disability

When they first arrive, they are wild.

wdt 8 25 1911.jpg

Wilson Daily Times,  25 August 1911.

Again, if you are interested in the wretched world of the Eastern North Carolina Insane Asylum, please read Susan Burch and Hannah Joyner’s Unspeakable, the story of Junius Wilson (1908-2001), a deaf African-American who spent 76 years there, including six in the criminal ward, though he had never been declared insane by a medical professional or found guilty of any criminal charge.

She left home without my consent.

WDT_9_17_1918_Floria_Faison

Wilson Daily Times, 17 September 1918.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County, on Vance Street, 49 year-old widowed laundress Ella Fason with daughters Mary, 18, Emma, 16, Henretta, 13, and Flory Fason, 10. Ella’s husband Patrick Faison died 1900-10.

——

Six years later, Ella Faison made out a pointed will leaving all her belongings to just one of her children:

Ella Faison will

Ella Faison died 6 June 1928. Her sole heir and executrix, Ida Faison Jones, wife of Sankey Jones, survived her by only six months. Flora Faison, however, lived till 1983.

North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database on-line], Ancestry.com.