foodways

The pitmasters of Dixie Inn.

From “Facts … About Wilson North Carolina: The City of Beautiful Trees,” a 1934 publication of the Wilson Chamber of Commerce.

The Dixie Inn opened in 1930 just south of Wilson and quickly established itself as the go-to spot for nights out, civic group meetings, company banquets, and rehearsal dinners. Its painted roof proclaimed its specialties, barbecue and oysters. Like every restaurant of its time and place, Dixie Inn was strictly segregated — at least, in terms of its dining tables. The Inn’s cooks and wait staff were Black, as were their so-called “pitboys,” the men who produced the barbecue for which the Inn was renowned. The photo above shows several African-American men shoveling charcoal under a long row of halved hogs and others tending to the fire that produced the coals while a boy in a cap looks on.

 

Colored boys and girls in the corn and canning clubs.

Without comment, on 7 June 1917, the Wilson Daily Times published a lengthy list of names and addresses of children who were members of corn (for boys) and canning (girls) clubs in Wilson, Lucama, and Stantonsburg. The groups, supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, were the precursors to 4-H Clubs.

Given the canning club membership requirements, it’s astonishing that so many town girls were involved. Per Farm Life Readers, Book 5 (Bryan, Evans & Duncan, 1916, page 38): “Any girl between the ages of nine and eighteen in the county, where the work is organized may become a member. She must plant one-tenth of an acre to tomatoes, and must do all the work connected with her garden except preparing the soil for her plants. Prizes are offered for the largest yield, the largest net gain, the best display in glass jars, best history of garden work, the largest tomato, the most perfect tomato, the largest, neatest best collection of tomato recipes.”

Cover of notebook created by North Carolina canning club girl, 1915. Wilson County girls would have been required to create such a document. Jane Simpson McKimmon Papers (PC 234), State of Archives of North Carolina.

Below, the lists of children consolidated and alphabetized:

Lucama

  • Allen, Rose, Route 2
  • Atkinson, Addie, Route 2
  • Atkinson, Mattie, Route 2
  • Barnes, Fletcher, Route 3 Box 68
  • Barnes, Joseph, Route 3 Box 68
  • Barnes, Sarah, Route 3 Box 68
  • Battle, Jason
  • Battle, Mamie
  • Battle, Redmond (son of Columbus and Sallie R. Battle)
  • Bethea, Lillie, Box 77
  • Boykin, Ida, Route 3 Box 76 (daughter of William T. and Sarah Boykin)
  • Boykin, Katie, Route 3 Box 76 (daughter of William T. and Sarah Boykin)
  • Cherry, Eldora, Route 2 (granddaughter of Arch and Martha M. Atkinson)
  • Creech, Daisy, Route 3 Box 74 (daughter of Troy and Martha Creech)
  • Creech, Dorsey, Route 3 Box 74 (son of Troy and Martha Creech)
  • Creech, James, Route 3 Box 14
  • Creech, Naomi, Route 3 Box 14
  • Creech, William, Route 3 Box 14
  • Dew, Joseph, Box 92 (son of Cornelius D. and Cora L. Dew)
  • Dew, Martha, Box 92 (daughter of Cornelius D. and Cora L. Dew)
  • Ellis, Allman, Route 3 Box 14
  • Dupree, Smithie, Route 3 Box 96 (daughter of Moses and Henrietta S. Dupree)
  • Forsythe, Isabella, Route 3
  • Forsythe, Lena, Route 3 (daughter of Mac and Mary Forsythe)
  • Forsythe, William, Route 3
  • Harris, Alvester (son of Andrew J. and Henrietta Harris)
  • Kent, Elijah (son of Rufus and Maggie Kent)
  • Murchison, Johnnie, Route 3 (John J., son of Samuel A. and Martha Murchison)
  • Newsome, Adam, Route 1 (son of Larry and Louetta Artis Newsome)
  • Newsome, Genatus, Route 1 (William Genatus, Larry and Louetta Artis Newsome)
  • Pate, Alvestor, Route 3 Box 75 (son of James G. and Heterow Pate)
  • Pate, Daisy, Route 3 Box 75-A (daughter of James G. and Heterow Pate)
  • Proctor, Bessie, Route 1 Box 15 (daughter of Charlie and Dorita Proctor)
  • Thomas [Thompson], Addie, Box 11 (daughter of Nelson and Melvina Thompson)
  • Thompson, Lillie, Box 11 (daughter of Nelson and Melvina Thompson)
  • Thompson, Nettie, Box 11 (daughter of Nelson and Melvina Thompson)
  • Westley, Mattie (daughter of John A. Wesley)
  • Whitley, Clarence, Route 1 Box 61-B (son of James and India Whitley)
  • Williams, Beatrice, Route 1 Box 95
  • Williams, Essie, Route 3 Box 68
  • Williams, James, Route 1 Box 95
  • Williams, Martha, Route 1 Box 61
  • Williams, Minnie, Route 3 Box 68
  • Williams, Odessa, Route 3 Box __
  • Williamson, Eliza, Route 3 Box 68

Wilson

  • Adkinson, Viola, 649 East Green Street
  • Allen, Lema [Lena], Raleigh Road (daughter of John and Martha Allen)
  • Bagley, Herman, 609 Viola Street (son of Edward and Effie Newsome Bagley)
  • Barefoot, Martha, 103 Viola Street (son of Wiley and Maggie Barefoot)
  • Barnes, Alena, 504 East Green Street
  • Barnes, Alma, Atlanta [Atlantic] Street (daughter of Lemon and Lizzie Barnes)
  • Barnes, Anna, 103 Wiggins Street
  • Barnes, Annie, 211 Manchester Street
  • Barnes, Annie, 213 Pender Street
  • Barnes, Antelia [Artelia], 121 Pender Street (daughter of John M. and Annie Darden Barnes)
  • Barnes, Ardenia, 563 [East] Nash Street (daughter of Jesse and Sarah Barnes Barnes)
  • Barnes, Boisey, 612 East Green Street (son of Dave and Della Hines Barnes)
  • Barnes, Edward, Atlanta [Atlantic] Street (son of Lemon and Lizzie Barnes)
  • Barnes, Frank, 106 East Nash Street
  • Barnes, Gretchen, Nash and Reid Street
  • Barnes, Jessie, 561 East Green Street
  • Barnes, Joseph, 312 Manchester Street
  • Barnes, Lizzie, Route 3 Box 82
  • Barnes, Lucinda, Grabneck
  • Barnes, Mable, 504 East Green Street
  • Barnes, Margaret, Mason Street
  • Barnes, Rosa, 14 Harper Street
  • Barnes, Thelma, Leigh [Lee] Street
  • Barnes, Victoria, Route 1, Box 126
  • Barnes, Wearland, Leigh [Lee] Street (son of William I. and Madie Taylor Barnes)
  • Battle, Annie, 628 East Nash Street
  • Battle, Annie, 135 Sugg Street
  • Battle, Effie, Suggs Street
  • Bess, Suprema, 1105 East Nash Street (granddaughter of Benjamin and Eliza Ellis Best)
  • Best, Laura, West Nash Street (daughter of Noah and Sarah Best)
  • Best, Mattie, 631 East _____
  • Blount, Joseph, Cemetery Street (son of Daniel and Susana Blount)
  • Blount, Walter, 206 Pender Street (son of John and Mary J. Blount)
  • Boykin, Mabel, 700 Viola Street
  • Brannick, Bessie, 139 Ash Street
  • Bullock, Rachel, 412 Lodge Street (daughter of Richard and Lucretia Beal Bullock)
  • Bynum, Agusta, 143 Sugg Street (daughter of Charlie and Sarah Barnes Bynum)
  • Bynum, Cathrin, 541 [East] Nash Street (daughter of Mack and Victoria Bullock Bynum)
  • Bynum, Irene, 140 Suggs Street (daughter of Archibald and Lillie Woodard Bynum)
  • Bynum, Leah, 541 East Nash Street (daughter of Mack and Victoria Bullock Bynum)
  • Cannon, Ethel, 616 East Nash Street (daughter of John and Florence Cannon)
  • Carroll, Mary, 507 Vicks Alley
  • Chapman, Delzelle, 206 Stantonsburg Street
  • Crawford, Willard, 705 Spring Street (son of Joe and Annie Crawford)
  • Cox, Minnie, 109 Green Street (daughter of Floyd and Lula Cox)
  • Dawson, Almedo, 505 East Vance Street
  • Dupree, Nancy, Vick Street (daughter of Wiley and Victoria Woodard Dupree)
  • Edwards, Jonathan, 609 Robinson Street (son of Henry Edwards)
  • Ellis, Charles, 665 Carolina Street
  • Ellis, Florence, 157 Atlanta [Atlantic] Street
  • Ennis, Freeman, 401 Pine Street (son of Samuel and Maggie Barnes Ennis)
  • Farmer, Clara, Mason Street
  • Farmer, Gladys, Barnes Street (daughter of Jason and Bessie Farmer)
  • Faulk, Marie, 210 Pender Street (daughter of Hiram and Arzulia Mitchell Faulk)
  • Gaston, Lorenzo, 120 Manchester Street
  • Grantham, John E., 205 Reid Street
  • Green, Ida, 628 Green Street
  • Green, William, 1208 Pender Street
  • Griffis, Hazel, Vick Street
  • Hall, Flora, 607 Sunshine Street
  • Hargreaves, Willie, 663 East Carolina Street
  • Harper, Mary, 141 _____
  • Harris, Georgia, 617 Stantonsburg Street
  • Haskins, Estelle, 505 West _____
  • Haskins, Mandy, 303 Varn [Barnes] Street
  • Haskins, Marie, 631 East Green Street
  • Holden, Carrie, 305 John Street
  • Holman, Thelma, 503 East Vance Street
  • Holt, Maggie, 113 Pender Street
  • Hooper, Ruther, 656 Viola Street
  • Howard, Mary, 110 Pender Street
  • Howard, Ophelia, 627 East Green Street
  • Hunt, Lulu, County Road
  • [H]ussey, Rhoda, 634 [East] Nash Street
  • Jackson, Joseph, 619 East Green Street (son of Joseph and Annie Horton Jackson)
  • Jackson, Paul, 619 East Green Street (son of Joseph and Annie Horton Jackson)
  • Jeffreys, Luvinia, 702 Daniel Street
  • Johnson, Maizie Lee, 151 Sugg Street
  • Johnson, Winona, 418 East Nash Street
  • Jones, Alice, 825 Stantonsburg Street (daughter of Wesley and Martha Taylor Jones)
  • Jones, Margaret, 400 Washington Street
  • Jones, Julia, 700 Tarboro Street
  • Kittrell, Rosalie, 637 East Green Street
  • Lane, Archer, 7084 Green Street
  • Lane, Esther, 704 East Green Street
  • Langley, Harriet, 800 Viola Street
  • Lewis, John, 411 Vick Street
  • Lonze, Willis, 619 Vance Street
  • Lude, Martha, 119 Pender Street
  • Marshall, Inez, 315 Jones Street
  • McCoy, Henry, 23 Carolina Street
  • McPhail, Mary, 313 Vick Street
  • Melton, Maggie, 648 Mercer Street
  • Miller, Rebecca, 313 Goldsboro Street
  • Mimms, ___sie, Grabneck Street
  • Mitchell, Lester, 549 East Green Street
  • Moore, Samuel, 406 Wiggins Street
  • Morgan, Ella, 706 Green Street
  • Myselle, Mary, 307 Walnut Street
  • Norfleet, Ruth, 213 Lee Street
  • Norwood, Eliza, Route 4, Box 14-A
  • Oates, Rosa, 542 Narrow Way Street
  • [O’]Kelley, Gladys, 633 East Green Street
  • Palmer, Beatrice, 608 Viola Street
  • Parker, Maggie, 111 Ash Street
  • Parker, Marie, 901 _____
  • Pearce, Almira, 806 East Vance Street
  • Pitt, Elizabeth, 804 East Vance Street
  • Pur___, Alma, 413 Stantonsburg Street
  • Reed, Bruce, 601 East Green Street (son of J.D. and Eleanor Frederick Reid)
  • Rodgers, Alphonza, 607 Lodge Street
  • Sanders, Amelia, 143 East Street
  • Savage, Bedford, 623 Darehis [Dardens] Alley (daughter of Frank and Serena Woodard Savage)
  • Scarborough, Lucile, 1109 East Nash Street (daughter of Festus and Mary Parker Scarborough)
  • Scott, Mary, near Colored Gra. School
  • Scott, Sarah, Woodard Avenue
  • Selman, Francis, West Hines Street
  • Shaw, Willie, 209 Hackney Street
  • Simms, Essie, 509 Mercey [Mercer] Street
  • Speight, Bessie, 627 East Green Street (daughter of Jake and Rebecca Speight)
  • Spells, John, 133 Pender Street (son of John S. and Martha A. Gordon Spell)
  • Stephen, Elsie, 151 Lee Street
  • Stevens, Josephine, Lodge Street
  • Taylor, Gladys, Robinson [Robeson] and Reid Streets
  • Taylor, Mae, 9_6 Carolina Street
  • Taylor, Tilly, 515 East Green Street
  • Thigpen, Amanda, 603 East Elba Street
  • Thomas, Marie, 616 East Green Street (daughter of Charles and Sarah Best Thomas)
  • Utley, George, 39 East Green Street
  • Vick, George, 623 East Green Street (son of Samuel H. and Annie Washington Vick)
  • Washington, _____, 630 East Green Street (child of George and Cora Miller Washington)
  • Washington, James, 630 East Green Street (son of George and Cora Miller Washington)
  • Weeks, Marie, 131 Pender Street (daughter of Rev. Alfred and Annie E. Weeks)
  • White, Patsy, Grabneck Street
  • Wilkins, Hattie, 414 East Lodge Street (daughter of Redden S. and Mary Hines Wilkins)
  • Williams, Dorthea, Rountree Street
  • Williams, Helen, 411 [South] Goldsboro Street
  • Williams, Mattie, 204 Wiggins Street
  • Williams, Nettie, Stantonsburg Road
  • Woodard, Almira, 119 Ash Street
  • Woodard, Herbert, 22 Harper Street

Stantonsburg

  • Applewhite, Alberta
  • Applewhite, Cherry (daughter of George and Jane Edmundson Applewhite)
  • Artis, Estelle
  • Artis, Nora
  • Barnes, Bessie
  • Barnes, Cora
  • Barnes, Hattie
  • Barnes, James
  • Batts, Ada
  • Foster, Mamie
  • Hagans, Luvinia (daughter of Dave and Almeta Ellis Hagans)
  • Hall, Oliver (son of James and Henrietta Hall)
  • Jones, Agnes
  • Jones, Albert
  • Jones, Ernest
  • Jones, Roscoe
  • Locus, Naomi
  • Lucus, Emma
  • Miller, Sarah
  • Newsome, Valdena
  • Reid, Loumiza (daughter of William and Bettie Wilson Reid)
  • Ward, James
  • Ward, Sarah
  • Whitley, Beatrice (daughter of Titus and Ida Whitley)
  • Whitley, Benjamin (son of Titus and Ida Whitley)
  • Winstead, Isaac (son of James Woodard and Annie Liza Winstead)
  • Winstead, Camuel [Samuel?]
  • Winstead, Mena (daughter of Mandy Winstead)
  • Yelverton, Ada (daughter of Ivory and Annie Taylor Yelverton)
  • Yelverton, Albert
  • Yelverton, Claude (son of Ivory and Annie Taylor Yelverton)
  • Yelverton, Henry (son of Ivory and Annie Taylor Yelverton)

Bazaar to benefit the hospital.

Wilson Daily Times, 7 December 1916.

A few years after it opened, friends of the Wilson Colored Hospital (later known as Mercy) held a pop-up shop of sorts in the Odd Fellows Hall on East Nash Street to raise money for indigent tuberculosis patients. On offer, clothing, but mostly undoubtedly delicious food — barbecue, chicken salad, oysters, sausages, sandwiches, sweets and ice cream.

Getting milk from the Vicks.

Excerpt from my interview with my grandmother, Hattie Henderson Ricks, about where her family bought food during her childhood on Elba Street:

“But when I was a little girl, the only place you could get milk was from the Vicks. It was a quarter.  That was the only place we had to get the milk, if you got any. Unless you used canned milk. She had a back porch. Closed-in back porch. Screened in. Anyway, glass in it all around, there on the back porch, and tables out there. One of them things you churn, what I mean, a great, old big urn out there where the milk get too old, and then she’d have buttermilk. And she had a ‘frigerator sitting out there, where she’d taken the shelves out, look like where she’d made a big thing to put it in there. But she would get fresh milk everyday. The cows was somewhere out there, I don’t know where, I didn’t see ‘em in the yard. They wont nowhere up there. But somebody was working for them would go out and get the milk and bring it in these cans where you have, where got the churn in the top of it. And she would put them out there on the porch. Miz Annie seemed to be pretty clean, and the house was clean. Didn’t nobody get sick. Yeah, and they had the two daughters, and I don’t know how many boys it was. Robert was the youngest boy, and I went to school with him, and Doris and I was in the same class in school. And — I didn’t know whether she was a sister to the man, or whether she was sister to the lady, I never did find out which way — but that house, they built that two-story house right next to the Vicks, and they didn’t stay in it, they went to Washington or somewhere. And they rented the house out. And I think somebody else bought it.”

My grandmother, right, and her sister Mamie Henderson Holt, around the time their family was buying milk from the Vicks.

All rights reserved.

It’s got a little twang to it.

Jesse A. Jacobs Jr. worked as a janitor at Five Points (later Winstead) School and did gardening odd jobs at the home of school superintendent Charles L. Coon. His great-niece Hattie Henderson Ricks, whom he adopted, told this story:

“Papa was up there cutting grass. ‘Go in the house, and ask ‘em for some water, a pitcher.’  Talking ‘bout my daddy wanted some water. And the first time I ever seen a grapefruit was there.  I said I’d never forget that.  ‘Cause I went in that house and asked for some water, and I said ‘Daddy said’ – I called him Papa.  Anyway, ‘he wanted to know if he could have some water.’  And the lady said, ‘Yeah,’ and she got a pitcher and a glass.  And I took it on out there, and then I just sit on the steps.  So Papa stopped and drinked him some water. But I was just standing there while they was fixing the water, and I looked on that table, and all ‘round the table there by the plate they had a salt cellar and half a grapefruit and a cherry sitting in the middle.  And that thing just looked so pretty, looked so good.  And I said, ‘Unh, that’s a big orange!’ I said, ‘Well, next time I go to the store I’m gon get me one, too.’  And sho’ nuff, I asked Papa, when we left – I don’t remember whether it was, it wont that particular time, but we come out and were on our way to Edmundson’s store in Five Points, and he wanted me to go in and get a plug of tobacco. Part of a plug.  And tell Old Man Edmundson to put it on the bill. So he waited, he was out there on a wagon, he had a little horse, and I went in and told Mr. Edmundson Papa wanted a, whatever amount it was, he didn’t get a whole plug, ‘cause I think it was three or four sections to a plug of tobacco, and for him to put it on the bill, and I said, ‘He said I could have a orange.  And put that on the bill.’  And it was boxes sitting up – I’ll never forget it – the boxes sitting up with all the oranges sitting up in there.  And I got the biggest one out of the group.  The one that wasn’t even orange.  I made sure I was gon get me a big orange!  I got that and come on back out there and got on the wagon and coming from Five Points to almost home, I was peeling that thing and peeling it ‘til I got it off, and it was sour, ‘Ugh, that’s a sour orange!’  I never seen a orange that sour. And I said, ‘Now, that didn’t look like, that’s a light-complected … yellow.’ But it was still like a orange, and it was so big.

“From then on I didn’t want no big orange. Now I always get little oranges. Today I don’t buy no big orange.  ‘Cause the little ones is sweeter than the big ones.  But, honey, that was a grapefruit, and that was the first I’d ever known it was a grapefruit.  We ain’t never had no grapefruit.  And so, I told Mama that was a, ugh, sour orange.  And I told her ‘bout what the Coons had on their table when I went up there.  And she said, ‘Well, that was a grapefruit.’  ‘A grapefruit?,’  I said, ‘well, what’s a grapefruit?’  And she said, ‘It’s like a big orange.  But you have to put sugar on it most time.  It’s a little sour.  It’s got a little twang to it.’  She said, ‘But your daddy didn’t never like none, so I don’t care that much about it.’  And I said, ‘A grapefruit?  I got myself a grapefruit.’  I said, ‘The cherries, where they get the cherries?,’ I said. ‘That little red thing where was on there.’  She said, ‘Well, you buy ‘em in bottles from the store.’ But, anyway, it was sour, but I learned the taste, you put a little sugar on it, makes a little bit sweeter.  I swear, Lord, I think about those things that I did when I was little.”

——

The house with the grapefruit was at 109 North Rountree Street in Wilson’s College Park neighborhood. Charles L. Coon’s house has been demolished, but was catalogued in Bainbridge and Ohno’s Wilson, North Carolina: Historic Buildings Survey (1980):

“This house was built c.1915 for Wilson’s foremost educator, Charles L. Coon. He served as superintendent of the Wilson Graded School from 1907 until his death in 1927 and was County School superintendent for the last fifteen years of this period. Coon, credited with the creation of a model school system in Wilson, also served on the North Carolina Child Labor Committee, the State Teachers Assembly, the editorial board of the North Carolina Historical Review and was the author of North Carolina Schools and Academies 1790-1840 and Public Schools of Wilson County. His house is sturdy and simple. The tile roof is unusual in a house of this vintage, and it enriches the texture of the facade. The front porch was constructed in typical Bungalow style, with square flared columns supporting the overhanging hipped roof.”

——

Hattie H. Ricks, circa 1920, probably a few years after she first tasted grapefruit.

Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory (1916).

  • Plug tobacco is made by pressing cured tobacco in a sweet (often molasses-based) syrup. The resulting sheet of pressed tobacco was cut into “plugs.” Edmundson likely carried locally manufactured product.

Adapted from interview of Hattie Henderson Ricks by Lisa Y. Henderson, all rights reserved.

Negro curb market.

6 17 1942.png

Wilson Daily Times, 17 June 1942.

Wilson Daily Times, 21 August 1942.

Where we shopped: Hill’s Fish Market.

Wilson Daily Times, 22 August 1944.

Brothers William and Joseph Meade Hill owned and operated a fish market on East Nash Street near Pender (the site later of Dr. Julian B. Rosemond‘s dental office.) The market’s location assured that it served a mostly African-American clientele.

What curious text: “For Your Protection … Always let the little fishes that swim around our adv. dive down into your Telephone Directory or Radio Station WGTM and bring up your Seafood Telephone Number 3291. It’s a number that guarantees fresh seafood.”

“A white friend” speaks of Mrs. Mary Hagans.

WDT 8 12 1921 Mary Hagans

Wilson Daily Times, 12 August 1921.

——

Richard Hagans married Ann Faithful 1 May 1849 in Edgecombe County. Lemon S. Dunn was bondsman, and John Norfleet, witness.

In the 1860 census of Edgecombe County: Richard Hagans, 33, wife Alley, 31, and children Lawrence, 10, Laura, 8, Margaret, 6, Richard, 5, Neely, 3, and Charles Hagans, 3 months.

The family is not found in the 1870 census.

On 30 December 1874, Lawrence Hagan, 25, married Mollie Pender, 20, at the residence of William Woodard in Wilson County. Witnesses were R. Hagan, Dobson Powell and Anderson White.

In the 1880 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Laurence Hagans, 30, wife Mary, 24, and children James, 6, and Elizabeth, 3. Next door, Lawrence’s father Richard Hagans, 52, mother Alley, 51, and brothers Charley, 20, Julus, 16, Bisco, 14, Thomas, 11, and Joe, 1.

In the 1900 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Larnce Haggan, 49, wife Etha, 44, and children Joe, 21, Augustus, 19, Oscar, 18, Charlie, 16, Annie, 13, Connie, 10, Lena, 8, Mollie, 7, William L., 4, Minnie, 3, and Pattie, 1, and Lawrence’s widowed mother Alice, 70.

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Laurence Hagans, 60, wife Mary, 56, and children Laurence Jr., 16, Minnie, 4, and Pattie, 12. [N.B. Pattie Hagans married Julius F. Freeman Jr. in 1918 in Pulaski, Arkansas.]

In the 1920 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: Laurence Haggans, 70; wife Mary; 62; daughter Minnie, 23, and her children Lessie, 10, Mary, 8, Alliet, 6, and Rensie Comb, 4; son Joe Haggans, 35; son-in-law William Pearce, 40, daughter Mollie, 28, and their children Samuel, 7, Ernestine, 4, Wood Roe, 3, and Cleveland, 18 months; grandson Donnie Haggans, 4; and adopted children Jim, 14, Dave, 20, and Ruth Hinton, 20.

Mary Hagans died 30 July 1921 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Her death certificate reports that she was 64 years old and was born in Tarboro to David and Phillis Pender. Her and her husband Lawrence Hagans farmed for Kerby Woodard.

Five months later, on 14 December 1921, Lawrence Hagans, 69, of Gardners township, son of Richard and Allie Hagans, married Maggie Slaughter, 56, of Ahoskie, at Maggie’s home in Toisnot township.

Lawrence Hagans, 75, died 9 April 1926 in Wilson township. His death certificate reports that he was working as a tenant farmer for W.H. Woodard and had been born in  Edgecombe County.

Lawrence & Mary Gray Pender

Lawrence and Mary Gray Pender Hagans.

Photo courtesy of user nikkinaya at www.ancestry.com