff; and his contact was Mrs. Willie F. Daniels.

William Henry Daniels Sr. died 25 November 1945 in Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas. Per his death certificate, he was born 23 September 1880 in Wilson, N.C., to Lewis Henry Daniels and Elizabeth Lassiter; was a laborer; and was married to Willie L. Daniels. Doretha M. Daniels was informant.

Hardy and Nellie Harris Lassiter, exodusters.

Hardy Lassiter died in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, on 24 June 1928. Per his death certificate, he was born in Wilson, N.C., to Green Lassiter; was 55 years old; was married to Edith Lassiter; resided at 1801 Texas Street; worked as a laborer for a heading factory; and was buried in Pine Bluff. Julius Lassiter was informant.

Hardy Lassiter actually was closer to 65 years old. He was born about 1864 in Wilson County to Green and Mary Ann Lassiter Powell and was the grandson of this Hardy Lassiter.

In the 1870 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farm laborer Green Lassiter, 46; wife Mary, 31; and children Henry, 10, Sallie, 8, Hardy, 6, and John G., 1 month. Lassiter reported owning $500 in real property and $125 in personal property.

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Green Lassiter, 55; wife Mary Ann, 42; and children Henry, 19, Sally Ann, 17, Hardy, 15, John Green, 10, Dempsey S., 5, and Mary C., 2.

On 6 March 1884, Hardey Lassiter, 20, and Nelley Harriss, 17, were married in Wilson County.

Around 1890, Hardy and Nellie Lassiter joined thousands of African-American North Carolinians migrating to Arkansas seeking better opportunities. The family stopped briefly in Mississippi, but had settled in Pine Bluff by the early 1890s.

In the 1900 census of Pine Bluff, Vaugine township, Jefferson County, Arkansas: at 807 State Street, warehouse porter Hardy Lasker, 34; wife Nellie, 32; and children Henry, 15, sawmill laborer, Hardy, 13, Willie, 8, Julius, 5, Mary, 3, and Arthur, 8 months; plus Mary Bass, 53, widow, mother-in-law. Hardy, Nellie, Henry and Hardy Lassiter were born in North Carolina, as was Mary Bass. Willie Lassiter was born in Mississippi. The remaining children were born in Arkansas.

Moses Theodore Lassiter was born 3 May 1901 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, to Hardy Lassiter, common laborer, born in Wilson, N.C., and Nellie Harris, housewife, born in Wilson, N.C. He was the 8th of their children.

Harry Lassiter was born 29 May 1905 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, to Hardy Lassiter, common laborer, born in Wilson, N.C., and Nellie Harris, housewife, born in Wilson, N.C. He was the 9th of their children.

John V. Lassiter was born 28 September 1907 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, to Hardy Lassiter, common laborer, born in Wilson, N.C., and Nellie Harris, housewife, born in Wilson, N.C. He was the 10th of their children.

In the 1910 census of Pine Bluff, Vaugine township, Jefferson County, Arkansas: grain elevator laborer Harvey Laster, 48; wife Nellie, 41; and children Willie, 18, brickyard laborer, Julius, 15, Mary, 12, Arthur, 10, Moses, 7, Harry, 5, and John, 2; plus Mary Bass, 65, widow, mother-in-law.

In 1917, Willie Lassiter registered for the World War I draft in Pine Bluff. Per his registration card, he was born 30 November 1891 in Greenville, Mississippi; lived at 1303 Georgia, Pine Bluff; was married; and worked as a laborer for Riley Corn Company, Pine Bluff.

In 1917, Julius Lassiter registered for the World War I draft in Pine Bluff. Per his registration card, he was born 3 July 1894; worked as a laborer for Union Seed Fertilizer Company; and had a wife and two children.

In 1918, Arthur Lassiter registered for the World War I draft in Pine Bluff. Per his registration card, he was born 18 September 1899 in Pine Bluff; lived at 1601 Texas Street, Pine Bluff; worked as a laborer for Riley Feed Manufacturing Company, East Forest Avenue, Pine Bluff; and his nearest relative was Nellie Lassiter, 1601 Texas Street.

In the 1920 census of Pine Bluff, Vaugine township, Jefferson County, Arkansas: at 1601 Texas, feed store laborer Hardy Lassiter, 55; wife Nellie, 49; and children Mary, 19, Arthur, 17, feed store laborer, Moses, 16, chauffeur, Harry, 14, and Johnie, 12.

On 11 December 1923, Moses Lassiter, 23, married Anna Lawson, 22, in Pine Bluff.

On 1 June 1924, Arthur Lassiter married Irene Melvin in Pine Bluff.

On 7 August 1924, Mary B. Lassiter, 27, married Sam Taylor, 40, in English, Jefferson County, Arkansas.

The 1927 Pine Bluff, Arkansas, city directory lists:

  • Lassiter Arthur (Irene) lab h 2215 e Barraque
  • Lassiter Hardy (Edith) lab h 1601 Texas
  • Lassiter Hardy (Ruby) lab h 910 e 19th av
  • Lassiter Harry porter Fine’s D G store h 1601 Texas
  • Lassiter Jno auto mech h 1601 Texas
  • Lassiter Julius (Emma) h 1601 Texas

On 26 November 1928, John Lassiter, 21, married Rosa Maiden, 18, in Pine Bluff.

On 18 September 1930, Harry Lassiter, 25, married Ruby Evans, 24, in Pine Bluff.

On 25 September 1930, Moses Lassiter, 26, married Ira Campbell, 20, in Pine Bluff.

On 27 June 1938, Julius Lassiter, 43, married Hallie B. Jones, 27, in Pine Bluff.

In 1942, Willie Lassiter registered for the World War II draft in Lake County, Indiana. Per his registration card, he was born 30 November 1891 in Greenville, Mississippi; lived at 1533 Mass. St., [Gary], Lake County, Indiana; worked for Carnegie Illinois Steel; and his contact was John Lassiter, 6033 Calumet, Chicago, Illinois.

In 1942, Arthur Lassiter registered for the World War II draft in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Per his registration card, he was born 18 September 1899 in Pine Bluff; lived at 1717 East 17th Street, Pine Bluff; his contact was Sadie Whaley of the same address; and he worked for Federal Compress and Warehouse, Plant #2, Pine Bluff.

In 1942, John Farrel Lassiter registered for the World War II draft in Chicago, Illinois. Per his registration card, he was born 28 September 1907 in Pine Bluff; lived at 6033 Calumet, Chicago, Illinois; worked for Sunnyside Auto Company, 4511 Lincoln Avenue, Chicago; and his contact was sister-in-law Adele Maiden Porter.

Willie Lassiter died 7 September 1946 in Proviso township, Cook County, Illinois. Per his death certificate, he was born 30 November 1891 in Greenville, Mississippi, to Hardy Lassiter and Nellie Spanks, both of North Carolina; and was buried in Oak Hill cemetery, Gary, Indiana.

Julius Lassiter died May 1965 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

Arthur Lassiter died 6 July 1967 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Per his death certificate, he was born 18 September 1899 in Pine Bluff to Hardy Lassiter and Nellie Harris; lived at 1516 Missouri Street, Pine Bluff; and worked as a laborer at a compress. Mrs. Sadie Lassiter was informant.

Harry Lassiter died January 1980 in Chicago, Illinois.

Mary Lassiter Taylor died February 1987 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

John Farrell Lassiter died 4 February 1997 in Chicago, Illinois.

 

 

 

 

 

Hardy Lassiter’s estate sale.

Hardy Lassiter died in Wilson County in the spring of 1853. On 16 August 1855, as the settlement of his estate wound down, administrator William L. Farmer sold off Lassiter’s personal property to two of his children Rachel Lassiter and Green Lassiter. The sale account offers a singular look at a free Black man’s most intimate effects — his clothing.

The sale netted $17.44 for one lot of old clothes; twelve other old clothes; five pairs of pants; a lot of clothes; two coats; a lot of stockings; four handkerchiefs; an overcoat; five more coats; a cravat; two brushes; a knife and razor; a razor strop; two hats; one pair of shoes; one umbrella(?); a satchel; one “pocket & pas”; a watch; and a stick.

Hardy Lassiter, North Carolina, U.S. Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998, http://www.ancestry.com.

The death of Mildred Lassiter Sherrod.

Mildred Sherrod and son Earnest, circa 1942.

Wilson Daily Times, 5 February 1943.

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Mildred Sherrod was only 20 years old at her death. She was buried in Rountree Cemetery.

[Note: her surname was spelled two different ways in this death notice — Sherard and Shearard — and the family now uses the spelling “Sherrod.”]

Photo courtesy of Angelia M. Sherrod.

 

Green Lassiter buys land in 1855.

Green Lassiter, a free man of color, bought just over fifty acres from William L. Farmer in December 1855 and registered the deed for his purchase about six weeks later. Wilson County formed in 1855, and this is the first registered purchase of real property by a free person of color in the county. (The land Lassiter bought just north of the town of Wilson had been in Edgecombe County before Wilson County was established, and certainly free people of color had owned land — though they did not often register their deeds — in the parts of Edgecombe, Nash, Wayne, and Johnston Counties that later formed Wilson County.)

Lassiter had a close business relationship with William L. Farmer (who had been the administrator of Green’s father Hardy Lassiter‘s estate), and Farmer’s 1856 estate records show that he had extended Lassiter a number of small loans. 

Deed book 1, page 123, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office.

This Indenture made the 22nd day of December A.D. 1855 between Wm. L. Farmer of the first part & Green Lassiter of the second part all the county of Wilson State of North Carolina witnesseth that for and in consideration of the sum of Four Hundred Dollars the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged that said Wm. L. Farmer has given granted bargained sold & conveyed & by these presents does give grant bargain sell & convey unto the said Green Lassiter his heirs & assigns a certain tract or parcel of land lying in the County of Wilson adjoining the lands of Watson Rountree Washington Ruffin & others containing fifty & a half acres more or less to have & to hold the said Land with the said Green Lassiter his heirs & assigns and the said Wm. L. Farmer does hereby covenant & agree to for himself & his heirs executors & administrators to forever covenant & defend the title hereby conveyed to the said Green Lassiter his heirs & assigns forever In testimony whereof we hereunto set our hands & seals this the day & date above written       W.L. Farmer {seal}

Witness  Isaiah Farmer

Wilson County Feb 5th 1856 The Execution of the foregoing Deed is duly proven by the oat of Isaiah Farmer before me W. Barnes Clerk let it be Registered   W. Barnes Clerk

Received for registration this foregoing Deed the 6th day of Feb 1856  L.T. Sauls Registrar

——

In the 1850 census of Edgecombe County: Hardy Laster, 73, wife Beady, 54, and children Mathew, 26, Silas, 26, Green, 25, Hardy, 21, and Rachel, 20; all described as mulatto. Hardy reported owning $650 of real property.

In the 1860 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Green Lassiter, 36, farmer, and his siblings Mary Lassiter, 24, Matthew Lassiter, 37, and Rachel Lassiter, 30, farm laborers. Green reported $750 in real estate.

Green Lassiter married Mary Ann Powell on 19 January 1860 in Wilson County at Dempsey Powell‘s residence. 

In the 1870 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farm laborer Green Lassiter, 46; wife Mary, 31; and children Henry, 10, Sallie, 8, Hardy, 6, and John G., 1 month. Lassiter reported owning $500 in real property and $125 in personal property.

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Green Lassiter, 55; wife Mary Ann, 42; and children Henry, 19, Sally Ann, 17, Hardy, 15, John Green, 10, Dempsey S., 5, and Mary C., 2.

Mary Mercer died 27 February 1912 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 31 years old; was born in Wilson County to Green Lester and Mary Powell; was married; and engaged in domestic work. Beadie Blackwell was informant.

Hardy Lassiter died 24 June 1928 in Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas. Per his death certificate, he was 55 years old; was born in Wilson, N.C., to Green Lassiter; lived at 1601 Texas, Pine Bluff; was a laborer at a heading factory; and was married. Julius Lassiter was informant.

Dempsey Lassiter died 17 July 1946 at his home at 106 South East Street, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 68 years old; was born in Wilson County to Green Lassiter and Mary Ann Powell; was engaged in farming; was married to Mary J. Lassiter; and was buried in Rountree [actually Odd Fellows] Cemetery.

Studio shots, no. 184: Odessa Creech Lassiter.

Odessa Creech Lassiter (1928-2014).

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In the 1930 census of Smithfield, Johnston County: farm laborer Alonza Creech, 49; wife Callie M., 29; and children Gwendolyn, 5, Roger, 4, Hortense, 3, Odessa, 2, and Roland, 7 months.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer Alonza Creech, 57; wife Callie, 37, tobacco factory laborer; and children Alonzo Jr., 15, Roger, 14, Odessa, 12,  Roland, 9, and Doris, 8.

On 29 March 1947, Marcellus Lassiter, 21, son of Roy Lassiter and Addie Woodard Lassiter, married Odessa Creech, 18, daughter of Alonza L. Creech and Callie Mae Horton, at Rev. Fred M. Davis‘ residence at 621 East Green Street, Wilson.

Photo courtesy of Marcellus Lassiter Jr.

Snaps, no. 89: John H. Lassiter and Ora Lassiter Covington.

John H. Lassiter and granddaughter Ora Lassiter, probably not long before his death in 1915.

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In the 1860 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Silas Lassiter, 38; wife Orpie, 34; children Sallie, 12, Mary, 11, James, 9, John, 7, Elizabeth, 5, Penina, 4, Hardy, 3, Silas, 1, and George, 2 months; and Delpha Simpson, 14.

In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: James Lassiter, 19, and John Lassiter, 18, farm laborers.

On 17 December 1874, John Lassiter, 21, married Lizzie Lunsford, 21, in Johnston County, North Carolina.

In the 1880 census of Pikeville township, Wayne County, North Carolina: John Lassiter, 28, farm hand.

On 26 October 1886, J.H. Lassiter, 34, of Wilson County, son of Silas and Orphy Lassiter, married Isabella Gear, 21, of Wilson County, in Wilson. Carline Vick, Martie Brooks, and John Vick were witnesses, and Baptist minister E.H. Ward performed the ceremony.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: drayman John Lassiter, 50; wife Isabella, 33, wash woman; and children and grandchildren Ida, 17, Henry G., 9, Marcellus, 7, Hardy, 5, and Ora, 7 months.

On 8 January 1908, John H. Lassiter, 50, of Wilson, son of S. and O. Lassiter, married Pattie D. Hunder, 29, of Richmond, Virginia, in Wilson. Joseph S. Jackson, A.M.E. Zion minister, performed the ceremony in the presence of Jim Watson, Harry Mercer and Rev. John Scarboro.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg Road, John H. Lassiter, 57, and children and grandchildren Marcellious, 18, Hardie, 16, and Oeta, 14, all odd jobs laborers.

John Lassiter died 15 June 1915 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 63 years old; was born in Wilson County to Silas Lassiter and Ophie Simpson; and was married. Henry Lassiter was informant.

In the 1916 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Lassiter Ora (c) dom h 512 Stantonsburg rd

On 5 May 1918, Albert Covington, 23, of Wilson, son of Noah and Sarah Covington of Harnett County, married Ora Lassiter, 19, of Wilson, daughter of Henry and Lizzie Lassiter, in Wilson.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 101 East Street, furniture store truck driver Albert Covington, 23; wife Ora, 20; son John, 4 months; roomer Will McNeal, 22, oil mill laborer; and brother-in-law Marcellus Lassiter, 24, tobacco company laborer.

In the 1928 Baltimore, Maryland, city directory: Covington Albert (Ora) chauf h 505 Robert

Detail of photo courtesy of Bernard Patterson.

The estate of William L. Farmer.

William L. Farmer’s hefty estate file contains multiple references to both enslaved people and free people of color.

From an inventory of assets, a list of enslaved people hired out in 1857 and 1858 — Samson, Blunt, Joshua, Jane and Clarkey.

Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 11.34.43 AM.png

A 25 November 1856 inventory of the debts owed to William L. Farmer highlights the web of financial relationships that characterized the largely bankless antebellum South. For many, after land and slaves, their greatest assets consisted of I.O.U.’s.

Green Lassiter (and his sister Rachel Lassiter?) seems to have been one of the largest debtors.

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Terrell Parker‘s $11.32 debt to Farmer was declared “bad,” i.e. uncollectible.

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As were those of many others, including Gray Boseman

Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 11.56.06 AM.png

… another of Green Lassiter’s …

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… the $1.25 Silas Lassiter owed …

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… the $7.50 John R. Locus owed …

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…  the $3.25 Warren Artis owed …

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… debts by Timothy Howard, Lawrence Hagans, Zealous Howard, and James Howard …

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… and another $5.57 owed by Warren Artis.

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Benjamin Thorn hired out Joshua for a year. Jane went to Archibald Roes, and Sampson to Henry Armstrong. The estate paid Evins Baker five dollars to care for Clarky.

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“They are to have 3 soots of Cloths & three pair of shoes one of woolen one hat & one Blanket” Henry Crumpley hired out Daniel for the year, and W.G. Sharp hired Ben. Though both were described as “boys,” their hire prices suggest they were young men in their prime.

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On 6 April 1860, “negro Ben” required a visit to Dr. James G. Armstrong.

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This remarkable document, the only one of its kind I’ve seen, is a receipt for the late fall purchase of goods for Farmer’s slaves — seven blankets, seven pairs of shoes, five wool hats, 18 and-a-half yards of osnaburg, five yards of linsey, one pair of coarse boots, and 29 years of kersey. Osnaburg was a coarse, stiff fabric woven from flax or jute and commonly used to make garments for enslaved people. Linsey (or linsey-woolsey) was another coarse cotton and wool fabric. Kersey was a dense woolen fabric.

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In 27 August 1856, shortly before he died, Farmer gave Rachel Lassiter a note for $15.59, which could have represented money borrowed or more likely services rendered or goods sold.

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On 14 July 1857, Farmer’s administrator, Augustin Farmer, paid Green Lassiter $16.42 to settle a debt.

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William L. Farmer Estate File (1856), Wilson County, North Carolina Estate Files, 1663-1979, http://www.familysearch.org.

The estate of Moses Hagans.

Moses Hagans died early in the spring of 1873. His wife Theresa Lassiter Hagans, unlettered and unfamiliar with the workings of probate, signed over her rights to administer her late husband’s estate to Larry D. Farmer, a public administrator.

record-image_-4.jpg

Farmer filed in Probate Court for letters of administration, estimating the value of Hagans’ estate at $200 and naming his heirs as widow Theresa Hagans and Lucinda Hagans Brantley, who was Hagans’ daughter.

record-image_-3.jpg

On 12 April 1873, Farmer filed an inventory of Hagans’ personal estate, which consisted of meat and lard; household kitchen furniture; “old plunder in & around the houses”; a small amount of lint cotton; corn and peas; a cart and a crosscut saw; fodder; poultry and dogs; a horse and farming implements; sows and pigs; and a garden of greens. All of it was allotted to “Trecy” Hagans for her support while the estate was in probate.

record-image_.jpg

It was a meager showing, insufficient to meet the $300 minimum required for a year’s support.

record-image_-2.jpg

——

In the 1830 census of Edgecombe County, North Carolina, Moses Hagans was head of a household of four free people of color.

In the 1840 census of Edgecombe County, North Carolina, Moses Hagans was head of a household of nine free people of color.

On 10 February 1846, Moses Hagans, “now of Edgecombe,” paid Thomas Hadly of Wayne County $328.50 for 164 1/4 acres on Little Swamp in Nash County. The transaction is recorded in Deed Book 18, page 331. (A mortgage for the purchase is recorded at book 18, page 325.) Little Swamp is now in Wilson County. It rises near Old Raleigh Road; flows south between Radio Tower and Flowers Roads; crosses under Interstate 95 near its junction with N.C. Highway 42; then flows east to join Contentnea Creek.

In the 1850 census of Nash County, North Carolina: Moses Hagans, 48, farmer; wife Pitty, 38; and son Gray B., 19, farmer. Also: Thomas Brantley, 28, turpentine worker, and wife Lucinda, 23.

On 25 October 1857, Moses Hagans applied for a license to marry Trecy Laciter in Wilson County.

In the 1860 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Moses Heggins, 60, farmer, and wife Theresa, 48. Moses claimed $125 in real property and $115 in personal property. [Hagans’ estate records do not mention real property.] Also, Thomas Brantley, 52, farmer; wife Lucinda, 35; and children William, 9, and James W., 6. Thomas claimed $800 in real property, $200 in personal property.

In the 1870 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Moses Hegans, 70; wife Trecy, 50; and James R. Locust, 12, farm laborer. Also: farm laborer Thomas Brantly, 57; wife Lucinda, 39; and son Willie, 15, farm laborer.

Estate Records of Moses Hagans, North Carolina Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.