barber

Lane Street Project: G. Washington Joyner.

This marker in Odd Fellows cemetery is likely the footstone for the grave of George Washington Joyner, called “Wash,” a painter turned barber.

——

In the 1870 census of Upper Town Creek township, Edgecombe County: farm laborer Ned Joyner, 34; wife Edith, 22; and children Charles, 9, Mary, 7, John, 5, Toney, 2, and Hail Columbus, 1 month.

In the 1880 census of Upper Town Creek township, Edgecombe County: laborer Ned Joyner, 51; wife Eadie, 42; and children Charles, 19, Mary, 16, John, 14, Toney, 12, Lumm, 10, Wash, 7, Louiza, 5, Birt, 3, and Mirtina, 1.

On 7 October 1895, Geo. W. Joyner, 21, son of Ned and Edie Joyner, married Sarah Barnes, 18, daughter of Frances and Alex Barnes, in Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony in the presence of Dock Chandler, Alfonzo Graves, and J. Nelson Peacock.

In the 1908 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, painter, h 616 Viola.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: wagon factory laborer Willie Paulkin, 26, wife Pearl, 22, son Atric, 2, and brother Sam, 24, a wagon factory laborer; also house painter Wash Joyner, 35, wife Sarah, 32, a laundress, and son Alexander, 13.

In the 1912 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, barber, h 616 Viola.

In 1918, George Washington Joyner registered for the World War I draft. Per his registration card, he was born 15 April 1875; resided at 616 Viola Street; was a self-employed barber at 213 Goldsboro Street; and his nearest relative was Sarah Jane Joyner.

G.W. Joyner died 18 November 1918 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 1875 to Ned Joyner and Edith [last name not given]; was a barber; and he died in an automobile wreck. Sarah Joyner was informant.

The obituary of Frank W. Barnes.

Frank Washington Barnes was an East Wilson Renaissance man. Born in 1911 to Jesse R. and Sarah Barnes Barnes (who sold to the city the land that became Rest Haven Cemetery), he was a barber (early as an employee of Austin N. Neal‘s Carolina Barber Shop and later as owner of Sanitary Barber Shop at 516 East Nash); edited the Wilson community news for Raleigh’s weekly African-American newspaper The Carolinian; was a member of Jackson Chapel First Missionary Baptist Church; was a member of the NAACP; helped found the East Nash Volunteer Fire Department; and ran for political office. He was also affiliated with nearly every fraternal organization active in 20th-century Wilson: Mount Hebron Lodge 42, Prince Hall Masons; Peaceful Valley Lodge 272, Knights of Pythias; Hannibal Lodge #1552, Grand United Order of Odd Fellows; Esther Lodge 467, Household of Ruth; and Marshall Lodge 297, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

Wilson Daily Times, 23 March 1982.

Frank W. Barnes’ World War II draft registration card. (On the back, a notation that he was six feet five inches tall.)

 

Lane Street Project: Junius Peacock.

The race is on to find gravestones in Odd Fellows Cemetery before spring foliage engulfs them again. This little headstone was trapped under multiple bands of wisteria vine.

There were two Junius Peacocks, father and son. This marker most likely heads the grave of Junius Wesley Peacock, the son, who died in 1935.

——

In the 1880 census of : in the household of 27 year-old white farmer William Bynum, Henry Peacock, 30, works on farm; wife Zetta, 28; and children Henry, 12, John, 7, Junius, 5, Sarah, 4, and Emma, 2.

Junius Peacock, 22, of Wilson, son of Henry and Rosetta Peacock, married Nora Haskins, 17, of Wilson, daughter of Martha Haskins, on 30 March 1898 at Martha Haskins’ in Wilson. Primitive Baptist minister J.W. Williams performed the ceremony in the presence of J. Bradley Exum, Noah Tate, and C.B. Gay.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Junious Peacock, 23, bartender; wife Nora, 19; son Junious, 7 months; mother [in-law] Martha Haskins, 60, washing; sister[in-law] Addie, 34; and Addie’s children Rosko, 13, Nathan, 4, and Allen, 3.

In the 1912 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius (c) cook h E Chestnut

In the 1916 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius (c) elev opr Oettinger’s

In 1918, Junius Wesley Peacock registered for the World War I draft in Norfolk, Virginia. Per his registration card, he was born 30 December 1935; lived at 316 Kent Street, Norfolk; worked as a bellboy at a Turkish bath, 416 Atlantic Street; and his nearest relative was Nora Stokes, 535 East Nash Street, Wilson. [Nora Peacock, likely a widow, had married Turner Stokes in Wilson in 1916.]

Junius Peacock, 21, of Norfolk, Virginia, son of Junius and Nora Peacock, married Ethel Wilson, 22, of Norfolk, Virginia, daughter of F. and A. Wilson, in Norfolk, Virginia, on 24 October 1918.

In the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius W (c) barber h 524 E Nash

In the 1925 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius W (c) barber Coley & Taylor h 525 E Nash

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius (c; Ethel) barber Walter S Hines h 817 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 807 Green Street, barber Junius Peacock, 30, barber, and wife Ethel, 34, maid.

Junius Wesley Peacock died 28 April 1935 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 35 years old; was born in Wilson to Julius Peacock and Nora Haskins; was married to Ethel Peacock; lived at 817 East Green Street; and worked as a barber. 

Ethel M. Peacock died 25 May 1974 in Norfolk, Virginia. Per her death certificate, she was born 23 October 1893 in Norfolk to Fred Wilson and Ann Brooks; was the widow of Junius Peacock; and was buried in Chesapeake, Virginia.

Photos courtesy of Joseph Stair.

Wheeler family tragedy.

Misfortune dogged the Wheeler family for decades.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 March 1896.

Sidney Wheeler was a man, not a boy, and married nine months after this mishap. On 23 December 1896, Sidney Wheeler, 24, married Lou Armstrong, 20, in Wilson. W.T.H. Woodard performed the ceremony in the presence of Richard Renfrow, S.A. Smith and Janie Booth.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: day laborer Sidney Wheelus, 27; wife Lula, 23; and son Sidney, 8 months.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Sidney Wheeler, 40, barber; wife Lou, 40, private cook; and children Sidney, 9, Dave, 7, Floyd, 4, and Emma, 2.

In March 1910, Sidney Wheeler Jr. accidentally shot his sister in the head while playing with a gun. She died instantly. Their mother was away from home cooking supper for Frederick Woodard’s family; their father presumably was also at work. The Wheeler girl’s name is unknown. The 1900 census lists only one child; the 1910, only one daughter, Emma, who lived to adulthood. Though described as eight years old, Sidney Jr. was more likely about ten.

News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.), 17 March 1910.

Fourteen months later, Sidney Wheeler Jr. (still described as eight years old) was charged with assault with a deadly weapon against General Tyler, “another colored boy.”

Screen Shot 2019-04-26 at 9.20.33 PM.png

Wilson Daily Times, 19 May 1911.

The Daily Times published two articles about the incident. The second doubled down on the sensationalist editorializing, but there seems little question that Sidney Jr. engaged in unusually violent behavior.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 May 1911.

Six months later, a Raleigh paper picked up a local-interest bit from Wilson and printed it using the exaggerated dialect and descriptions saved for negro anecdotes. In a nutshell: Anderson Dew visited Sidney Wheeler’s barber shop. With half his face shaved, Dew attempted to spit. Wheeler warned there was no spitting while he was shaving. Further, there was the matter of Dew having  testified against Wheeler on a liquor charge. Dew distracted Wheeler’s attention, then jumped from the chair and ran off to tell this tale.

The Farmer and Mechanic (Raleigh, N.C.), 7 November 1911.

Sidney Wheeler died 8 March 1912 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 35 years old; was born in Nash County to Richard and Annie Wheeler; worked as a barber; was married; and resided at 710 Vance Street. Lula Wheeler was informant.

Six and-a-half years after their father died, Sidney Wheeler Jr.’s younger brother Dabbie fetched up in court on a breaking and entering charge. As he had already done time on a county road gang, the judge sentenced him to five-to-ten in the state penitentiary.

News & Observer, 7 September 1918.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Hackney Street, college cook Lula Wheeler, 49, widow, and children Richard, 12, Emma, 10, John, 8, and Sammie, 6.

Dabbie Wheeler died four years into his prison term of tuberculosis of the shoulder joint and bowels. He was 17.

Dabbie Wheeler died 21 June 1922 at the State Penitentiary in Raleigh, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born 27 August 1904 in Wilson to Sidney Wheeler and Lula Armstrong and worked as a laborer. He was buried in Chapel Hill.

Ten months later, Sidney Wheeler Jr. escaped from a prison camp near the Rocky Face Mountain quarry in Alexander County, North Carolina. I have found nothing further about him.

Alamance Gleaner, 5 April 1923.

Lulu Wheeler died 5 May 1925 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 11 August 1878 in Elm City to Emma Armstrong; she was the widow of Sid Wheeler; she resided at 523 Church Street; and she did housework for Atlantic Christian College. Emma Wheeler was informant.

The twin Gastons.

Screen Shot 2019-03-30 at 10.10.33 PM.png

Wilson Advance, 21 April 1892.

The Gaston twins were John A. Gaston and George A. Gaston. George established perhaps the leading barber shop in Elm City, seven miles north of Wilson. Though John was sometimes referred to as “Twin Gaston,” this ad, with Gastons plural, suggests that the brothers were in business together in Wilson at least briefly.

——

In the 1870 census of Kinston, Lenoir County, North Carolina: brickmason George Gaston, 53, wife Matilda, 30, and 13 year-old sons George and John, both farm laborers.

In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County: brickmason George Gaston, 60, wife Matilda, 44, and son John, 23, a farm laborer. John’s twin George Gaston, 23, barber, is listed by himself in the 1880 census of Town of Toisnot, Wilson County.

Hines brothers’ barber shops.

Wilson Daily Times, 22 August 1947.

In addition to his business and real estate interests, William Hines for decades served as secretary-treasurer and general administrator of Mercy Hospital. This photograph, which probably dates from the mid-1950s, depicts Hines flanked by Helen James, nursing director, and Anna Burgess Johnson, hospital board member. Photo courtesy of O.N. Freeman Round House and Museum.

Wiley Ricks is still barbering.

Wilson Daily Times, 13 October 1980.

Wiley Ricks and young customer.

——

In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Millie Ricks, 40, widow, with sons William, 12, and Wiley, 1.

In the 1910 census

On 27 July 1918, Wiley Ricks, 21, of Toisnot, married Fannie Fort, 21, of Toisnot, in Elm City. Presbyterian minister A.E. Sephas performed the ceremony in the presence of John Gaston, Samuel T. Ford and T.H. Nicholson.

Fannie Ford Ricks died 9 March 1924 in Elm City, Toisnot township. Per her death certificate, she was born 11 January 1899 in Wilson County to Sam Ford of Halifax County and Mattie Williams of Wilson County and was married to Wiley Ricks.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Wiley Ricks, 30, barber; wife Carrie, 29; and children Miriam, 2, and Maggie, 9 months.

In the 1940 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Branch Street, barber Wiley Ricks, 41; wife Cary P., 39; and children Miriam, 12, Maggie R., 10, Lois, 8, and Malinda, 1.

Wylie Ricks died 28 March 1985 in Hollister, Halifax County, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born 4 December 1898 in Wilson County to Wiley Sharpe and Millie Sharpe; was a barber; resided in Elm City; and was married to Carrie Parker Ricks.

Screen Shot 2018-08-03 at 8.52.27 PM.png

A 1947 photo taken outside Wiley Ricks’ barbershop. Courtesy of Thomas Griffin via Wilson Daily Times, 15 January 2002.

Haircut photo courtesy of article re Ricks in History of Wilson County, North Carolina (1985).

Roscoe Harvey gets along with everybody.

Screen Shot 2018-12-22 at 9.25.29 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-12-22 at 9.24.47 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-12-22 at 9.25.03 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-12-22 at 9.26.56 PM.png

Wilson Daily Times, 8 August 1994.

  • Roscoe Lee Harvey — in the 1910 census of Lumberton, Roberson County: Lonnie L. Harvey, 31, wife Rosa L., 24, and son Rosco, 5.

In the 1920 census of Lumberton, Roberson County: Rosa Harvey, 32, cook, and son Roscoe, 14.

In the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Harvey Love barber 114 E Barnes h 410 E Walnut; (also) Harvey Roscoe L barber Love Harvey 114 E Barnes h 410 E Walnut

In the 1926 Polk’s Tampa, Florida, city directory: Harvey Roscoe L barber Lee Davis r 301 Hillsborough

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Harvey Roscoe barber r 1112 Carolina

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Harvey Love L (c; Mollie) r 507 Banks; (also) Harvey Roscoe (c) barber r 507 Banks

On 27 June 1930, Roscoe Lee Harvey, 24, son of Lony Harvey of Wilson and Rosa L. Clark of Florida, married Helen McMillan, 20, daughter of Morris and Victoria McMillan, in Wilson. Rev. G.J. Branch of the United Holy Church of America performed the ceremony in the presence of Anderson Holden, Levi Godwin and Haywood Townsend.

In 1940, Roscoe Lee Harvey registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he resided at 724 East Green, Wilson; was born 5 July 1905 in Lumberton, N.C.; his contact was wife Helen McMillan Harvey; and was self-employed at 114 East Barnes.

On 7 July 1947, Roscoe Lee Harvey, 42, son of Lonnie Lovelace Harvey and Rosa Lee Harvey, married Rowena Stephenson, 26, daughter of Deans and Hattie Stephenson, in Wilson.

Roscoe Lee Harvey Sr. died 17 August 2003 in Charlotte, North Carolina.

  • Carolina Stompers
  • Cherry Apartments — in the mid-1980s, Wilson Housing Authority renovated the former Hotel Cherry to create 108 apartments for senior citizens. See Wilson Daily Times, 20 October 1994, page 3.
  • Fred Artis — “Fred Artis Jr., son of the late Fred and Mattie Artis, was born March 17, 1916. He and his sister, Christine Currie, who preceded him in death, lived all of their lives in Wilson, NC. Fred departed this life on Monday, September 18, 2000.” Wilson Daily Times, 21 September 2000.

Fred Artis Jr.

  • Louis Perrington — Louis Alexander Manuel Perrington. “March 14, 1914 Dec. 5, 2001 Louis Alexander Perrington, 87, of 702 Elvie St., died Wednesday at his residence. The funeral will be conducted by the Rev. William L. Neill at 2 p.m. on Sunday at St. John AME Zion Church, 119 N. Pender St. Burial will follow at Rest Haven Cemetery. Perrington was a member of St. John AME Zion Church and Mount Hebron Masonic Lodge No. 42. He was retired from the Cherry Hotel. He is survived by his wife, Pearlean Barnes Perrington; one daughter, Jean Perrington-Ballard of Raleigh; one sister, Wilhelmenia Smith of Portsmouth, Va.; two grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.” Wilson Daily Times, 8 December 2001.

Your father probably taught you to do this.

In 1924, “White Barbers of Wilson” placed an ad in the Daily Times complaining of white customers — women, even — patronizing African-American barber shops. Hair-cutting had  long been dominated by black men, and white barbers keenly felt the loss of caste that their trade entailed. After chastising “the public” for going to “dark skin shops,” they shook a challenging finger: “Ladies and gentlemen, we believe when you see the thing the way we do you will be a full blooded Southerner, and join the ranks of a true born American citizen.”

201809082028138771.jpg

Wilson Daily Times, 5 September 1924.