Crime

Scouts solve a mystery.

Wilson Daily Times, 25 April 1933.

In this strange story, the family of a missing Rocky Mount man elicited the help of a local Boy Scout troop to find him. Having heard of an unidentified injured man lying in a Wilson hospital, the Lion Patrol, photo in hand, traveled to investigate. Physicians and undertakers (C.H. Darden and Sons, as it were) in Wilson confirmed deceased Junious “June” Mangum’s identity.

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Junious Mangum died 15 April 1933 at Mercy Hospital in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 40 years old; was born in Rocky Mount, N.C., to William Mangum and Ida Parker; was single; lived at 723 South Main [Rocky Mount?]; was a laborer; and was buried in Wilson. HIs cause and place of death: “compound fracture of skull (parietal and occipital h[illegible]” “A.C.L.R.R. tracks near Elm City.” 

Interracial cooperation in the bootlegging business.

Wilson Daily Times, 22 March 1944.

Briggs Hotel, like the Cherry, catered primarily to salesmen or other businessmen arriving to Wilson at the Atlantic Coast Line or Norfolk & Southern passenger rail stations. These men sometimes liked a good time, and taxi drivers and bellhops were a ready-made supply chain for after-hours liquor (and prostitutes.) Here, two white cabbies and three bellmen teamed up to resell at a sizeable mark-up liquor purchased at a local Alcoholic Beverage Commission store. (Probably the one in the 300 block of East Nash Street, recognized as North Carolina’s first ABC store.) 

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  • Theodore Burroughs
  • Prince Cunningham — Cunningham owned a sweet shop in the 500 block of East Nash in the 1930s.
  • Caesar Williams — in 1940, Caesar Julius Williams registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 12 February 1912 in Wilson; lived at 209 North Ashe Street; his nearest relative was mother Daisy Williams, same address; and he worked at Briggs Hotel, Nash Street. 

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

He made fight for the chief.

We read here several accounts of the fatal shooting of Phillip Worth by Wilson police chief Wiggs in April 1916. Below, the newspaper report of the coroner’s inquest into the matter.

Wilson Daily Times, 16 April 1916.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Craps game ends in deadly shooting.

In early March 1924, Tom Hagin allegedly shot Otto King to death over a cheating allegation during a game of craps. The Daily Times could not help but engage in casual racism in reporting the tragedy, referring to the dice game as “African golf.”

Wilson Daily Times, 4 March 1924.

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In the 1900 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Shandy King, 51; wife Nancy, 49; and children Jack, 21, Marcellus, 19, Shandey, 16, Mahala, 14, Columbus, 12, Otto, 7, and Harriett, 6. 

In the 1910 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Jim Bass, 19, and lodgers James Allen, 21, and Otto King, 19, all farm laborers.

In 1918, Otto King registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 22 March 1891 in Wilson; lived at Route 4, Wilson; worked in farming for Charley Walston; and was single.

Otto King’s World War I service record.

On 11 January 1919, Otto King, 26, of Saratoga township, son of Shandy King, and Roberta Taylor, 16, of Gardners township, daughter of Moses Fent and Rena Taylor, were married in Saratoga township, Wilson County.

In the 1920 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: on Plank Road Highway, farmer Otto King, 28, and wife Roberta, 17. 

“Shot through neck & lungs Homicide”

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Maggie Parker slays her infant daughter Maggie.

Wilson Daily Times, 24 April 1928.

Per her death certificate, baby Maggie Marie Parker‘s mother killed her with an auto spring. On 8 September 1928, the Times reported that charges against Maggie Parker had been dropped, and she had been sent to the state “insane asylum” in Goldsboro, North Carolina.  

“Killed with auto spring by the hands of mother”

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On 7 November 1920, Anthony Parker, 28, of Wilson, son of Anthony Parker and Bettie P. Barnes, married Maggie Taylor, 24, of Toisnot township, daughter of Callie and Marcellus Taylor, at the residence of William K. Taylor, Wilson. Primitive Baptist minister C.H. Hagans performed the ceremony in the presence of Andrew Rountree, Raiford Rountree, and Albert Farmer.

 

Raids on moonshiners.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 March 1941.

  • Stokey Manning 

In the 1940 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Stokey Manning, 23; wife Nina, 18; and son James, 3.

In 1940, Elbert “Stoky” Manning registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 16 August 1916 in South Carolina; lived at R.F.D. 1, Elm City; his contact was wife Nina Bannon Manning; and he worked for farmer T.J. Wiggins, R.F.D. 1.

  • Joe Hester

In the 1940 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: widower Joe Hester, 39; sons Jasper, 16, Walton, 14, and Elmer, 9; and siblings Annie, 21, Edward, 16, and Lawerence Hester, 19.

In 1942, Joe Hester registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 3 August 1900 in Granville County, N.C.; lived at Route #1, Taylors; his contact was W.H. Davis, Route 1; and he worked for farmer U.H. Cozart, Route 1.

  • Booker T. Farmer

On 18 September 1937, Booker T. Farmer, 21, of Gardners township, son of Robert and “Babe” Farmer, married Sarah Williams, 22, of Gardners township, daughter of Turner and Lula Williams, in Wilson.

In the 1940 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Booker T. Farmer, 23; wife Sarah, 24; and daughter Fannie, 2.

In 1940, Booker Washington Farmer registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 26 June 1916 in Edgecombe County, N.C.; his contact was wife Sarah Williams Farmer; and he worked for T.J. Wiggins, Elm City.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Annie May Barnes pleads guilty to manslaughter.

Wilson Daily Times, 8 February 1924.

  • Annie May Barnes
  • Will Daniels
  • Young’s Line 
  • Mary Blue
  • Claude Sessoms — Claud Sessoms died 28 February 1931 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 86 years old; was born in Nash County, N.C., to Jim Sessoms and Chaney Sessoms; was married to Elizabeth Sessoms; lived near Elm City; and worked in farming. 

 

 

Near murder.

Wilson Daily Times, 15 February 1917.

  • Clarence Carter — possibly, but not likely, Clarence L. Carter.
  • George Shaw — George Shaw registered for the World War I draft in 1917 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 22 June 1889 in Johnston County, N.C.; lived on Viola Street, Wilson; had a wife and child; and his occupation was “loafering & sick.” He had “1 bad eye — blind in it.”
  • Dr. Gilliam — Matthew S. Gilliam.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.