National Register of Historic Places

138 Ashe Street.

The one hundred-forty-fifth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; shotgun with shed-roofed porch.”

The house shown at 138 Ashe Street in the 1922 Sanborn map of Wilson is clearly not the house above. That house, which belonged to the Levi and Hannah H. Peacock family and was later numbered 218, was a multi-roomed bungalow with an auto shed in the rear. It was located much closer to Darden Allen (now Darden Lane) than the present 138.

It appears that, circa 1929, several in-fill endway houses were constructed mid-block on Ashe Street, necessitating the renumbering of houses lying northeast toward Darden Alley. At that point, the Peacocks’ 138 became 218. However, in the 1941 and 1950 city directory, house numbers on Ashe Street skip from 126 to 200. The crucial clue for the house featured above is found in the 1957 city directory, in houses 200- 224 are renumbered as 126-150. Thus, we see that 138 Ashe had been 210 Ashe.

Excerpt from Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory (1957). 

136 and 138 Ashe were constructed as mirror-image twins. (The side steps of 136 are just visible in the photo.) 138 was later modified with a rear addition.

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Simpson Robert (c; Hattie) lab 210 Ashe [As a measure of the tenant turnover in Ashe Street endway houses, note that, when Hattie Simpson died in 1929, the family lived at 127, and when Robert Simpson died in 1934, they lived at 116.]

Rosa Mae Allen died 25 June 1937 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 14 years old; was a student; lived at 210 Ashe; and was born in Wilson County to Wade Allen and Fannie Barnes.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: tobacco factory laborer Wade Allen, 37; wife Fannie, 35, tobacco factory stemmer; son John H., 16; Oddesa [illegible], 18, washer; and Mary E. Smith, 16, nurse.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Allen Wade (c; Fannie) farmer h 210 Ashe

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Allen Wade (c; Fannie) lab City Street Dept h 210 Ashe

Photo courtesy of Briggs Sherwood.

300 North Reid Street.

The one hundred-forty-fourth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 1/2 stories; Jesse Knight house; popular bungalow design with gable roof and engaged porch; shed dormer; Knight was a porter at the Cherry Hotel in Wilson.”

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hines Ashley (c; Margaret) driver h 300 N Reid

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hines Ashley (c; Margaret) truck driver h 300 N Reid

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 300 Reid, rented for $20/month, Ash Hines, 36, tobacco factory laborer; wife Margrette, 37, public school teacher; and son Albert, 11.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 300 Reid, owned and valued at $2000, Jessie Knight, 38, cook, and wife Lessie, 42, maid. 

In 1942, Jesse Knight registered for the World War II draft. Per his registration card, he was born 15 March 1902 in Edgecombe County, N.C.; lived at 300 North Reid Street; his contact was Rodda McMillan, 103 South Vick Street; and he worked for J.T. Barnes.

Wilson Daily Times, 13 December 1946.

Jesse Knight died 28 January 1952 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 52 years old; was born in Edgecombe County to John Knight and Sallie Batts; lived at 300 North Reid; worked as a laborer; and was married to Lessie Knight.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2021.

1112 Queen Street.

The one hundred-forty-third in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; shotgun with bungalow type porch posts.”

——

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1112 Queen, Luther McKethian, 27; wife Elizabeth, 23; and son Luther, 2.

In 1940, Luther Elworth McKeithan registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 30 December 1911 in Cumberland County, N.C.; lived at 1112 Queen Street, Wilson; his contact was wife Elizabeth McKeithan; and he worked for F.A. Doren, Woolworth’s Nash Street, Wilson.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C. city directory: McKeithan Luther (c; Eliz B) porter F W Woolworth Co h 1112 Queen

On 24 October 1944, Wade Moore paid for an ad in the Daily Times seeking the return of several ration books to him at home or at Rex Shoe Shop, his place of employment.

Endway houses like 1112 Queen were built as rental property, and tenants turned over frequently. Here, the owner or agent listed the house for sale with two adjoining endway houses and several other East Wilson properties:

Wilson Daily Times, 6 September 1946.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Wood Howell (c) emp City h 1112 Queen

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2021.

716 East Green Street.

The one hundred-forty-second in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1913; 1 story; shotgun with flush eaves and chamfered porch posts.” 

——

The 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory lists laborer Edward D. Gause and wife Rosa, students Lorine and Maude Gause, and laborer Maxie Gause at 716 East Green.

Ed. Gause died 19 July 1929 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, he was 54 years old; was born in Nichols, S.C., to Solomon Gause and Annie Gause; worked as a common laborer; lived at 716 East Green; and was married to Rosa Gause. Inez Williams was informant, and Gause was buried in Rountree’s cemetery.

The 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory lists factory hands Lorine and Maude Gause, laborers Maxwell and Winston Gause, and laundress Rosa Gause at 716 East Green.

Lorene Gause died 6 January 1933 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was single, was 21 years old, worked as a domestic, and was born in Mullens, S.C., to Ed Gause and Rosa McDaniel. Rosa Gause, 716 East Green, was informant.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 716 East Green, rented for $14/month, Joseph Sutton, 61; wife Malissa, 60; children Beatrice, 26, James, 25, Fred, 23, Bruce, 19, Beulah, 17, and Mable, 16; and grandchildren Ivan, 8, and Geraldine, 7.  

Fred Douglass Sutton registered for the World War II draft in 1940 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 18 September 1918 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 716 East Green Street, Wilson; worked for Southern Tadoco [Tobacco] Company, Wilson; and his contact was mother Millisa Gray Sutton, 716 East Green.

James Wesley Sutton registered for the World War II draft in 1940 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 18 August 1914 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 716 East Green Street, Wilson; worked for Southern Tobacco Company, Wilson; and his contact was mother Mallissie Grey Sutton, 716 East Green.

Joseph Levi Sutton registered for the World War II draft in 1940 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 9 May 1919 in Wilson County, N.C.; lived at 534 East Nash Street, Wilson; worked for Southern Tobacco Company, Wilson; and his contact was mother Malissie Grey Sutton, 716 East Green.

Thomas Rogers registered for the World War II draft in 1940 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1900 in Nash County, N.C.; lived at 713 East Vance Street, Wilson; worked for R.F. Beland at Plummer Shop, 119 South Goldsboro Street, Wilson; and his contact was Mrs. Mallissa Sutton, 716 East Green.

The 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory lists laborer Fred Sutton, maid Beatrice Sutton, CCC worker Bruce Sutton, tobacco worker James W. Sutton, laborer Levi Sutton and wife Josie, and Melissa G. Sutton at 716 East Green.

The 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory lists student Bruce Sutton, housekeeper Melissa G. Sutton, and domestic Rosa Sutton at 716 East Green.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, November 2021.

406 East Green Street.

The one hundred-fortieth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1893; 1 story; two-room house; among oldest in district; intact porch with chamfered posts.”

——

As shown in the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, the first few houses of the 400 block of East Green comprised a rare integrated block. Houses (and a grocery) numbered 402, 404, 406, 408 1/2, and 410 had white occupants. Numbers 405, 408, 411, and the remainder of the block headed east had black occupants. (400 and 407 were vacant; there was no 401 or 403.) 406 was occupied by William H. and Cora Brown.

By the 1930 Hill’s city directory, laborer Ephraim Brown and his wife Cora lived at 406. His white neighbors were Baker Brothers grocery, William J. and Mandy Pittman, Sallie A. Ezzell (who owned three adjoining houses mid-block), and James and Martha Farmer. 

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 406 East Green, Evelyne Giles, 30, stemmer, divorced; daughter Thelma, 14; mother Aline Hawkins, 42, stemmer, and her son Lee Hawkins, 22, odd jobs laborer. 

John Lee Hawkins registered for the World War II draft in Wilson in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 6 July 1916 in Black Creek, N.C.; lived at 406 East Green; his contact was mother Aileen Hawkins; and he worked for Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company, South Goldsboro Street.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Giles Evelyn (c) tob wkr h 406 E Green

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Giles Evelyn (c) fctywkr h 406 E Green

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, November 2021.

1200 East Hines Street.

The one hundred thirty-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; bungalow with engaged gable-roofed [sic; it is shed-roofed] porch and heavy square porch posts on brick piers; asbestos veneer.”

The address of this house was 1200 Wainwright Avenue prior to the extension of Hines Street in the early 1970s.

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Haskins Damp (c; Sudie B) driver 1200 Wainwright av; Haskins Estelle (c) dom 1200 Wainwright; Haskins Hester (c) h 1200 Wainwright

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Haskins Hester (c) h 1200 Wainwright

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1200 Wainwright, valued at $1700, Coca-Cola Plant laborer Damp Haskins, 24; wife Sudie B., 21; children Damp Jr., 2, and Hellen, 6 months; mother Hester, 72; brother Joseph, 18; sister Martha Pitt, 52, servant; and nephew Jim R. Haskins, 10.

In 1940, Johnnie Hagans registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 26 June 1917 in Wilson; was unemployed; lived at 1200 Wainwright Street; and his contact was mother Mamie Hagans

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hagan Jas (c) lab 1200 S Wainwright av;  Hagan Mamie (c) farmer 1200 S Wainwright av; Hagan Sarah (c) tob wkr 1200 Wainwright av

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Price Louis (c; Nellie) farmer h 1200 S Wainwright av

Wilson Daily Times, 9 July 1948.

Louis Price died 23 August 1948 at his home at 1200 Wainwright Avenue, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 2 June 1903 in Harnett County, N.C., to Walter Price and Amy McNeil; and was buried in Smith Grove, Dunn, N.C.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 June 1962. 

[Personal sidenote: During my childhood, 1200 Wainwright was the home of William and Mable Tyson Foreman. My sister and I spent many happy hours playing with their three grandchildren, our “play cousins,” on their visits from Washington, D.C.]

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, November 2021. 

1010 Wainwright Avenue.

For reasons that are not clear to me, the 1000 block of Wainwright Avenue is not included in the  East Wilson Historic District, though this house and others on the block date to the 1920s and ’30s.  

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1010 Wainwright was vacant.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1010 Wainwright, rented for $15/month, Grover Jackson, 48, odd jobs laborer, born in Alabama; wife Hattie, 30, servant; stepdaughters Bertha Reese, 15, Sarah E. Reese, 12, and Billie Roberson, 9, and stepson Samuel Farmer, 9.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jackson Grover (c; Hattie) lab h 1010 Wainwright Av

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1010 Wainwright, owned and valued at $750, Calvin Swinson, 41; wife Alice, 35; and children Jessie, 15, Calvin, 12, Earlean, 11, Horace, 9, Soisetta, 6, and Charles, 2.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Swinson Calvin (c; Alice; 6) orderly h 1010 Wainwright Av

In 1942, Calvin Swinson registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 6 June 1898 in Greene County, N.C.; lived at 1010 Wainwright; his contact was [father-in-law] Wesley Jones, 901 Stantonsburg Street, Wilson; and he worked for Woodard-Herring Hospital.

In 1945, Calvin Swinson Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 11 June 1927 in Wilson; lived at 1010 Wainwright; his contact was Calvin Swinson; and he was a student at Darden High School.

Wilson Daily Times, 15 September 1948.

Wilson Daily Times, 9 August 1950.

309 North Pender Street.

The one hundred thirty-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

In the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this address is described as a vacant lot. It is currently a garden area for the inhabitants of 311 North Pender.

Per Robert C. Bainbridge and Kate Ohno in Wilson, North Carolina: Historic Buildings Survey (1980), source of the photo above: “This cottage dates between 1880 and 1900. Built in an L-plan, the front cross gable boasts double arched windows. The shed roof porch is supported by turned columns.”

——

309 North Pender as drawn in the 1922 Sanborn fire insurance map. The narrow street running alongside the house (just visible in the photo above) was once known as “Short Viola” Street. It is now an alley.

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Smith Mattie (c) lndrs h 309 Pender

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bell Chas (c; Nina) lab h 309 Pender

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 309 Pender, rented for $16/month, Charlie Bell, 48, truck driver; wife Nina, 21; sons Dillon, 4, and Benson, 1; and lodger Rosa Lee White, 22.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 309 Pender, rented for $12/month, Alice Artis, 56; daughter Pauline Henderson, 39; and children Bessie L., 23, Alice, 20, Joyce, 18, Mildred, 16, Doris, 10, and Robert, 4.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Cooper Wm (c; Nellie, 2) lab h 309 Pender

Nellie McLeod Cooper died 2 February 1947 in Wilson, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 46 years old; was born in Robeson County, N.C.; lived at 309 North Pender; was married to Willie Cooper; and worked as common laborer at a tobacco factory.

905 Robeson Street.

The one hundred thirty-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1922; 1 story; locally rare double-pile, hip-roofed duplex with center roof gable.”

Per Robert C. Bainbridge and Kate Ohno in Wilson, North Carolina: Historic Buildings Survey (1980), which includes the photo above: “Representative of many houses built in Wilson at the turn of the century, this house has a large central shingled cross gable on each elevation. The house has been altered to convert it into a duplex.”

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Oliver Jesse (c; Mary) driver Wilson Marble & G Co h 905 Robeson

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: McLean Eliza (c) dom h 905 Robeson

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: John Artis, 28, public service laborer, and son Willie, 15; also, John Jones, 39, public service laborer, and wife Viola, 31, housekeeper in private home.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones John H (c; Viola) tob wkr h 905 Robeson

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Pepper Wm (c; Mary) soft drinks 902 Wiggins h 905 Robeson; also Allen James (c; Cora) lab h 905 Robeson

718 East Green Street.

The one hundred thirty-sixth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

718 East Green Street, formerly numbered 649, is now an empty lot. Any buildings on the lot were demolished prior to the survey of the East Wilson Historic District. In the early 20th century, however, it was the site of a small Black-owned grocery, one of the earliest in East Wilson. City directories reveal the store’s existence, under an ever-changing series of proprietors, as early as 1908 and as late as the 1940s.

John H. Miller and John H. Lewis are the earliest identified grocers at the location in 1908.

Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1908.

Four years later, the city directory shows Jacob C. Speight as the owner. He lived two houses down Green Street.

Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1912.

Detail of page, Sanborn fire insurance map of Wilson, N.C., 1913.

By 1916, Selly Rogers was the operator of this grocery, as well as another on Stantonsburg Road (now Pender Street South).

Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1916.

By 1922, several houses had been built around the store, and its number had changed from 649 to 718.

Detail of page, Sanborn fire insurance map of Wilson, N.C., 1922.

Grant J. Foster is listed as the owner in 1925, but within a few years he was operating a grocery on Viola Street.

Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1925.

The ownership of the grocery during the 1930s is not yet known. By 1941, Green Street Grocery and Market had a white owner, however, John M. Coley.

Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1941.

Sometime during or after World War II, the building at 718 ceased use as a grocery and became a residence, perhaps as a result of intense post-war housing shortages. By 1947, it was the home of photographer John H. Baker and his wife Rosalee.

Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1947.