Lucas

Mrs. Lucas returns from Ohio.

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New York Age, 18 December 1913.

Rose Farmer Harris Lucas visited her son Frank Harris in Youngstown, Ohio, late in 1913.

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In the 1870 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: Daniel Farmer, 37; wife Axele, 36; and children Rosa, 14, Cherry, 12, Hardy, 7, and Elbert, 3.

Burton Harriss married Rosa Farmer on 19 March 1874 in Wilson County.

In the 1880 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Rosa Harris, 24, farm laborer, with children Frank M., 4, and John H., 1.

On 22 September 1891, Elbert Locus, 36, of Toisnot township, son of Richard and Elizabeth Locus, and Rosa Harris, 28, of Nash County, daughter of Daniel and Alice Farmer of Wilson County, obtained a marriage license in Wilson County.

In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer Elbert Locus, 45; wife Rose, 42; and children Leaner and Lillie, 18, Bettie, 16, Gertie, 15, Jessie, 13, Flora, 7, Bertie, 4, and Floyd, 6 months.

In the 1910 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: on Nash Road, Elbert Locust, 50; wife Rose, 46; and daughter Berta, 14.

In the 1910 census of Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio: at 407 East Federal Street, North Carolina-born Frank W. Harris, 33, clothing store janitor, is listed as a roomer in the household of Thomas Zehennea, 43, a butcher and native of Turkey.

Frank Wellington Harris registered for the World War I draft in Youngstown, Ohio, in 1918. Per his registration card, he was born 23 May 1874; lived at 902 McHenry Street; worked as a laborer for Youngstown Sheet and Tube, and was married to Frances Harris.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Albert Lucius, 61 wife Rosey, 61; and Etta, 16, Emma, 13, Isaac, 12, Ruby, 10, Edward, 10, Martha, 11, and Marrel Lucius, 6.

In the 1920 census of Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio: Frank Harris, 40, born N.C., “confectory” store porter, and wife Frances, 39, born in Pennsylvania.

Elbert Lucas died 24 March 1924 in Toisnot township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 65 years old; was born in Wilson County to Richard Lucas and Elizabeth Evans; was married to Rosa Harried; and worked as a tenant farmer for W.E. Barnes. Informant was Will Lucas, Elm City.

Frank Harris died 5 December 1928 in Youngstown, Ohio, at the age of 49. Per his death certificate, he lived at 333 East Rayen Avenue; was married to Frances Harris; was born in 1879 in Elm City, N.C., to Bert Harris and an unknown mother; and worked as a laborer. He was buried in Belmont Avenue cemetery.

Ohio Deaths 1908-1952, digitized at http://www.familysearch.org.

Studio shots, no. 131: Robert Lucas.

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Robert Lucas (1888-1973).

Bob Locus, 22, of Taylors township, son of Duncan and Barbary Locus, married Etta Howard, 18, of Taylors, daughter of Deal and Nancy Howard, on 29 January 1909. [Duncan Locus, 65, of Taylors, married Barbara Eatman, 40, daughter of Jim Taylor and Cary Eatman, on 11 February 1896 in Wilson township.]

In the 1910 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: on Sharp Road, farm laborer Bob Lucas, 21; wife Etta, 19, and daughter Nannie M., 3 months.

In 1917, Robert Lucas registered for the World War I draft. Per his registration card, he was born 20 May 1888 in Nash County; lived in Wilson County; farmed for William Mercer in Wilson County; and had a wife and four children. He signed his name ‘Bob Lucas.’

In the 1920 census of Oldfields township, Wilson County: farmer Bob Lucas, 30; wife Etta, 30; and children Nannie, 10, Ella, 8, Addie, 6, Herman, 4, and Lillie, 1.

In the 1930 census of Jackson township, Nash County: farm laborer Robert Lucas, 42; wife Etta, 41; children Ella, 18, Addie, 16, Herman, 14, Lillie, 12, James, 10, and Willie, 8; and grandchildren Doretha, 3, and Chaner, 3 months.

On 23 November 1934, Herman Lucas, 21, of Wilson County, son of Bob and Etta Lucas, and Mamie Lee Brockington, 19, of Wilson County, daughter of John and Mary Brockington, in Nashville, North Carolina. Witnesses were D. Elbert Williams, Addie Williams and Silas Wright, all of Wilson.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 502 Warren Street, Bob Lucas, 50, W.P. A. laborer; wife Etta, 44; children Eller, 24, tobacco factory hanger, Lillie, 20, tobacco factory hanger, James, 18, carpenter’s helper, and Willie, 15; grandchildren Doretha, 11, Etta, 8, Christine, 4, and Shirley, 2.

In 1945, Wade Hilton Finch registered for the World War II draft. Per his registration card, he was born 17 May 1927 in Wilson County; lived at 502 South Warren Street, Wilson; his contact was grandfather Bob Lucas, 502 South Warren; and he worked for mechanic Joe Knight, 501 South Warren.

Robert Lucas died 26 July 1973 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 30 June 1894; worked with carpenter; was married to Rosetta Lucas. Informant was Herman Lucas, 1701 East Nash Street, Wilson.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user weezalini.

The obituary of Herman P. Lucas, Sr., 103.

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Herman P. Lucas Sr., 103, of Wilson, died Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. Funeral will be 2 p.m. Sunday at Contending for the Faith Church Ministries. Burial will follow in Rest Haven Cemetery. Visitation will be 3 p.m. Saturday at Stevens Funeral Home. Arrangements are by Stevens Funeral Home. www.wilsontimes.com, 6 December 2019.

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I am not entirely sure, but I believe Herman P. Lucas Sr. to have been the son of Robert and Etta Howard Lucas. Corrections requested.

In the 1920 census of Oldfields township, Wilson County: farmer Bob Lucas, 30; wife Etta, 30; and children Nannie, 10, Ella, 8, Addie, 6, Herman, 4, and Lillie, 1.

In the 1930 census of Jackson township, Nash County: farm laborer Robert Lucas, 42; wife Etta, 41; children Ella, 18, Addie, 16, Herman, 14, Lillie, 12, James, 10, and Willie, 8; and grandchildren Doretha, 3, and Chaner, 3 months.

On 23 November 1934, Herman Lucas, 21, of Wilson County, son of Bob and Etta Lucas, and Mamie Lee Brockington, 19, of Wilson County, daughter of John and Mary Brockington, in Nashville, North Carolina. Witnesses were D. Elbert Williams, Addie Williams and Silas Wright, all of Wilson.

Herman Lucas registered for the World War II draft in 1940 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 27 February 1915 in Wilson; lived at R.F.D. #1, Wilson; was married to Mamie Lucas; and worked for Mollie Howard. [If this is in fact Herman Lucas’ correct birth date, he was 104 at his death, not 103.]

Attack on Prof. J.D. Reid.

Feelings ran high in the days after school superintendent Charles L. Coon slapped Mary Euell, an African-American teacher who had been hauled to his office by principal J.D. Reid. So high that three men jumped Reid as he left church the following Sunday.

Per the Wilson Daily Times, 16 April 1918:

As a result of the attack on Prof. J.D. Reid, principal of the colored graded school yesterday while he was coming out of the First Baptist church, colored after the morning services three negroes named Frank Hooker, Henry Lucas and Will Jenkins, the first two were arrested yesterday and placed under bonds of $300 each for their appearance Friday morning before his honor and Will Jenkins he ran away yesterday and was not captured until this morning is now in jail. It is alleged that Will Jenkins had a gun and that it was taken away from him by a colored man by the name of John Spell and thus prevented him from using it. Will denies that he had a pistol of his own. He says that one dropped the pistol and that he picked it up, and that he had no intention of using it on Reid. Reid was not hurt in the assault. It seems that some two blows were struck him before the parties were separated.

This is an aftermath of the trouble referred to last week in this paper growing put of the reproof of the teacher by Mr. Coon, who was called into his office in the Fidelity building at the instance of Reid for alleged failure to obey a ruling regarding the opening of school on the day the new daylight law went into effect. The woman teacher says that Mr. Coon slapped her and that when she called on Reid to protect her that Reid told her to behave herself and held the door to keep her from going out.

Following this assault on the woman leading colored men of the Ministerial Union and Business League made representations to the Board of Trustees of the school preferring charges against Reid and asked them to dismiss him from the position at the head stating that he was entirely persona non grata to their people and that he had lost his usefulness among them as an educator.

The school board had before them here Saturday afternoon Prof. Sam Vick, Rev. Weeks, pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist church and Rev. Taylor, pastor of the Presbyterian church, colored of this city, and Dr. Hargrave, a leading colored physician of Wilson. The board heard the matter and agreed to take the charges under advisement.

In the meantime Prof. Reid informed Mayor Killette that he felt on account of threats that he was in danger of his life and asked for protection. This was promptly given, officers having been stationed at the residence of Prof. Reid for the past tow or three nights. The prompt action of the mayor yesterday will probably stop the assaults on Reid, for he is determined to stop this effort to take the law into their own hands.

In the meantime the colored graded schools in this city are not running. Eleven of the fourteen teachers resigned at the beginning of the trouble and two of the others since. The question was asked by members of the board Saturday if it would pay to reorganize the school for the short space of time the remainder of the session and the answer was returned by the colored men present that they did not think it would.

However as to what action the board of trustees will take towards continuing the school the remainder of the session we are not prepared to say.

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  • J.D. Reid — Reid was forced out of his position as principal, but regained the trust of the community. For a while, anyway. Two years later, Reid was appointed vice-president of the brand-new Commercial Bank, a position he held until the bank failed amid charges of forgery and embezzlement.
  • Frank Hooker — Hooker, a sawyer, was about 46 years old when he clouted Reid.
  • Henry Lucas — Lucas was a brickmason.
  • Will Jenkins — Jenkins was a lumberyard laborer with a history of scapes.
  • John Spell — John S. Spell was a contractor-carpenter.
  • Sam Vick — Samuel H. Vick was Educator, politician, businessman, real estate developer, church leader
  • Rev. Weeks — Alfred L.E. Weeks.
  • Rev. Taylor — Halley B. Taylor.
  • Dr. Hargrave — Frank S. Hargrave.

Studio shots, 114: David Lucas.

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David Lucas (1903-1941).

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In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: tenant farmer Henry Locus, 36; wife Ida, 30; and children Minnie, 12, Joseph, 11, Lou, 9, Davis, 7, and Willie, 5.

In the 1920 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: on Rocky Mount Road, farmer Henry Locus, 48; wife Ida, 39; and children Joseph, 23, David, 17, and Willie, 15.

On 26 November 1927, David Locus, 24, of Toisnot township, married Thelma Winstead, 20, of Nash County, in Wilson County.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer David Locas, 27; wife Thelma, 24; and daughter Erma D., 2 months.

In the 1940 census of Upper Fishing Creek, Edgecombe County: on Highway 44, farmer David Lucus, 37; wife Thelma, 33; and children Irma, 11, Ruby Morris, 9, Evellar, 6, Thurman, 5, Yvonne, 3, and Mae Clee, 3 months.

David Lucas died 1 January 1941 in Tarboro, Edgecombe County. Per his death certificate, he was born 1 March 1903 in Wilson to Henry Lucus of Nash County and Ida Pender of Wilson County; was married to Thelma Lucus; worked as a farmer; and was buried at Williams Chapel, Wilson County.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user cclemmiles.

Lucas delivers retribution.

The facts are little muddled, but the message is clear. James Lucas was sentenced to 30 days of roadwork after assaulting principal J.D. Reid (not C.L. Reed) for failing to defend Mary Euell from Charles L. Coon’s abuse.

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The Union (Wilmington, N.C.) Labor Record, 25 May 1918.

The 1920 census records two African-Americans named James Lucas in Wilson. One was a 16 year-old boy, the other was, at 610 Lodge Street, lumber company laborer James Lucas, 27, with wife Mattie, 30, and children Jack, 13, and Georgia Belle, 11.

Studio shots, no. 104: Winnie Locus Rankin.

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Winnie Locus Rankin (1915-1961).

In the 1920 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farmer Edward Locus, 37; wife Cora, 27; and children Linwood, 10, Maggie, 9, Beulah, 8, Winnie, 6, Chicken, 4, Delphy, 3, John Ed., 1, and Quinton, 6 months.

In the 1930 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: farmer Ed Locus, 47; wife Cora, 35; and children Linward, 20, Maggie, 19, Ula, 18, Winnie, 17, Alma, 16, Redelpha, 13, John E., 11, Clinton, 10, Kenny, 9, Josephine, 7, Easter, 5, Louise, 4, Frank, 3, and Nancy, an infant.

In the 1944 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, city directory: Rankin Herman (Winnie) lab h 319 Calliope

In the 1953 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, city directory: Rankin Herman (c; Winnie) h 319 Calliope

Winnie Lucas Rankin died 19 October 1961 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user samjoyatk.

 

405 and 415 Maury Street.

Maury Street is outside the East Wilson Historic District. It is one of a cluster of narrow streets squeezed between the railroad and what was once an industrial area crowded with a stemmery, cotton oil and fertilizer mills.

405 Maury Street.

This house does not appear in the 1922 Sanborn fire insurance maps of Wilson and was likely built in the late 1920s to house tobacco factory and mill laborers.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 405 Murray [Maury], renting for $12/month, tobacco factory laborers Hasty Cooper, 36, widow, and Lena Simmons, 25.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 405 Maury, renting for $10/month, Percy Lucas, 30, laborer on WPA project, and wife Eva, 23, tobacco factory laborer.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 405 Maury was vacant.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Franklin, John (c) lab h 405 Maury

415 Maury Street. 

This house does not appear in the 1922 Sanborn fire insurance maps of Wilson and was likely built in the late 1920s to house tobacco factory and mill laborers.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 415 Murray [Maury], renting for $16/month, cook Annie Cambell, 34; her children Paul, 18, fish market salesman, and Christine, 16, tobacco factory laborer; and grandson Paul, 0. All the adults were born in South Carolina.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 415 Maury, renting for $12/month, laundress Lena Barnes, 49, and children Harvey, 28, well digger; Paulean, 17, housekeeper; and “new workers” Evylene, 14, and James, 19.

In 1940, Harvey Barnes registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 9 April 1913 in Wilson County; resided at 1505 West Nash, Wilson; his contact was mother Lena Barnes, 415 Maurry; and he worked for Mr. B.T. Smith, 1505 West Nash.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Lena (c) maid h 415 Maury

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Wiggins Blanche (c) tob wkr h 415 Maury and Wood Rosa Mrs (c) 415 Maury

Photographs taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018. (Note that 405 Maury, condition notwithstanding, is advertised for sale or rent.)

The division of Kenyon Locus’ land.

Plat Book 2, Page 171, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson County Courthouse.

Kenyon Locus‘ estate included about 66 acres of land in Taylors township, Wilson County. His property was divided and platted in January 1942, a little over a year after his death. It was bordered on the north side by a road leading to the Wilson-Nashville Highway [N.C. Highway 58] and on the west by a road leading south to Wilson via Ellis Chapel. The property to his south was jointly owned by Charlie Brantley and Mollie Howard, heirs of Henderson Brantley. To the north was acreage owned by Will and Sylvia Howard (or Batchelor) Lucas. A house and several other buildings cluster on a small road that hooked across the northwest corner of the property.

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In the 1880 census of Jackson township, Nash County: John Locus, 30; wife Delpha, 30; and children Frank, 10, Dora, 8, Kenny, 5, Nancy, 4, and Samuel, 9 months.

In the 1900 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Johnnie Lucus, 43; wife Delpha, 51; children Kinion, 26, Nannie, 24, Edwin, 15, Sidney, 12, and Susan, 9; and grandsons Bunion, 5, and Martin L., 3.

In the 1910 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: on Howards Path, John Locust, 66; wife Delphia, 64; children Kinyan, 36, and Susie, 19; and grandchildren Bunyan, 15, Luther M., 13, and Roxie, 7 months.

In the 1920 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: John Locus, 77; wife Delphi, 65; son Kennie, 48; and grandchildren Roxie, 11, and Luther, 23.

In the 1940 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: Kerney Locus, 67; wife Bell, 53; and lodger Frosty Pond, 33.

Kenney Locas died 10 December 1940 as the result of a terrible farming accident. Working in a field on his farm, he slipped off a stalk cutter and suffered a crushed leg and pelvis. He was taken to Mercy Hospital, where he was declared dead. Per Locus’ death certificate, he was 66 years old; was married to Isabella Locas, age 55; was born in Wilson County to John Locas of Wilson County and Delphia Taylor of Nash County; and worked as a farmer.

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