Travel

Sarah Shade visits her brother in Brooklyn.

Thirteen year-old Sarah L. Shade spent some time with her brother John A. Shade and sister-in-law Ruby Purcell Shade before the school year began in 1924.


New York Age, 18 October 1924.

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In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 535 Nash Street, Turner Stokes, 50, carpenter; wife Morah, 39; mother-in-law Martha Pitt, 83; and boarders Isac Shade, 44, drugstore manager; wife Estella, 38; and children Kenneth, 13, and Sarah, 9. [Estella Lane Shade was Isaac A. Shade‘s second wife. His first marriage, to Emma Green Shade, apparently ended in divorce.]

On 9 September 1937, Sarah Luvenia Shade, 27, of Wilson, daughter of I.A. Shade and Estella Shade, married Richard Clyde Minor, 27, of Columbus, Ohio, son of Richard C. Minor and Alice G. Minor, in Wilson. A.M.E. Zion minister Richard A.G. Foster performed the ceremony in the presence of Thelma B. Foster, Norma E. Darden, and C.L. Darden.

In the 1940 census of Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri: at 809 East Dunklin, university professor Richard C. Minor, 40; wife Sara, 28; and boarder Rubye Harris, 20, university music teacher. [Richard Minor and Harris taught at Lincoln University.] Both Minors reported having lived in Salisbury, N.C., five years earlier.

The Lincoln Clarion (Jefferson City, Missouri), 30 October 1942.

Sarah L. Shade died 5 March 1992 in Wilson. [She reverted to her maiden name after divorce.] Per her death certificate, she was born 10 November 1910 in Asheville, N.C., to Isaac Albert Shade and Estelle Lane.

 

The waiting rooms.

As discussed here, the Atlantic Coast Line’s handsome passenger rail station was the point of departure for many African-Americans leaving Wilson during the Great Migration. Now an Amtrak stop, the station was restored and renovated in the late 1990s.

Here’s the station’s main waiting room today. Through a doorway, a sign marks a second room for baggage.

Into the 1960s, though, the baggage area was the train station’s “colored” waiting room.

Photos by Lisa Y. Henderson, June and September 2021.

Excursion ends in collision.

Wilson Daily Times, 13 August 1914.

Train trips to nearby cities, known as “excursions,” were popular entertainment well into the 20th century. 

  • Mary Price
  • James Henry
  • Frank Savage — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Viola Street, odd jobs laborer Frank Savage, 25; wife Serina, 22, cook; and daughters Marthy, 3, and Eva, 10 months.
  • Monk Hargrove — in the 1925 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hargrove Monk (c) lab 803 Viola

Millie Locus leaves Kansas.

Manhattan (Ks.) Republic, 5 July 1923. 

Was this Millie Locus the daughter of Wiley and Avie Taylor Locus? If so, what was she doing in Manhattan, Kansas?

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In the 1900 census of Nahunta township, Wayne County: farmer Wiley Locus, 44; wife Avey, 31; children Hyman, 12, Annie, 10, Mary, 9, Millie, 6, Wade H., 2, and Emma, 9 months; and boarder Silvia Taylor, 15.

In the 1910 census of Nahunta township, Wayne County: Willie Locust, 56; wife Avie, 45; “husband’s son” Hyman H.R., 22; children Sylva, 25, Annie, 18, Mollie, 17, Millie, 16, Emma, 11, Wade A., 12, Leona, 8, Clinton, 6, Levi E.D., 5, and Isiacar, 1 month; and grandson Kilgo, 4, and David Locust, 1.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on West Nash Street, A.D. Woodard, 60, widow, and lodgers G.S. Willard, 25, high school teacher; C.G. Shreve, 30, high school teacher; and Millie Locus, 30, cook.

Millie Locus died 3 August 1968 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 10 August 1900 in Wayne County, N.C., to Wiley Locus and Avie Taylor; was never married; and lived at 305 North Vick. Leora Hines, 812 East Hines, was informant.

Governor’s Day attendees.

Baltimore Afro-American, 11 June 1938.

William and Ethel Cornwell Hines, “Mrs. M. Darden” (probably Naomi Duncan Darden), and Flossie Howard Barnes traveled to Richmond, Virginia, in 1938 to attend a Governor’s Day program. (I have no information on either the purpose of the program or why North Carolinians would have been interested.)

No Negroes on the jitney.

Wilson Daily Times, 13 May 1920.

First, “jitney” — a vehicle providing inexpensive shared transportation over a set route. In this case, round-trip travel between Wilson and Goldsboro, some 25 miles south. Second, the jitney was integrated in 1920?

Now the story: an African-American passenger aboard the jitney “made himself  obnoxious” — which could have been anything from refusing to yield to seat to whistling loudly to … anything, short of actual criminal behavior, which would have been dealt with swiftly. White people threatened to boycott the service if they had to share space with “colored” people any longer. The jitney proprietor quickly acceded to their wishes and barred Black passengers. An unnamed “worthy colored man” of Wilson requested that the Daily Times post a notice of the change to “save [African-Americans] from worry,” i.e. humiliation, inconvenience, and dangerous annoyance. He himself had been denied passage when he attempted to board for a return from Goldsboro. To reassure any who questioned his motives, perhaps, the anonymous man asserted that he was not complaining of the jitney company’s action, that, in fact, he thought it just under the circumstances. 

[Note: Jim Crow, among other things, required a constant soft-shoe, relentless squaring, rapid-fire calculation, a perpetual mask. Consider this as you judge. — LYH]