Month: July 2019

Nancy Newsome Baker of Indianapolis, Indiana.

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Indianapolis News, 30 November 1952.

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In the 1880 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Toney Newsome, 61; wife Jane, 41; and children Benjamin, 20, Mary, 13, Gastin, 11, and Nancy, 8.

On 17 April 1889, Benjamin Baker, 20, of Cross Roads township, son of Ephriam and Margaret Baker, married Nancy Newsom, 18, of Cross Roads township, daughter of Tony and Jane Newsom, in Cross Roads township.

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: widow Nancy Baker, 30, farmhand, and children Sarah J., 9, Tony, 7, and Stella, 3.

In the 1940 census of Center township, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: at 1058 Traub Avenue, Nancy Baker, 70, and Sarha Gregory, 70 [sic], boarders. Both women were born in North Carolina.

Nancy Baker died 28 November 1952 at her home at 908 South Penn Street, Indianapolis. Per her death certificate, she was born 18 August 1880 in Wilson County, N.C., to Tonie Newson; was a widow; and was buried in New Crown cemetery. Stella Maxwell was informant.

Sarah Gregory died 30 December 1966 in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 March 1891 in North Carolina to Benny Baker and Nancy Newsome and worked as a hotel maid.

Stella Maxwell died 17 October 2000 in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana. Per her death certificate, she was born 24 April 1900 to Ernest Thomlingson and Nancy Newson in Wilson, N.C.; was widowed; and was buried in New Crown cemetery.

Lynching going on, and there are men trying to stand in with the white folks.

Charles Stump was the pen name of Kentucky-born journalist Charles Stewart (1869-1925). By 1914, Stewart was working for the Associated Press and the National Baptist Convention and was known as “the press agent of the Negro race.” As Stump, Stewart reported to The Broad Axe, a black Chicago newspaper, his impressions of the areas through which he traveled. His 1918 sojourn through North Carolina coincided with the boycott of Wilson Colored Graded School.

Stump misreported principal J.D. Reid‘s name as A.D. Reed, but spared no words in describing his disdain for Reid’s conduct — “It is a small man who would strike a woman, but they have it down fine in Wilson, N.C., and if it is kept up much longer there will be some going home, but which home I am not prepared to say myself …. I never want to see a white man strike one of our best women in this world, for I would just then send word to the angels to dust my wings for I will be on my way for them, and then send word to the devil to heat the furnace just a little hotter, for I have started some one to take quarters therein.” Mary Euell, on the other hand, received her full due as “a refined, cultured, christian woman” with the “dignity of a queen.”

Stump’s account contains new details of Reid’s actions and the startling news that Reed’s karmic redress included the public slap of his ten year-old daughter Thelma by white merchant W.D. Ruffin.

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The Broad Axe (Chicago, Ill.), 26 July 1919.

Barbershop notices.

Barbershops serving white clients charged uniform prices and operated uniform hours in the 1930s and 1940s.

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Wilson Daily Times, 3 July 1935.

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Wilson Daily Times, 29 July 1941.

Per the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory:

  • Mullen’s Barber Shop (W Clarence Mullen) bsmt 113 E Nash
  • Red’s Barber Shop (John W Hawkins and O’Berry B Stevens) 113 S Goldsboro
  • Fields Nathan T barber 117 1/2 E Barnes h305 E Nash R7
  • Service Barber Shop (c; Clifton L Hardy) 113 S Tarboro
  • Taylor’s Barber Shop
  • Wm. Hines Barber Shop
  • Walter S. Hines Barber Shop
  • Cherry Hotel Barber Shop (Thos Williams; c) 317 E Nash

 

Aaron Barnes dies.

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Wilson Daily Times, 2 August 1910.

Perhaps, in the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Aaron Barnes, 60; wife Adline, 50; and niece Effie, 10.

Or perhaps, in the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Aaron Barnes, 62; wife Tilda, 55; sons Robert, 21, and Aaron, 18; and grandchildren James, 18, and Carrie, 10.

Moore returns home.

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New York Age, 28 July 1910.

Earnest Moore who recently came here from Livingston college returned to his home at Wilson, N.C., on last Friday; a sudden illness of his mother was the cause.”

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: merchant Lee Moore, 36, wife Louisa, 32, and son Ernest, 12.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Nash Street, life insurance agent Lee Moore, 40; wife Mary, 36; and son Earnest, 19.

 

The strange affairs of Silas Parker.

Silas Parker died without a will in 1914, and two years later his 51-acre tract went up for sale at public auction to pay his debts. His widow Mahalia Parker, who served as administratrix of his estate and filed the petition to sell, was high bidder at $500. The couple’s children were Maggie V. Parker, Mary B. Parker, John W. Parker, Mack McKinley Parker, Este Parker, Jerry D. Parker, Bertha Parker, Anna Parker, Sarah J. Parker and Adeline P. Parker.

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Via Dickensian proceedings, Silas Parker had inherited most of this tract of land from his uncle, Jerry Dunn.

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In the 1870 census of Upper Town Creek township, Edgecombe County: Toney Parker, 41; wife Julia, 34; and children Harry, 10, Silas, 10, Bray, 8, William, 5, Mary, 3, and George, 3 months.

Also, in the 1870 census of Upper Town Creek, Edgecombe County: farm laborer Jerry Dunn, 48; wife Sarah, 40; and Silas Parker, 8. (Next door: Zania Hill, 43, and daughter Della, 17.)

In the 1880 census of Upper Town Creek township, Edgecombe County: farmer Jere Dunn, 60; wife Sarah, 55; and nephew Silas Parker, 21, laborer.

In early 1881, Jerry Dunn drafted his last will and testament:

State of North Carolina Edgecomb County I Jary Dunn thankin God that I am in Good Bodily helth and sound mind do acknowlege this my last Will and testemaning that I do give unto Silas Parker after the deth of my self and my beloved Wife sara Dunn a serten tract of land containing forty one acres known as the Boiten Wilaford tract Joanding the lands of Boston Armstrong and others to him the said Silas Parker to have and In Joy forever as he may ce cause I Jarey Dunn in Presans of God and Witnss have hear to set my hand and seal the 9 day of Januarey AD 1881 Jarey X Dunn Witness Jesse W. Williams Richard X Wilkins

On 20 December 1888, Silas Parker, 27, of Nash County, son of Toney Parker of Wilson County and Julia Parker, married Mahala Parker, 20, of Nash County, daughter of Ruffin Parker and Morning Parker, at Ruffin Parker’s in Nash County.

On 31 December 1888, Jerry Dunn, 65, of Toisnot township, son of Harry and Rachel Dunn, married Sarah Wilkins, 58, of Toisnot township, daughter of Daniel Pitt and Piney Wilkins, in Wilson township. Methodist minister J.H. Mattocks performed the ceremony, and Silas Parker and C.H. Darden witnessed. [Was this a second wife, also named Sarah?]

Jerry Dunn died in 1889, and the strangeness started. In August, attorneys Bunn & Battle filed this petition in Wilson County Superior Court on behalf of administrator D.L. Lancaster. The petitioner claimed that (1) Jerry Dunn was $800 in debt to Silas Parker; (2) the value of Dunn’s personal estate was only $50; (3) Dunn owned a 41-acre tract in Wilson County worth $300; (4) this land descended to Dunn’s children [sic] Ben Pitt, age 73 or 74, of Edgecombe County, Mariah Taylor, age 44 of Wilson County, Harry Atkinson, age 50, of Wilson County, Blount Atkinson, age 55, of Edgecombe County, Harriet Webb, wife of Eli, age 40, of Wilson County, Mills Atkinson, 64, of Edgecombe County; Dunn died intestate without wife or children; and Pitt, Taylor and Harry Atkinson conveyed their interest in Dunn’s estate to Silas Parker.

Eli and Harriett Webb filed an answer to the petition in October 1889. The opening paragraph was true, they acknowledged, but as to paragraph 1, Jerry Dunn was not carrying $800 in debt and owed nothing to Parker. Dunn had settled with Parker, paying him “every cent” he owed him and not incurred any new debt to Parker in the last three years. As to paragraphs 2 and 3, Dunn’s personal estate ought to be worth at least $250 and his land worth $450. As to paragraph 4, these were Dunn’s siblings, not his children, and none had signed over their interest to Parker. There was no need to sell Dunn’s land to pay his debts, which amounted to no more than $50, as his personal assets should cover them. Further, Mills Atkinson was a “lunatic” without a guardian.

At that point, it seems, Jerry Dunn’s will suddenly turned up. He was not intestate, after all. The will was entered into probate on 6 January 1890 in Wilson County Superior Court, and the whole game changed. The court dismissed the petition to sell land and began to transfer Dunn’s wealth to his sole heir under his will, Silas Parker. Parker was the sole buyer at the sale of Dunn’s personal property in December 1891, scooping up farm animals, some equipment and a bed. He also, of course, received Dunn’s 41 acres.

In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer Silas Parker, 38; wife Mahala, 31; and children Maggie, 9, Mary B., 7, John W.L., 5, McKilley, 3, and Estie, 1.

In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Wells Daws Avenue, farmer and teacher Silas Parker, 49; wife Mahalley, 41; and children Maggie, 19, May B., 17, John, 15, Mack M., 13, General Este, 11, Jerry B., 18, Bertha, 6, Anna, 4, Sarah, 2, and Addie P., 3 months.

Administrator’s bond for estate of Silas Parker, 21 February 1914.

On 13 December 1915, Mahala Parker filed the petition to sell land for assets, asserting that Silas Parker had died with about $1000 in outstanding debt; that all of his personal estate had been allotted to her as widow’s support; that she had paid down $600 of her husband’s debt; that at his death Silas Parker owned a 51-acre parcel in Toisnot township and a 3/4 acre parcel near Nashville, Nash County; that she and Silas’ children lived on the “old Silas Parker home place” and that two of the children were adults and the rest minors; and that sale of the land was necessary.

Undated notice from estate file of Silas Parker, probably published in the Wilson Daily Times.

On 6 January 1916, William Battle, 21, of Edgecombe County, son of Jackson and Hannah Battle, married Bell Parker, 20, of Toisnot township, daughter of Silas and Mahalia Parker. Minister of the Gospel Samuel Burston performed the ceremony at Mahala Parker’s in Toisnot in the presence of Sidney Cotton, George Armstrong and Kinley Battle.

On 4 September 1918, John W. Parker, 24, son of Silas and Mahalia Parker, married Indiana Terry, 22, daughter of Henderson and Mary Terry, in Toisnot township.

Mahala Parker died 13 October 1921 in Toisnot township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was the widow of Silas Parker; was about 51 years old; and was born in Nash County to Ruffin Parker and Mourning Joyner. Informant was Mack Parker, Elm City.

On 22 November 1935, Estee Parker, 30, son of Silas and Mahala Parker, married Irene Davis, daughter of Ellis and Bessie Davis, in Greenville County, Virginia.

On 17 June 1936, David King, 21, of Wilson, son of Peter King and Freay (last name unknown), married Adlena Parker, 23, of Wilson, daughter of Silas Parker and Mahala Parker. Missionary Baptist minister Charles T. Jones performed the ceremony at James Alston‘s on Green Street in Wilson in the presence of Mag Parker, James Alston and Mary Whitely.

Jerry Parker died 5 July 1938 on the Parker farm, Toisnot township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 10 February 1902 in Wilson County to Silas Parker of Wilson County and Mahala Parker of Nash County; was a farmer; and was buried in Parker cemetery. John Parker, Elm City, was informant.

Maggie McGeachy died 13 November 1953 in Sharpsburg, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 21 April 1883 in Wilson County to Silas Parker and Mahalia Parker; was married to Willie McGeachy; and was buried in the Parker cemetery, Wilson County.

Mack McKinnley Parker died 20 May 1968 in Elm City, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 1 May 1899 to Silis Parker and Mahalia Parker; was a farmer; and was married to Minnie Parker. He was buried in the Parker cemetery in Wilson County.

Mary Bell Battle died 4 August 1971 in Hampton, Virginia. Per her death certificate, she was 77 years old; was the widow of William Battle; and was the daughter of Galas Parker and Mahalia (last name unknown). Informant was Willie Lee Battle, Rocky Mount, N.C.

John Parker died 22 January 1975 in Rocky Mount, Nash County. Per his death certificate, he was born 22 November 1892 to Silas Parker; was married to India Parker; and was retired. Walter Parker of Rocky Mount was informant.

Estate records of Jerry Dunn (1889 and 1890) and Silas Parker (1914), North Carolina Wills and Estates, 1665-1998 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Annie Parker Daniels, supercentenarian.

When Annie Parker Daniels celebrated her 100th birthday in 1994, no one could have predicted that she would be blessed with eleven more!

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Wilson Daily Times, 22 February 1994.

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Wilson Daily Times, 18 February 1997.

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Wilson Daily Times, 18 February 1999.

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Wilson Daily Times, 8 March 2000.

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Wilson Daily Times, 20 February 2002.

Shortly after her 109th birthday, the Daily Times ran a more in-depth feature on the remarkable Annie Daniels. Among the details: her parents worked a farm near the present location of New Hope Missionary Baptist Church on N.C. Highway 58 North; she joined Ellis Chapel Free Will Baptist Church in 1904 and remained a lifelong member; she attended Battle School; she did housework, cooking and childcare for Eunice Williams; she was the oldest of twelve children; she married Herman Daniels in 1912 [actually, 1913] and had four children [who survived infancy] before he died in 1933.

Wilson Daily Times, 17 March 2003.

Wilson Daily Times, 29 October 2005.

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On 17 August 1913, Herman Daniel, 21, of Wilson, married Annie Parker, 19, of Wilson, at J.B. Vick’s residence.

Moses Daniel died 26 July 1915 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 11 March 1914 in Wilson County to Herman Daniel and Annie Parker.

In the 1920 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: tenant farmer Herman Daniel, 25; wife Annie, 22; and daughter Irene, 3.

The unnamed infant of Herman Daniel died 10 June 1920 in Wilson Township. Per his death certificate, he was born 3 June 1920 in Wilson County to Herman Daniel of Wilson County and Annie Parker of Nashville, Tennessee [sic]. Herman Daniel was informant.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Silver Lake Road, farmer Herman Daniel, 36, farmer; Annie, 30; and children Arene, 13, Lucy, 3, and David, 1.

Herman Daniel died 19 October 1934 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 35 years old; was born in Wilson County to George Daniel and Lucy Daniel; was a farmer; was married; and was buried in Rountree cemetery. Annie Daniel was informant.

In the 1940 census of Taylor township, Wilson County: widowed farmer Annie Daniel, 40, with children Lucy, 12, David, 10, and James, 9.

On 7 September 1955, James R[ogers] Daniel, 25, son of Herman and Annie Parker Daniel, married Myrtle Grace Winstead, 26, daughter of Charlie and Lillie Smith Winstead, in Wilson.

Lucy Daniels Fulghum Farr died 18 October 1966 in Durham, North Carolina. Per her death certificate, she was born 3 February 1927 in Wilson to Herman Daniels and Annie Parker; resided in Nashville, Nash County; and was married to Ernest Farr.

Annie Parker Daniels died 27 October 2005.

1400 Carolina Street.

The one hundred-thirteenth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; shotgun with hip-roofed porch and bungalow type posts; includes side hall; built for owner-occupant.” [I am not sure why this house is described as a shotgun, a form that by definition has no interior halls.]

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory: Patterson Wm (c; Bertha) housemn h 1400 Carolina

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1400 Carolina Street, owned and valued at $1000, butler Willie Patterson, 28; wife Bertha, 26; children Willie, 6, and William, 3; sister-in-law Bessie Langston, 15; and brother-in-law Thomas Langston, 15. [The Pattersons and Langstons appear in the 1940 federal census in Washington, D.C.]

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory: Delaney George (c; Marie) brklayer h1400 Carolina. Edward, Louis and William Delaney are also listed as residing at 1400 Carolina.

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Sidenote:

1400 Carolina Street holds great personal significance for me. In early 1965, my parents and I moved into 1401 Carolina Street, a small 1950’s era brick house rented from Henderson Cooke. Kenneth and Nina Darden Speight were living just across the street in 1400. (By then, Marie Delaney and family lived in 1402, a house George Delaney built for his family.) Off and on, until I was about three years old, Mrs. Speight provided daycare for me and my cousin. (She “kept” us, in the parlance of the day.) My earliest memory is being carried to 1400 early on a chilly morning, swaddled in a red blanket. Other memories of my days there come in snatches: a blue cardboard canister of Morton salt on a sunny kitchen table; an old-fashioned steam iron; Mr. Kenny’s aftershave bottles on a dresser; a Maxwell House snuff can; naps in the darkened back bedroom; snapdragons blooming at the edge of the flagstone walkway. Though I haven’t been inside this house in 45 years, I can still walk you through its layout with some precision. Come through the front door into a hallway. To your left, a door into a bedroom/sitting room. Ahead to the right, the bathroom addition visible at the edge of the photo above. Straight ahead, the back bedroom occupied by the Speights’ teenaged grandson, who was often pressed into ferrying me back and forth across the street. At the far end of the front room, a sort of walk-through closet — I recall a bag of wooden blocks kept there on a shelf — led into the only space about which I’m fuzzy. I’ll call it the middle room. It opened into the kitchen which, because its windows faced east, was bright in early morning. Was there a tiny screened porch off the back of the kitchen? I’m not sure, but the backyard — now grass and concrete — was crowded with delicious hog plum trees. At 1400 Carolina Street, Mrs. Speight and Mr. Kenny helped weave the cocoon of security in which I spent my earliest years in East Wilson, and I pay them tribute.

Me in front of 1400 Carolina Street in the spring of 1966.

Photo of house by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.