barber

The obituary of Haywood W. Baker, barber and restaurateur.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 August 1946.

Per records, Haywood Baker was born in Greene County, North Carolina, and lived in Pitt, Nash, and Wilson Counties as well. In addition to Wilson, he owned barber shops in Stantonsburg and Farmville. Presumably, “first white restaurant in Stantonsburg” meant the first to cater to a white clientele. I have not identified the location of his tailor shop.

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On 5 November 1898, Haywood Baker, 20, son of Richard and Almira Baker, married Ora Harper, 19, daughter of Thomas and Leah Harper, in Greene County.

In the 1900 census of Carrs township, Greene County: farmer Haywood Baker, 22; wife Orra, 20; daughter Lula, 6 months; and widowed mother-in-law Laurer Harper, 54.

In the 1910 census of Farmville township, Pitt County: self-employed barber Haywood W. Baker, 30; wife Ora, 29; daughter Lular, 10; and adopted son Stiner, 9.

On 13 November 1912, Haywood Baker, 33, of Nash County, son of Richard and Milie Baker, married Mollie Vines, 26, of Nash County, daughter of Charles and Mahala Vines, in Nash County.

Doris M. Baker died 22 April 1917 in Stantonsburg, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 3 October 1916 in Wilson County to H.W. Baker and Mollie Vines and buried in David graveyard. H.W. Baker was informant.

In 1918, Haywood William Baker registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he resided in Stantonsburg; was 24 February 1870; worked as a barber; and his nearest relative was Mollie Baker.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on Railroad Street, Haden [Haywood] W. Baker, 40, barber; wife Mollie, 33; and children Hilda R., 6, Jasper, 4, Harold, 2, Mary C., 2 months; and Haywood, 12; plus Exum Joyner, 25, barber, and wife Bertha, 24.

An unnamed child died 17 June 1922 in Stantonsburg, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 20 days old and was born in Wilson County to Hawood W. Baker and Mollie Vines. Informant was H.W. Baker. 

In the 1930 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Haywood W. Baker, 52; wife Mollie, 43; and children Charles, 17, Hildarene, 16, Jasper, 14, Harold, 13, Mary P., 11, Richard T., 7, and Carlton Baker, 5.

In the 1940 census of Farmville township, Pitt County: farmer Haywood W. Baker, 62, and children Jasper, 22, Tensley James, 26, Richard Thomas, 16, and Carlton Baker, 14, and Mary Joyner, 20. All reported living in Greene County in 1935 except Tensley, who had lived in Goldsboro, Wayne County.

On 21 October 1941, W.H. Baker, 63, of Farmville, Pitt County, son of Richard and Miley Baker, married Blanche Thomas, 47, of Wilson, in Snow Hill, Greene County, N.C.

In 1942, Richard Thomas Baker registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 24 August 1923 in Stantonsburg; resided at 719 East Green Street, Wilson; his contact was Haywood Baker of the same address; and he worked at G.H.T.M. in Goldsboro, North Carolina.

In 1943, Carlton Baker registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 26 May 1925 in Stantonsburg; resided at 718 East Green Street, Wilson; his contact was H.W. Baker; and he worked for J.E. Gregory, Southern Dairies, 200 Railroad Street, Wilson.

Haywood Baker died 17 August 1946 at Duke Hospital in Durham. Per his death certificate, he was born 14 February 1883 in Greene County; was married to Blanch Baker; resided at 719 East Green Street, Wilson; was a barber; and was buried in Marlboro cemetery, Farmville, Pitt County.

Jasper Bruce Baker died 25 August 1963 in Kinston, Lenoir County, N.C. Per his death certificate, he was born 17 December 1915 in Pitt County, N.C., to Haywood Baker and Mollie Vines; was married to Naomi Baker; lived at 1119 Oak Street, Kinston; and worked as a janitor at F.W. Woolworth.

Tensley James Baker died 3 May 1974 In Goldsboro, Wayne County, N.C. Per his death certificate, he was born 7 May 1911 to Haywood Baker and Ora Harper; was single; and was retired. Dock Baker was informant.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

The obituary of Junius Peacock, barber.

Wilson Daily Times, April 1935.

“The cemetery here” was Odd Fellows. Lane Street Project volunteers found Junius W. Peacock‘s grave marker during Season 1 of our cleanups.

[Personal sidenote: Peacock worked for and with my grandfather Roderick Taylor Sr. at Coley & Taylor and Walter Hines barbershops.]

Dispute at the cold drink stand.

Wilson Daily Times, 28 July 1911.

Johnny Matthews and Luther Barber [Barbour] were fined ten dollars each (or was it $22?) after an altercation over two bottles of Coca-Cola at Matthews’ cold drink stand on the Plank Road (roughly, Martin Luther King Parkway). State law prohibited the sale on Sunday of any goods other than “drugs, undertaking supplies, ice and those things absolutely necessary for the sick.”

Lane Street Project: G. Washington Joyner.

This marker in Odd Fellows cemetery is likely the footstone for the grave of George Washington Joyner, called “Wash,” a painter turned barber.

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In the 1870 census of Upper Town Creek township, Edgecombe County: farm laborer Ned Joyner, 34; wife Edith, 22; and children Charles, 9, Mary, 7, John, 5, Toney, 2, and Hail Columbus, 1 month.

In the 1880 census of Upper Town Creek township, Edgecombe County: laborer Ned Joyner, 51; wife Eadie, 42; and children Charles, 19, Mary, 16, John, 14, Toney, 12, Lumm, 10, Wash, 7, Louiza, 5, Birt, 3, and Mirtina, 1.

On 7 October 1895, Geo. W. Joyner, 21, son of Ned and Edie Joyner, married Sarah Barnes, 18, daughter of Frances and Alex Barnes, in Wilson. Missionary Baptist minister Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony in the presence of Dock Chandler, Alfonzo Graves, and J. Nelson Peacock.

In the 1908 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, painter, h 616 Viola.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: wagon factory laborer Willie Paulkin, 26, wife Pearl, 22, son Atric, 2, and brother Sam, 24, a wagon factory laborer; also house painter Wash Joyner, 35, wife Sarah, 32, a laundress, and son Alexander, 13.

In the 1912 Wilson city directory: Joyner Washington, barber, h 616 Viola.

In 1918, George Washington Joyner registered for the World War I draft. Per his registration card, he was born 15 April 1875; resided at 616 Viola Street; was a self-employed barber at 213 Goldsboro Street; and his nearest relative was Sarah Jane Joyner.

G.W. Joyner died 18 November 1918 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 1875 to Ned Joyner and Edith [last name not given]; was a barber; and he died in an automobile wreck. Sarah Joyner was informant.

The obituary of Frank W. Barnes.

Frank Washington Barnes was an East Wilson Renaissance man. Born in 1911 to Jesse R. and Sarah Barnes Barnes (who sold to the city the land that became Rest Haven Cemetery), he was a barber (early as an employee of Austin N. Neal‘s Carolina Barber Shop and later as owner of Sanitary Barber Shop at 516 East Nash); edited the Wilson community news for Raleigh’s weekly African-American newspaper The Carolinian; was a member of Jackson Chapel First Missionary Baptist Church; was a member of the NAACP; helped found the East Nash Volunteer Fire Department; and ran for political office. He was also affiliated with nearly every fraternal organization active in 20th-century Wilson: Mount Hebron Lodge 42, Prince Hall Masons; Peaceful Valley Lodge 272, Knights of Pythias; Hannibal Lodge #1552, Grand United Order of Odd Fellows; Esther Lodge 467, Household of Ruth; and Marshall Lodge 297, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

Wilson Daily Times, 23 March 1982.

Frank W. Barnes’ World War II draft registration card. (On the back, a notation that he was six feet five inches tall.)

 

Lane Street Project: Junius Peacock.

The race is on to find gravestones in Odd Fellows Cemetery before spring foliage engulfs them again. This little headstone was trapped under multiple bands of wisteria vine.

There were two Junius Peacocks, father and son. This marker most likely heads the grave of Junius Wesley Peacock, the son, who died in 1935.

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In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: in the household of 27 year-old white farmer William Bynum, Henry Peacock, 30, works on farm; wife Zetta, 28; and children Henry, 12, John, 7, Junius, 5, Sarah, 4, and Emma, 2.

Junius Peacock, 22, of Wilson, son of Henry and Rosetta Peacock, married Nora Haskins, 17, of Wilson, daughter of Martha Haskins, on 30 March 1898 at Martha Haskins’ in Wilson. Primitive Baptist minister J.W. Williams performed the ceremony in the presence of J. Bradley Exum, Noah Tate, and C.B. Gay.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Junious Peacock, 23, bartender; wife Nora, 19; son Junious, 7 months; mother [in-law] Martha Haskins, 60, washing; sister[in-law] Addie, 34; and Addie’s children Rosko, 13, Nathan, 4, and Allen, 3.

In the 1912 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius (c) cook h E Chestnut

In the 1916 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius (c) elev opr Oettinger’s

In 1918, Junius Wesley Peacock registered for the World War I draft in Norfolk, Virginia. Per his registration card, he was born 30 December 1935; lived at 316 Kent Street, Norfolk; worked as a bellboy at a Turkish bath, 416 Atlantic Street; and his nearest relative was Nora Stokes, 535 East Nash Street, Wilson. [Nora Peacock, likely a widow, had married Turner Stokes in Wilson in 1916.]

Junius Peacock, 21, of Norfolk, Virginia, son of Junius and Nora Peacock, married Ethel Wilson, 22, of Norfolk, Virginia, daughter of F. and A. Wilson, in Norfolk, Virginia, on 24 October 1918.

In the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius W (c) barber h 524 E Nash

In the 1925 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius W (c) barber Coley & Taylor h 525 E Nash

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Peacock Junius (c; Ethel) barber Walter S Hines h 817 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 807 Green Street, barber Junius Peacock, 30, barber, and wife Ethel, 34, maid.

Junius Wesley Peacock died 28 April 1935 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 35 years old; was born in Wilson to Julius Peacock and Nora Haskins; was married to Ethel Peacock; lived at 817 East Green Street; and worked as a barber. 

Ethel M. Peacock died 25 May 1974 in Norfolk, Virginia. Per her death certificate, she was born 23 October 1893 in Norfolk to Fred Wilson and Ann Brooks; was the widow of Junius Peacock; and was buried in Chesapeake, Virginia.

Photos courtesy of Joseph Stair.