1940s

Where did they go?: Out-of-state World War II draft registrations, no. 1.

 

Elton Henry Thomas was the son of Charles Thomas and Sarah Best Thomas. He returned to North Carolina; he died in Goldsboro in 1970.

  • Clarence Charles Dawson

Clarence Charles Dawson was the son of Clarence C. Dawson (see below) and Elizabeth Thomas Dawson.

  • Clarence Connor Dawson

Clarence Connor Dawson was the son of Alexander D. Dawson and Lucy Hill Dawson.

  • Leroy Armstrong

  • Walter Armstrong

  • Van Armstrong

Van Armstrong was the son of Guston and Drucilla Armstrong of Toisnot township, Wilson County. He first appears in the federal census of Petersburg, Virginia, in 1930.

Charles S. Alston was the son of James H. and Martha Dew Alston of Wilson township, Wilson County. On 3 November 1920, Charles S. Alston, 24, married Lessie Barbrey, 22, daughter of Hulis and Lola Barbrey, in Elm City. A.M.E. Zion minister B.P. Coward performed the ceremony in the presence of James O. Bunn, William H. Woods and Charles S. Thomas, all of Wilson.

  • David Alston

David Daniel Alston was the son of Henry and Mary Taylor Alston. He died 8 November 1974 in Norfolk, Virginia.

  • James Henry Adams

  • Edward Adams

 

Nettie Seaberry and Katie Barnes.

Seabury Barnes 12 6 49

Wilson Daily Times, 6 December 1949.

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In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Mark Forsyth, 48; wife Mary, 28; children Gilford, 14, Nettie, 9, Ottis, 6, and Floster, 2; nieces Rebecca, 5, and Louettie, 30; and nephew Willie Forsyth, 22.

On 29 December 1908, Timothy Ceberry, 21, of Cross Roads township, son of Jesse Ceberry and Dollie Barnes, married Nettie Forsythe, 20, of Cross Roads, daughter of Mark and Mary Forsythe. Free Will Baptist minister James(?) Richardson performed the ceremony at the bride’s home in the presence of William Forsythe, James Daniel and Frank Barnes.

In the 1910 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Timothy Sebury, 20, and wife Nettie, 19.

On 5 June 1917, Timothy Seaberry registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 26 October 1889; resided in Lucama; worked as a tenant farmer for J.H. Lamm; had a dependant wife and children and a “short leg from having been broken.”  He was literate and signed his name in clear cursive.

In the 1920 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Timothy Seabury, 30; wife Nettie F., 29; and children Joseph, 10, and Tramilla, 9.

In the 1930 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Timothy Seaberry, 42; wife Nettie, 42; children Joseph, 17, and Trumiller, 15; and boarder Benjamin Kirby, 19.

In the 1940 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer Temathy Seabbry, 51; wife Nettie, 51; Cora M., 8; and farmhand George Hinnant, 18.

Nettie Seabury died 2 December 1949 in Lucama, Cross Roads township. Per her death certificate, she was born 9 October 1888 in Durham County to Mark Tate and Mary Morgan. She was buried in Williamson cemetery.

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On 23 March 1916, Katie Bynum, 20, and Robert Barnes, 21, of Stantonsburg, were married by Missionary Baptist minister S.H. Jones in the presence of Jas. Walter Newsom, General Ellis, and Bennie Barnes.

In 1918, Robert Lee Barnes registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 20 September 1898; resided on R. 2, Stantonsburg; farmed for Fred Washington; and his nearest relative was Katie Barnes. He signed his card with a firm hand.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Robert Barnes, 22; wife Katy, 22; son [sic] William, 12, and daughter Alice, 7; nephew Augustus Speight, 15; and lodger Sarah Hagan, 17.

In the 1930 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Robert Barnes, 32; wife Kallie, 32; and children Alice, 12, John L., 12, Bessie M., 8, Robert L., 7, Mitchell, 5, and Fred A., 9 months.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 616 Suggs Street, tobacco factory laborer Hattie Barnes, 46, and children Robert, 18, James, 14, and Fred A., 10; also lumber Fred Barnes, 40; wife Percy L., 26; and children Claudett, 6, Fred L. Jr., 2, and Clarence, no age given.

Kattie Barnes died 4 December 1949 at her home at 648 Suggs Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 15 November 1902 in Greene County to Johnnie and Alice Bynum and was married. Informant was Alice Moses of Wilson.

The AKAs arrive in Wilson.

“The dream of establishing a graduate chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. in Wilson, NC had its origin in the mind of Soror Norma Darden during the late ‘30’s.  As years passed, she decided to organize a chapter in Wilson. However, this was very difficult since she had to have at least seven members for the establishment of a chapter.  After many years of searching for eligible ladies, her task was completed. On February 18, 1940, Gamma Beta Omega became a reality.”

The first members were Sorors Norma Darden, Dolores Hines, Rosa L. Williams, Vera G. Shade, Peggy Cooper, Marian Davis, and Odelle Barnes (a founder and charter member of Alpha Chi Chapter at North Carolina Central University, formerly North Carolina College, in 1932). Soror Darden served as the first basileus. In 1941 the first members to be initiated into the chapter were Sorors Mae Lord, Cora Washington, and Marian H. Miller.

Adapted from gboaka.com, the website of the Gamma Beta Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

The greatest generation, pt. 3.

Each year the Wilson Daily Times publishes an advertising supplement that honors local veterans on Veterans Day. The insert features photographs submitted to the paper by its readership. This post is the third highlighting African-American soldiers and sailors included in the supplement.

  • Nathaniel Jones, Army, World War II

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  • Roma Jones, S.Sgt., Army, World War II

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  • Eddie L. Joyner, Army, World War I

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  • James Calvin Lewis, Army, 1944-46

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  • James Reid, Army, 1942-46

  • Aaron Swinson, Army, 1943

  • William R. White, Sgt., Army, 1941-45

  • Arthur Winstead, Army, World War II

  • Jacelle Winstead, Corp., Army, World War II

The Ques arrive in Wilson.

Nu Alpha Chapter was founded in Wilson, North Carolina, on November 17, 1936. The Chapter was chartered in New Bern on December 5, 1936, with the following officers: Basileus Bro. Boisey O. Barnes (Wilson), Vice Basileus Bro. William Perkins (Tarboro), Keeper of Records and Seal Bro. Aaron Womack (Kinston), Chaplain Bro. D.F. Martinez, Editor to the Oracle Bro. Randolph Armstrong (Rocky Mount), and Keeper of Peace Bro. John Jackson (Goldsboro). The chapter consisted of men from Wilson, Rocky Mount, Tarboro, Greenville, New Bern, Goldsboro, Kinston and surrounding areas. Later, Brothers joined or were initiated from Jacksonville, Elm City, Henderson, Elizabeth City, Beaufort, Plymouth, Scotland Neck and LaGrange. They met monthly on a rotating basis in all the cities represented. (Eventually, as a result of the travel burdens imposed across such a large geographic region, Nu Alpha chartered seven new chapters, including Beta Beta Beta in Wilson in the 1970s.)

Of Nu Alpha’s 61 charter members, these Brothers have been identified as Wilson County residents: B.O. Barnes, John M. Miller, Samuel H. Vick, and Malcolm D. Williams. Over the next twelve years, these men joined the chapter: Spencer J. Satchell (1941), Julian B. Rosemond (1942), Kenneth M. Shade (1945), Charles E. Branford and Ellis Brown (1947), and James C. Ellis and Alvis A. Hines (1948).

Adapted from the website of Nu Alpha chapter, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

The greatest generation, pt. 2.

Each year the Wilson Daily Times publishes an advertising supplement that honors local veterans on Veterans Day. The insert features photographs submitted to the paper by its readership. This post is the second highlighting African-American soldiers and sailors included in the supplement.

  • Lossie Batts, Corp., Army, 1945-46

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  • Colonious Junius Best, Army, World War II

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  • Roosevelt W. Best, Army, 1941-44

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  • Charles W. Christian, Sgt., Navy, 1940-44

Charles Wesley Christian’s wife Ada Odelle Harris Christian (1913-1992) was a Wilson native.

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  • Louis Hall Sr., Army Air Corps, 1945-47

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  • Joseph Harris, PFC, Army, 1946

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  • William H. Harris, FPC, Army, 1943-46

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  • Damp Haskins Jr., Army, 1945-47

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1200 Wainright Street, Coca-Cola plant laborer Damp Haskins, 24; wife Susie B., 21; son Damp Jr., 2, and daughter Hellen, 6 months; mother Hester, 72; brother Joseph, 18; Martha Pitt, 52; and nephew Jim Haskins, 10.

  • Willis Edward Hyman, Navy, World War II

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  • Johnnie A. Lucas, T-5, Army, World War II

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  • Reuben O’Neal Sr., Steward Mate, Navy, 1944-46

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U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, database on-line, http://www.ancestry.com.

The greatest generation, pt. 1.

Each year the Wilson Daily Times publishes an advertising supplement that honors local veterans on Veterans Day. The insert features photographs submitted to the paper by its readership. This post is the first of several highlighting African-American soldiers and sailors included in the supplement.

  • Paul Garfield Arrington, Army, World War II

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  • George E. Atkinson, PFC, Army, 1941-1945

  • Willie M. Atkinson, PFC, Army, 1945-46

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  • Curley Bagley, Army, 1942-46

In the 1910 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Lenora Bagley, 55; daughter Etta, 27; and her children Earnest, 16, Perry, 11, Presley, 6, Ida V., 3, and Curley, 1.

In the 1920 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Etta Bagley, 35, and children Ida W., 13, Curlie, 11, William H., 9, Cornelia, 6, and James R., 3.

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  • Earnest Barnes, PFC, Army, 1942-45

At least three men named Earnest or Ernest Barnes registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County.

  • Matthew Lee Barnes, S.Sgt., Army, 1942-46

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  • Robert Barnes, T4, Army, 1946-47

Several men named Robert Barnes registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County.

U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, database on-line, http://www.ancestry.com.

On this Veteran’s Day…

Family lore has it that Lucian Jacob Henderson attempted to join the Army at 15 or 16 as World War II was in full rage.  He was finally able to enlist on 28 October 1944, his 18th birthday. Though his home address was 1109 Queen Street, Wilson, he was working as a deckhand for the Norfolk & Washington Steamboat Company at the time and signed up at a draft office in Washington, D.C.

The following year, Henderson qualified as an infantry rifleman after spending four months in basic and advanced training at the Infantry Replacement Training Center in Fort McClellan, Alabama.

Lucian J. Henderson, probably 1945-46. His shoulder patch bears the insignia of the Sixth United States Army, with whom he served occupation duty in Japan at the end of 1945.

Lucian J. Henderson, at left.

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; photographs from the collection of Hattie Henderson Ricks.

Charm and talent at Hampton Institute.

Pittsburgh Courier, 7 November 1942.

Hampton Institute’s 1942 freshman class included Parthenia Robinson of Wilson, right, a member of the Kampus Kamera Klub.

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In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 202 Vick Street, barber Golden Robinson, 30; wife Bertie, 23; and children Parthenia, 5, Gold M., 3, and Glean, 1.

On 7 June 1951 in Nottoway County, Virginia, Anne Parthenia Robinson, 25, daughter of Goldwyn Robinson and Bertie Parks, born in Wilson, resident of Washington, D.C., married Berkeley Graham Burrell, 31, son of Hayward G. Burrell and Fannie Mae Miles, born in Washington, D.C., and a soldier at Camp Pickett, Virginia.