National Register of Historic Places

101 South Pender Street.

The one hundred eighty-fourth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

The corner today, per Google Maps.

The corner of Pender and Nash, at 101 South Pender Street [Stantonsburg Street] (also known as 600 East Nash Street), as described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1950; 1 story; porcelain-enameled steel gas station with clean lines and simple square form suggesting International Style; altered and in disrepair.”

The 1908 Sanborn fire insurance maps of Wilson, N.C., depict an irregularly shaped vacant brick building at the tip of the triangle formed by the intersection of East Nash Street and Stantonsburg Street (now South Pender Street). It was numbered 601-603 East Nash Street. The building shown just below it was the original location of Darden Funeral Home. The three-story building also housed C.H. Darden’s bicycle shop and general repair business. The third floor was reserved for lodge meetings. (Which lodge? The Odd Fellows and Masons had their own lodges.)

The 1913 Sanborn map shows the building modified with a wooden porch on the Stantonsburg Street side and cast-iron porches at the entrance and Nash Street side. A grocery occupied the space.

By time the 1922 Sanborn map was drawn, the street numbers had flipped from odd to even and vice-versa, and the auto repair shop at the corner was at 600 East Nash Street.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Triangle Service Station (Wm H Taylor) 600 E Nash

In the 1941 and 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directories: Triangle Service Station (Cleveland T Barnes) filling sta 101 Stantonsburg

The Oblong Box-Style gas station described in the nomination form may date to 1950, but petroleum corporations began adopting the style in the late 1930s. I have not found photos of Triangle Service Station to determine whether it was built in the style or upgraded to it.

In the 1963 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Sutton’s Gulf Service (Cecil E Sutton) 600 E Nash St

The  Gulf gas station is just visible in this detail from a mid to late 1960s photo of the area.

The building is currently home to a carwash business.

801 East Green Street.

The one hundred eighty-third in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1913; 1 story; aluminum-sided and remodeled L-plan cottage.”

——

The house appears as an unnumbered dwelling on the 1913 Sanborn fire insurance maps of Wilson, N.C. This detail from page 32 of the 1922 Sanborn maps of Wilson, shows the house numbered 801 East Green Street. (As detailed below, for many years owners of this house operated a small grocery around the corner and behind the house, on North Vick. That store was built between 1922 and 1928.)

In the 1928 and 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directories: Faison Grant J (c; Charlotte) gro 502 N Vick h 801 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 801 East Green, Grant Faisson, 46, grocery store merchant, and wife Charlotte, 42, trained hospital nurse. 

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 801 East Green, Grant J. Faison, 58, retail grocery operator, and wife Charlotte, 52, saleswoman in grocery store.

Wilson Daily Times, 28 December 1940.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Faison Grant J (c; Charlotte M) gro 502 N Vick h 801 E Green

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Foster Carter (c; Estelle W) gro 502 N Vick and County Farm Demonstration agent h 801 E Green

In the 1950 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 801 East Green, county farm agent Carter W. Foster, 36; wife Estelle, 34; daughter Bobbie J., 7; and nephew Dannie Jones, 8, born in Pennsylvania.

Carter Washington Foster died 17 February 1955 in Saratoga township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 15 January 1914 in Wilson to Walter Foster and Rosa Parker; was married; resided at 801 East Green; and worked as a county agricultural agent.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, November 2022.

929 Carolina Street.

The one hundred eighty-first in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1940; 1 story; shotgun with bungalow type porch posts.”

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bullock Joseph (c; Sadie) lab h 929 Carolina

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, the house was vacant.

Wilson Daily Times, 29 October 1940.

This issue of the Wilson Daily Times reported that the draft numbers of James Woodard of 929 Carolina Street and Lewis Townsend of 506 Banks Street.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Woodard James (c; Annie; 1) delmn h 929 Carolina

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Handley [Handy] Jessie (c; Levan) brklyr h 929 Carolina

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, September 2022.

1200 Washington Street.

The one hundred eightieth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1922; 1 story; hip-roofed, two-bay cottage with side hall.”

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Pitt Leaston (c; Maggie) cooper h 1200 Washington

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: McNeil Jesse (c; Cornelia) h 1200 Washington

In the 1950 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1200 Washington Street, “plaster helper” John L. Hart, 49; wife Eloise, 20; and lodger Ross Barnes, 41; his wife Emma, 32; and their daughter Bettie, 1.

Ben Hart died 7 November 1951 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 20 March 1881 in Edgecombe County to Wiley Hart; was a widower; resided at 1200 Washington Street, Wilson. Informant was Rev. J.L. Hart, 1200 Washington Street.

John L. Hart died 6 February 1963 at Mercy Hospital. Per his death certificate, he was born 28 January 1901 in Wilson County to Benjamin Hart and Temie Ann Jones; was a minister; lived at 1200 Washington Street; and was married to Elouise Hart.

1008 Washington Street.

The one hundred-seventy-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; Clarence McCullers house; bungalow with low hipped roof and double-pile plan; McCullers was a chauffeur.”

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1008 Washington Street, Clarence McCullers, 42, hardware store laborer; wife Rosa E., 37, who did washing; and son Willie E., 17.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1008 Washington Street, Clarence McCullers, 45, born Johnston County, light plant employee; wife Rosa, 43, born Wilson County, a laundress; and roomer Ethel Alexander, 28, born Scotland Neck, North Carolina, a teacher at Darden High.

Rosa E. McCullers died 18 January 1944 at Mercy Hospital. Per her death certificate, she resided at 1008 Washington Street; was 50 years old; was born in Wilson to John Hardy and Lucinda Rountree; and was buried in Rountree cemetery. Clarence McCullers was informant.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: McCullers Clarence (c) lab h 1008 Washington

In the 1950 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1008 Washington, Leonard Moore, 33, A.C.L. Railway porter, and wife Mary A., 30, clerk at local drug store.

On 18 July 1953, Ozzie Moore, 26, of 1113 Atlantic Street, son of Johnnie Moore and Araminice Cohen [Armencie Cone] Moore, married Bessie Howard, 22, of 412 East Walnut Street, daughter of Monk Johnson and Clara Howard, in Wilson. Rev. E.F. Johnson, a Disciples of Christ minister, performed the ceremony in the presence of Leonard Moore, 1008 Washington Street; Annie D. Jones, 414 East Walnut Street; and Noel B. Jones, 411 Banks Street.

Emiline Edwards Woodard died 15 April 1971 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 20 December 1894 to a mother named Hagar and an unknown father and was a widow. Informant was Mrs. Mary W. Moore, 1008 Washington Street.

Photos by Lisa Y. Henderson, September 2022.

1115 Carolina Street.

The one hundred-seventy-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1940; 1-story; bungalow with gable roof form and shingle shake veneer.”

Timothy and Grace Battle Black purchased the property at 1115 Carolina Street in 1935 and likely built this house within the next few years.

In 1939, they appeared in a list of property owners who faced sale of their properties for unpaid taxes:

Wilson Daily Times, 21 November 1939.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Black Grace (c) cook h 1115 Carolina

The Blacks divorced in mid-1944, and in July the Wilson Daily Times published a series of notices of the sale of 1115 Carolina.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 July 1944.

The sale was apparently called off, as Grace Black remained in the house three years later. In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Black Grace (c) cook McLellans h 1115 Carolina.

710, 712, and 714 Viola Street.

The one hundred-seventy-fifth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

710 Viola Street.

714 Viola Street.

Three houses are under simultaneous renovation in the 700 block of Viola Street. They have been filleted wide open, offering a close look at the construction methods for inexpensive rental housing in the early 20th century.

Lathing covering the interior wall of the right-hand side of the duplex at 714. Though many houses in this era had beadboard walls, the laths suggest these were plaster. Brick pillars support the sill that ran down the duplex’s centerline. 

The beadboard ceiling.

The right-hand side of 712 Viola Street with exposed floor joists in the front half of the house. The brick box at center supported a central chimney through which an oil or wood-burning stove vented.

The single endway house at 714 Viola has completely new sills and joists. 

  • 710 Viola Street

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; gable-end double shotgun with shed-roofed porch.”

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Pender Henry (c; Mollie) farm hd h 710 Viola

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 710 Viola, paying $12/month, grocery store delivery man Earnest McCray, 22; wife Lizzie, 19; and son Levaughn, 3; plus roomers Mollie Pender, 48, servant, and Henry Pender, 45, farm laborer.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 710 Viola, rented for $9/month, Mamie Lassiter, 51, widow, household servant, and sons John D., 33, highway project laborer, and Samuel, 27, tobacco factory laborer; also, for $9/month, William H. Pender, 59, carpenter helper; wife Mollie, 52, tobacco factory stemmer; and lodgers Eva Reid, 25, and Mary J. Pitt, 27, public school teachers.

In 1940, Charles Bryant Lassiter registered for the World War II draft in Richmond, Virginia. Per his registration card, he was born 8 November 1917 in Smithfield, N.C.; his contact was mother Mamie Lassiter, 710 Viola Street, Wilson; and he worked for R.G. Booker at Hotel John Marshall, 5th and Franklin, Richmond.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Pender W Henry (c; Mollie) carp h 710 Viola. Also: Pender Sudie (c) tob wkr h 710 Viola

In 1942, John Daniel Lassiter registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 26 October 1902 in Johnston County, N.C.; lived at 710 Viola; his contact was Mamie Lassiter; and he worked for Wilson Floral Company, 307 Hill Street, Wilson.

Charles B. Lassiter died 8 March 1946 at the Veterans Administration hospital in Kecoughtan, Virginia. Per his death certificate, he was born 8 November 1917 in North Carolina to John D. Lassiter of Johnston County and Mamie Sanders of Harnett County; his regular address was 710 East Viola Street, Wilson; he was single; he was a World War II veteran; and he worked as an insurance agent.

Wilson Daily Times, 15 March 1946.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Pender Mollie Mrs (c; wid W Henry) tob wkr h 710 Viola. Also: Lassiter John D (c; Lillie) hlpr Wilson Floral Co h 710 Viola

  • 712 Viola Street

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; gable-end double shotgun; identical to #710.”

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: at 712 Viola, rented for $12/month, Marrion Mercer, 32, tobacco factory laborer; wife Sarah, 28; brother Leslie Mercer, 50, tobacco factory laborer; and children Isear, 10, Marjorie, 8, and Florence Mercer, 5.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 712 Viola, rented for $9/month, John Johnson, 29, cotton oil mill laborer; wife Nellie, 25, tobacco factory hanger; daughters Gertie B., 8, and Daisey Lee, 4; sister-in-law Lula M. Hunter, 23, and niece-in-law Bernice, 3. Also, renting for $9, Frank Harris, 45; wife Mamie, 40; and children Frank Jr., 12, Mildred, 9, Raymond, 7, James L., 4, and Mary L., 1.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Johnson John (c; Nellie; 2) hlpr Colonial Ice Co h 712 Viola. Also: Harris Frank (c; Nannie) lab Stephenson Lbr Co h 712 1/2 Viola

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Vines Jack (c; Hazel M) tob wkr h 712 Viola. Also: Harris Benj F (c; Mamie) lab Williams Lbr h 712 1/2 Viola

  • 714 Viola Street

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1922; 1 story; shotgun; shed-roofed porch.”

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: at 714 Viola, tobacco factory laborer Annie Gunn, 56; daughter Mattie, 18; father Charles Barnes, 80; niece Annie Barnes, 26, cook; and roomer Hellen Brewer, 17, servant.

Charles Barnes died 18 June 1930 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 77 years old; lived on East Viola Street; was born in Wilson County in Alex Barnes. John M. Barnes was informant.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 714 Viola, rented for $9/month, Madison Mincey, 25, hospital orderly; wife Lallo R., 22; and children Elizabeth E. and Robert E., 3, Johnnie M., 1, and Luther, 5 months.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Mincey Madison (c; Lottie; 4) orderly h 714 Viola

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jorda Wm J (c; Rosa) agrl wkr h 714 Viola

Photographs by Lisa Y. Henderson, June 2022.

613 Viola Street.

The one hundred-seventy-fourth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1913; 1 story; cross-gable house; aluminum sided and modernized.”

—— 

In the 1928 and 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directories: Stone Mary (c) cook h 613 Viola

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: rented for $12/month, widow Mary Stone, 50, cook.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 613 Viola, rented for $8/month, widow Lizzie Jones, 77; daughter Jesse Lee, 54; daughter, Lela, 24, household servant; and grandson Floyd L. Stancil, 14.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directories: Nelson Albert (c; Bessie; 3) hlpr City Light Water & Gas Dept h 613 Viola

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directories: Wise Lillie (c) dom h 613 Viola

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, June 2020.

1204 Carolina Street.

The one hundred-seventy-third in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; shotgun with engaged porch.”

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Coleman James W (c; Annie) cook h 1204 Carolina St. The house was described as vacant in the 1930 city directory.

James Walter Coleman died 1 April 1930 in Wilson of an “unavoidable auto accident.” Per his death certificate, he was born 7 January 1900 in Nash County, North Carolina, to John Coleman; was married to Johnnie Ann Coleman; worked as a waiter at the Imperial Hotel; and lived at 1204 Carolina Street.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1204 Carolina Street, Oscar Ratcliff, 26, mortar mixer for Wilkins & Wilkins, and wife Nellie, 30, tobacco factory stemmer.

In the 1941 and 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directories: Ratcliff Oscar (c; Nellie) lab h 1204 Carolina

In the 1950 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1204 Carolina Street, Oscar Ratcliff, 49, plumbing and heating laborer, and wife Nellie, 43, worked in diet kitchen at tuberculosis sanitorium.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, June 2022.