Taylor

State vs. Amos Williams.

To stave off responsibility for caring for poor women and their children, unwed mothers were regularly brought before justices of the peace to answer sharp questions about their circumstances.

On 15 September 1866, Lucy Taylor admitted to Wilson County justice of the peace D.W. Barnes that she was pregnant and unmarried, and Amos Williams was her child’s father. Barnes ordered that Williams be arrested and taken to a justice to answer Taylor’s charge.

Amos Williams appeared with J.G. Williams and M.M. Williams to post a bond for his appearance at the next session of court.

In the 1870 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: Benjamin Tillery, 27; wife Cherry; and daughter Jane, 3; Lucy Taylor, 23, and son Columbus, 8 months; and Daniel Sharp, 26, farm laborer. [Columbus Taylor is not the child that was the subject of the above bastardy action.]

Bastardy Bonds, 1866, Miscellaneous Records, Wilson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

Studio shots, no. 200: Hattie Sutton Taylor Joyner.

Hattie Sutton Taylor Joyner (1877-1957).

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In the 1880 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Calvin Sutton, 25; wife Silvania, 26; children Hattie, 3, and twins Joel B. and Josephin, 1; mother Dolly, 55; brothers Dallow, 18, and Henry, 16; and sister Mary, 12.

On 20 December 1899, Frank Taylor, 21, of Wayne County, son of Alfred and Pleasant Taylor, married Hattie Sutton, 22, daughter of Calvin and Sylvania Sutton, at Calvin Sutton‘s house in Spring Hill township, Wilson County. Rev. W.H. Horton performed the ceremony in the presence of R.R. Braswell, A.B. Braswell, and L.H. Horton.

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Frank Taylor, 19;  wife Hattie, 23; and nephew Alfred, 7.

In the 1910 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: on Upper Black Creek Road, farmer Calvin Sutton, 54; wife Sylvania, 58; daughter Hattie Taylor, 33; and grandchildren Olivia, 9, Viola, 7, Lillie M., 5, Georgiana, 4, and Mittie, 2; plus adopted grandson Frank McNeal, 16.

Olivia Barnes died 28 October 1918 in Cross Roads township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born in 1899 in Wayne County, N.C., to Frank Taylor and Hattie Sutton; was married to Rossie Barnes; and was buried in Pate graveyard.

In the 1920 census of Selma township, Johnston County, N.C.: farmer Icm J. Joyner, 52; wife Hattie, 40; and children Viola D., 17, Lillie M., 15, George A., 14, Mittie L., 12, Lizzie, 7, Annie, 3, Zalista, 2, and James I., 5 months.

In the 1930 census of Beulah township, Johnston County: farmer James I. Joyner, 59; wife Hattie, 50; and children Lillie, 24, Lizzie, 18, Annie, 12, and James I., Jr., 10.

In the 1940 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farm laborer Isom Joyner, 67; wife Hattie, 61; daughter Annie, 23; son James, 20; daughter-in-law Victoria, 20; and granddaughter Lenis Atkinson, 5.

Isom Joyner died 3 June 1943 in Spring Hill township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 28 July 1875 in Wilson County to Mary Barnes; was married to Hattie Joyner; was a farmer; and was buried in Polly Watson.

Hattie Joyner died 4 August 1957 in Spring Hill township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 26 January 1878 in Wilson County to Calvin Sutton and Sylvania Simmons; was the widow of Isom Joyner; was a retired farmer; and was buried in Polly Watson cemetery. Annie Edwards was informant.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user Regan Crump.

Studio shots, no. 199: Frank Taylor.

Frank Taylor (ca. 1880-??).

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On 20 December 1899, Frank Taylor, 21, of Wayne County, son of Alfred and Pleasant Taylor, married Hattie Sutton, 22, daughter of Calvin and Sylvania Sutton, at Calvin Sutton‘s house in Spring Hill township, Wilson County. Rev. W.H. Horton performed the ceremony in the presence of R.R. Braswell, A.B. Braswell, and L.H. Horton. [Note: Per family information, Frank Taylor’s biological father was not Alfred Taylor, but a white man.]

In the 1900 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Frank Taylor, 19;  wife Hattie, 23; and nephew Alfred, 7.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user Regan Crump.

Studio shot, no. 197: the Henderson-Taylor family.

This is not, strictly speaking, a studio shot, but it was taken by a studio photographer, Ray J. Dancy. Dancy made a house call to photograph Roderick Taylor Sr., Hattie Henderson, and their children in the front room of the Hendersons’ home at 1109 Queen Street, ca. 1944.

604 North Carroll Street.

The one hundred-fifty-fifth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1913; one story; L-plan cottage with turned-post porch.” [Note: per tax records, the house was built in 1925. It does not appear on the 1922 Sanborn fire insurance map.] The 1950 Wilson city directory reveals the original house number was 516.

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Graham David (c; Golda) h 516 N Carroll; also Graham Theola (c) 516 N Carroll

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Taylor Green (c) h 516 N Carroll; also, Taylor Green jr (c) h 516 N Carroll

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 516 Carroll Street, high school janitor Green Taylor, 57; wife Rebecca, 54; stepdaughters Lillie, 26, Wauline, 18, and Julia, 11; and son Robert Taylor, 19.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Edwards Julia (c) cook Rosa R Lupe h 516 N Carroll

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Edwards Julia (c) gro h 516 N Carroll h do [home ditto]

Wilson Daily Times, 8 July 1976.

Julia Edwards died 3 December 1989 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 14 February 1904 in Wilson County to John Henry Edwards Sr. and Nealie Farmer; was never married; had a fifth grade education; and operated a restaurant. Informant was Annie Edwards, Stantonsburg.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, April 2022.

The obituary of Green Taylor, Sr., school janitor.

Wilson Daily Times, April 1942.

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In the 1910 census of Bull Head township, Greene County: farmer Greene Taylor, 28; wife Annie, 24; children Clara, 4, and Greene, 1; and cousin Lonnie Malons, 8.

On 25 February 1914, Green Taylor, 34, of Greene County, married Sula Swinson, 20, of Greene County, daughter of Willis and Matilda Swinson, in Bullhead, Greene County.

In the 1920 census of Snow Hill township, Greene County: farmer Green Taylor, 39; wife Sula, 30; and children Clara, 14, Green, 12, and Essie Lee, 4.

On 4 January 1930, Green Taylor, 49, of Wilson, son of Green and Viney Taylor, married Rebecca Ruffin, 44, of Greene County, daughter of George and Lucy Batts, in Wilson County. Free Will minister A. Bynum performed the ceremony in Wilson County.

In the 1930 census of Bull Head township, Greene County, N.C.: on Bullhead Wilson Road, farmer Green Taylor, 49; wife Rebecca, 45; sons Elijah, 10, and Alfred R., 9; and stepchildren Charlie, 19, farm laborer, Lillie, 10, Wauline, 7, and Julia Mercer Ruffins, 1.

On 20 September 1932, Green Taylor [Jr.], 24, of Wilson, son of Green Taylor, married Bessie Leon Artis, 21, of Wilson, daughter of Noah and Patience Artis, who were Wayne County residents. Baptist minister B.F. Jordan performed the ceremony in the presence of Marion B. Jordan, Odess Jordan, and William Jordan. [Bessie Artis Taylor was a sister of Pauline Artis Harris.]

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 516 Carroll Street, high school janitor Green Taylor, 57; wife Rebecca, 54; stepdaughters Lillie, 26, Wauline, 18, and Julia, 11; and son Robert Taylor, 19.

Green Taylor died 2 April 1942 at Mercy Hospital. Per his registration card, he was 57 years old; was born in Greene County to Green Shackleford and Mary Taylor; was married to Rebecca Taylor; lived at 915 East Vance; worked as a common laborer; and was buried at Bethel cemetery.

Green Taylor Jr. died 27 September 1967 at his home at 1201 Atlantic Street, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 May 1907 in Greene County to Green Taylor and Sulla Swinson; was a retired laborer; served in World War II; and was a widower. Elijah Taylor, Washington, D.C., was informant.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Please let them go to church.

In February 1918, the Colored Ministerial Union published an appeal to white Wilsonians to adjust the working hours of their “colored help” to allow them to attend daytime Sunday services. 

Wilson Daily Times, 4 February 1918.

202 North East Street.

The one hundred-forty-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; double shotgun with gable-end form and engaged porch.”

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bullock Richd (c; Eva) gdnr h 202 N East. Also: Bullock Richd jr (c) h 202 N East

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 202 East Street, rented at $13/month, gardener Richard Bullock, 48; wife Eva, 25, cook; and [his] children Richard, 20, Moses, 16, George, 14, and Hellen Bullock, 13.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Ward Addie (c) cook h 202 N East. Also, Ward Elmer (c; 1) 202 N East.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Monroe Eug (c; Annie M) tob wkr h 202 N East.

Eugene Monroe died 1 January 1953 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 10 March 1900 in Sumpter, South Carolina, to Ida White; was a tobacco factory worker; was married; and lived at 202 North East Street. Annie Mae Monroe was informant.

Annie Mae Monroe died 1 March 1960 at her home at 202 North East Street. Per her death certificate, she was born 5 September 1912 in Wilson County to Joseph Z. Taylor and Martha Ellis; was a widow; worked as a presser for Service Laundry; and lived at 202 North East Street. Mrs. Ossie Mae Barnes, 202 North East Street, was informant.

In early 1967, R.E. Townsend & Company Real Estate applied for a permit to renovate 202 North East Street. Property managers and sellers since 1898, Townsend once controlled scores of rental properties in East Wilson. Wilson Daily Times, 2 June 1967.

Ossie Taylor Barnes died 12 February 1970 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 4 July 1908 in Wilson County to Joseph Taylor and Martha [maiden name unknown]; resided at Dew’s Rest Home, with permanent address at 202 North East Street; and was a widow. Mrs. Ida Edmundson, 711 Suggs Street, was informant.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, January 2022.

Lane Street Project: an anniversary and a promise.

Today marks the one-year anniversary of my discovery in Odd Fellows cemetery of my great-grandmother Rachel Barnes Taylor‘s grave marker. I am again in Wilson unexpectedly, but that meant I was able to stop by to lend encouragement to the Senior Force and to meet two young men who stopped by out of curiosity.

Castonoble Hooks filled them in on the Lane Street Project and encouraged them to bring their friends to the next scheduled clean-up on February 12. I reeled off a few names of families buried in Odd Fellows. When I said “Artis,” the young man in the Rugrats sweatshirt looked up quickly. “I’m an Artis,” he said. I asked if he wanted to see the Artis headstones we’ve discovered, and he turned to his friend: “Cut the car off.”

I led the two back to the pile in which I found Rachel Taylor’s headstone, as well as those of Amelia Artis and her son Rufus Artis, who died in 1916 at age 16. Both agreed that more in the community should know about Lane Street Project’s work and promised to return next month.