restaurateur

The obituary of Haywood W. Baker, barber and restaurateur.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 August 1946.

Per records, Haywood Baker was born in Greene County, North Carolina, and lived in Pitt, Nash, and Wilson Counties as well. In addition to Wilson, he owned barber shops in Stantonsburg and Farmville. Presumably, “first white restaurant in Stantonsburg” meant the first to cater to a white clientele. I have not identified the location of his tailor shop.

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On 5 November 1898, Haywood Baker, 20, son of Richard and Almira Baker, married Ora Harper, 19, daughter of Thomas and Leah Harper, in Greene County.

In the 1900 census of Carrs township, Greene County: farmer Haywood Baker, 22; wife Orra, 20; daughter Lula, 6 months; and widowed mother-in-law Laurer Harper, 54.

In the 1910 census of Farmville township, Pitt County: self-employed barber Haywood W. Baker, 30; wife Ora, 29; daughter Lular, 10; and adopted son Stiner, 9.

On 13 November 1912, Haywood Baker, 33, of Nash County, son of Richard and Milie Baker, married Mollie Vines, 26, of Nash County, daughter of Charles and Mahala Vines, in Nash County.

Doris M. Baker died 22 April 1917 in Stantonsburg, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 3 October 1916 in Wilson County to H.W. Baker and Mollie Vines and buried in David graveyard. H.W. Baker was informant.

In 1918, Haywood William Baker registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he resided in Stantonsburg; was 24 February 1870; worked as a barber; and his nearest relative was Mollie Baker.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on Railroad Street, Haden [Haywood] W. Baker, 40, barber; wife Mollie, 33; and children Hilda R., 6, Jasper, 4, Harold, 2, Mary C., 2 months; and Haywood, 12; plus Exum Joyner, 25, barber, and wife Bertha, 24.

An unnamed child died 17 June 1922 in Stantonsburg, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 20 days old and was born in Wilson County to Hawood W. Baker and Mollie Vines. Informant was H.W. Baker. 

In the 1930 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Haywood W. Baker, 52; wife Mollie, 43; and children Charles, 17, Hildarene, 16, Jasper, 14, Harold, 13, Mary P., 11, Richard T., 7, and Carlton Baker, 5.

In the 1940 census of Farmville township, Pitt County: farmer Haywood W. Baker, 62, and children Jasper, 22, Tensley James, 26, Richard Thomas, 16, and Carlton Baker, 14, and Mary Joyner, 20. All reported living in Greene County in 1935 except Tensley, who had lived in Goldsboro, Wayne County.

On 21 October 1941, W.H. Baker, 63, of Farmville, Pitt County, son of Richard and Miley Baker, married Blanche Thomas, 47, of Wilson, in Snow Hill, Greene County, N.C.

In 1942, Richard Thomas Baker registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 24 August 1923 in Stantonsburg; resided at 719 East Green Street, Wilson; his contact was Haywood Baker of the same address; and he worked at G.H.T.M. in Goldsboro, North Carolina.

In 1943, Carlton Baker registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 26 May 1925 in Stantonsburg; resided at 718 East Green Street, Wilson; his contact was H.W. Baker; and he worked for J.E. Gregory, Southern Dairies, 200 Railroad Street, Wilson.

Haywood Baker died 17 August 1946 at Duke Hospital in Durham. Per his death certificate, he was born 14 February 1883 in Greene County; was married to Blanch Baker; resided at 719 East Green Street, Wilson; was a barber; and was buried in Marlboro cemetery, Farmville, Pitt County.

Jasper Bruce Baker died 25 August 1963 in Kinston, Lenoir County, N.C. Per his death certificate, he was born 17 December 1915 in Pitt County, N.C., to Haywood Baker and Mollie Vines; was married to Naomi Baker; lived at 1119 Oak Street, Kinston; and worked as a janitor at F.W. Woolworth.

Tensley James Baker died 3 May 1974 In Goldsboro, Wayne County, N.C. Per his death certificate, he was born 7 May 1911 to Haywood Baker and Ora Harper; was single; and was retired. Dock Baker was informant.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.