Ellis

Studio shots, no. 99: Harry and Luetta Brooks Ellis.

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Harry and Luetta Brooks Ellis.

In the 1900 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Daniel Ellis, 40; wife Celia, 24; and children Lena, 10, William, 7, Mary E., 6, Sampson, 2, and Harry, 10 months.

In the 1910 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg Road, farmer Daniel Ellis, 50; wife Celia, 35; and children Maeliza, 13, Willie, 14, Samson, 11, Harry, 10, Robert, 7, and Jackson, 8.

On 18 May 1921, Harry Ellis, son of Daniel Ellis and Celia Ellis, married Luretta Brooks, daughter of Coy Brooks and Maggie Woodard, in Stantonsburg. Rev. E.H. Cox of the U.A.F.W. Baptist Church performed the ceremony in the presence of Henry Dillard of Wilson and John Artis and Pearl Donald of Stantonsburg.

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Ellis Harry (c; Louetta) mill hand h 631 Lincoln

Nathaniel Ellis died 1 July 1929 of bronchopneumonia at his home at 801 Everlyn[?], Wilson. He was a year and eight months old; was born in Wilson to Harry Ellis of Stantonsburg and Louetta Brooks of Wilson County; and was born in Rountree cemetery.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Harry Ellis, 28, farm laborer; wife Luetta, 24; and children Lenora, 6, Harry, 4, and Ruth, 3 months.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Harry Ellis, 38, farmer; wife Luetta, 34; children Lenora, 15, Harry L., 13, Ruth L., 11; stepmother Maggie Ellis, 55, widow; and sister Mattie Ellis, 15.

In 1944, Harry Lee Ellis registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 15 January 1926 in Wilson County; his contact was Harry Ellis; he lived at Route 3, Box 269, Wilson; and he worked as a helper on the farm of W.A. Batts.

Louetta Ellis died 14 August 1983, and Harry Ellis died 28 December 1988, both in Wilson.

Harry Ellis, probably in the mid-1980s. (Sidenote: I love everything about this photo.)

Photos courtesy of Ancestry user Nortonsapple.

The obituaries of Fannie G. Ellis and John Henry Moore.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 December 1949.

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In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Wiggins Mill Road, farmer Bryant Ellis, 40; wife Mary Jane, 39; and children Pinkey, 17, General, 15, Gusten, 13, Bryant, 11, Thomas, 9, Sonnie, 7, Ronnie, 5, Sylvester, 3, and Mary Jane, 10 months.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Bryant Ellis, 53; wife Mary, 50; and children Daisy Sarah Herring, 28, and Gustus, 24, Bryant Jr., 21, Thomas, 19, Sonie, 17, Visor 12,  Mary, 11, William, 9, and Minnie Ellis, 5; and grandchildren Lizzie, 2, and Carry Gray, 1.

On 27 May 1937, Thomas E. Ellis, 35, of Winston-Salem, son of Bryant and Mary Jane Ellis of Wilson, married Fannie Gilmer, 27, of Winston-Salem, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

In the 1940 census of Winston-Salem, Forsyth County: Lafayette Cook, 24, teacher; wife Beatrice, 25; and son Lafayette Cook Jr., 1; with lodgers Thomas Ellis, 35, insurance agent, and wife Fannie, 30, tobacco factory stemmer.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Ellis Thos E (c; Fannie F) mgr Winston Mut Life Ins Co h 616 E Green

In 1942, Thomas Elder Ellis registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 25 February 1902 in Wilson; resided at 302 North Vick Street, Wilson; received mail at Post Office Box 93, Wilson; his contact was Short Barnes, 616 East Green Street; and he worked for Winston Mutual Life Insurance Company at its branch office in Wilson.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Ellis Thos E (c; Fannie G) mgr Winston Mut Life Ins Co h 1307 Atlantic Av

Fannie Goosby Ellis died 3 December 1949 at Wilson County Sanatorium. Per her death certificate, she was born 5 November 1907 in Davie County, North Carolina, to Horace Goosby and Mary Ann Lash; was married to Thomas Ellis; resided at 1307 East Atlantic Street; and was buried in Ellis Cemetery, Wilson County.

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In the 1912 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Moore Jno H shoemkr 526 E Nash h 137 Pender

In 1918, John Henry Moore registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 6 October 1884; resided on Atlantic Street, Wilson; was a self-employed shoe repairer with a shop at 513 East Nash; and his nearest relative was wife Armensie Moore.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Atlantic Street, James [sic] H. Moore, 36, laborer; wife Mary, 23; and children Robert, 6, Lenard, 3, and Carl, 1.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1113 Atlantic Street, owned and valued at $2000, shoe shop cobbler John H. Moore, 45; wife Annie, 31; and children Lena, 13, Carl, 11, John, 9, Anna G., 7, Odessia B., 3, and Ruth, 16 months.

In 1944, Ozzie Moore registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 1 September 1926 in Wilson; resided at 1113 Atlantic Street, Wilson; his contact was his father, J.H. Moore; and was employed by J.H. Moore at 517 East Nash Street, Wilson.

John Henry Moore died 4 December 1949 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 6 October 1894 in Pitt County, North Carolina, to Samuel Moore and Caroline Bullock; was married to Armecie Moore; resided at 1113 Atlantic Street; and operated a shoe shop.

John H. Moore’s headstone in Rest Haven cemetery. Both it and the family marker were engraved by Clarence B. Best.

The wind was terrific.

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Wilson Times, 14 July 1911.

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Perhaps, in the 1910 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Rheubin Ellis Jr., 34, wife Annie, 33, and children Ida, 13, and Albert, 12. Or, next door, Rheubin Ellis, 76; wife Clarkie, 72; daughters Henretta, 23, Joemima, 22, and Cherrie, 19; and grandchildren Amie, 14, Ashley, 12, Rheubin, 11, and Lucy, 11 months.

Littleton Ellis’ land division.

Littleton Ellis‘ land was surveyed, divided and platted in the spring of 1942, several decades years after his death between 1900 and 1910. The road slicing across the middle of the plat map appears to be today’s Forest Hills Road, with directions east “To U.S. Hwy. No. 301” and west “To Road Leading to the Wilson Via of Winstead Sch.”

Plat book 2, page 175, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson.

Littleton Ellis Jr.’s crop lien.

As adapted from Wikipedia and NCPedia: the crop-lien system was a credit system widely used by cotton and tobacco farmers in the South from the 1860s to the 1930s. Sharecroppers and tenant farmers, who did not own the land they worked, and even cash-strapped landowners, obtained supplies and food on credit from local merchants. The merchants held a lien on the farmer’s crop, and the merchants and landowners were the first ones paid from its sale. What was left over went to the farmer. Merchants routinely, and lawfully, marked up prices, and country stores rapidly proliferated across North Carolina and the South. Abuses in the crop lien system reduced many tenant farmers to a state of debt peonage, as their debts to landlords and merchants carried over from one year to the next.

On 1 January 1910, Littleton Ellis Jr. gave F.S. Davis a $140 lien on his crop in order to purchase fertilizer from Farmers Guano Company. Ellis promised to raise cotton and corn on the land on which he lived (and likely owned as his share of his father’s property) and also pledged a black mule, Rhodie, and a yellow mule, Katie, as security.

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In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Littleton Ellis, 73; wife Judy, 55; and children Lucy, 21, Littleton, 18, Sarah, 16, Maggie, 14, Nettie, 12, and Minnie, 10.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Wiggins Mill Road, farmer Littleton Ellis, 27; his mother Judie, 62; and sisters Lucy, 30, Sarah, 24, Maggie, 23, and Lettie, 21.

Littleton Ellis registered for the World War I draft in 1918. Per his draft registration card, he was born 30 August 1882; lived at Box 75, R.F.D. #2, Wilson; was a farmer “on his own land next to R.P. Watsons”; and his nearest relative was mother Juddy Ellis.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Judie Ellis, 80, widow; children Lucy, 32, Litt, 30, and Maggie, 25; and granddaughter Manerva Barnes, 22.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Littleton Ellis Jr., 47; widowed mother Juddie, 82; and divorced sister Lucy Cooker, 49.

Littleton Ellis died 24 March 1934 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 30 August 1882 in Wilson to Littleton Ellis and Judia Barnes; Bryant Ellis was informant.

Deed book 72, page 562, Register of Deeds Office, Wilson.

Obituary of Mamie Ellis.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 December 1949.

Per her death certificate, Mamie Ellis died 4 December 1949 at her home at 117 Ashe Street. She was born 31 January 1893 in Wilson to John Ellis and Mary Daniels; was a widower; and had worked as a laundress. She was buried in Rest Haven cemetery, and Lula Foster, 925 Washington Street, Wilson, was informant.

1113 East Nash Street.

The thirty-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for East Wilson Historic District: “1927; 2 stories. Parsonage, Jackson Chapel Baptist Church; cubic, hip-roofed, is blend of Colonial Revival and bungalow traits, typical of a host of middle-class dwellings in district built during 1920s.”

In the 1930 Wilson city directory: Jordan Benj F Rev (c) (Maggie L) pastor First Bapt Ch h 1113 E Nash.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1113 East Nash Street, minister Benjiman Jorden, 50; wife Maggie, 44; and children Benjiman F., 16, Mary B., 14, Milford L., 12, Odis, 11, Willard, 10, Irene C., 8, and James D., 6.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1113 East Nash Street, renting for $20/month, W.P.A. project laborer Oscar Ellis, 50; wife Mamie, 48; children Henry, 23, laborer, Estell, 22, housekeeper, Aja, 21, waiter, Charles, 20, deliveryman for Moore’s Drug, James, 18, Bessie, 17, Herbert, 15, Leroy, 13, Fred, 8, Mamie, 10, and Clarence, 5; and adopted children Annie, 15, and Rosco Jones, 13.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, September 2017.

Obituary of Rosetta Whitley Ellis.

Wilson Daily Times, 2 April 1949.

In the 1910 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Counsel Whitley, 27; wife Annis, 24; and children Alice Ida, 4, Matha J., 2, and Rosa Ella, 6 months.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: tenant farmer Concil Whitley, 42; wife Annis, 37; and children Ida, 14, Jane M., 12, Rosetta, 10, Isaca, 8, Dortha, 6, Council Jr., 4, and Mina, 2, plus widower brother William Haskins, 34.

In the 1930 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: tenant farmer Council Whitley, 50; wife Annis, 44; and children Ida, 24, Jane, 23, Rosetta, 20, Hezekiah, 18, Dorothy, 16, Council Jr., 14, Mimy, 13, Mandy L., 9, Mary M., 6, and Ruth L., 3, plus widowed mother Mimy Whitley, 70, and lodger John H. Dean, 20.

Rosetta Ellis died 29 March 1949 in Spring Hill township, Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 6 October 1910 in Wilson to Council Whitley and Anis Batts; was married; and worked in farming. She was buried in Bethel cemetery. Informant was Eddie Ellis.

 

122 North Pender Street.

The thirty-third in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1908; 2 stories; Alice Jones house; locally rare two-thirds I house, with rear ell and added side wing; aluminum sided; Jones was a schoolteacher.”

This house does not appear on the 1908 or 1913 Sanborn fire insurance maps. The house shown as 122 Pender on those maps was across the street, next to Saint John A.M.E. Zion. On the 1922 map, it is labeled under a new number, 119 Pender. That number is now the address of Saint John, and lot once designated #122 is now the site of the Saint John parsonage, 121 North Pender.

Sanborn fire insurance map, Wilson, N.C., 1908.

This house, then, was built after 1922, and Alice Helena Albright Jones did not occupy it until after World War II.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: building carpenter David Davis, 47; wife Hepsie, 47; and sons Frank D., 22, tire shop laborer, and Willie T., 19, tobacco factory factory. The family rented the house for $6/month.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Edward Pender, 33; wife Minnie, 26; cook Annie B. Holmes, 39; Walter Johnson, 49, and his wife Winnie, 27. Edward Pender’s occupation was driving a car for Walter Johnson.

The 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C. city directory lists tobacco worker Elijah Ellis at 122 Pender.

Alice Jones died 29 October 1957. Per her death certificate, she was 65 years old; born in Lexington, North Carolina, to John Albright and Alice Adams; died in a car accident in Durham, North Carolina; was a retired school teacher; and resided at 122 Pender Street. Robert L. Jones, 122 Pender, was informant.

Photograph taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, May 2017.

Cemeteries, no. 17: the Littleton and Judie Ellis family.

This small family cemetery is completely hidden in a copse of trees just outside the gates of Wiggins Mill Water Treatment Plant on Forest Hills Road in Wilson. Until relatively recently, this area — nearly four miles south of downtown — was outside city limits. Few gravestones are visible in the tangle of catbrier, pines and oak saplings, but several oblong indentations — some feet deep — mark burial sites just as clearly. This cemetery holds the remains of several generations of the family of Littleton and Judy Barnes Ellis, a couple born in slavery. The couple and at least four of their children — Bryant, Lucy, Maggie, Lizzie Sarah — are buried here on land that once belonged to Littleton Ellis.

The view from the edge of the woods:

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The dark patches at right are a series of sunken graves:

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  • Maggie Ellis Darden (1886-1969). Gone to take her rest. We loved her but God loved her best. The family.

In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farm laborer Littleton Ellis, 30, wife Judah, 21, and children Bryant, 4, and Martha, 3.

In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Littleton Ellis, 45; wife Judah, 30; and children Bryant, 14, Martha, 12, Patsey, 10, Mary, 8, Bud, 6, Thomas, 4, Rose, 2, and James, 1.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Littleton Ellis, 73; wife Judy, 55; and children Lucy, 21, Littleton, 18, Sarah, 16, Maggie, 14, Nettie, 12, and Minnie, 10.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Wiggins Mill Road, farmer Littleton Ellis, 27; his mother Judie, 62; and sisters Lucy, 30, Sarah, 24, Maggie, 23, and Lettie, 21.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Judie Ellis, 80, widow; children Lucy, 32, Litt, 30, and Maggie, 25; and granddaughter Manerva Barnes, 22.

On 18 March 1923, George Darden, 35, married Maggie Ellis, 25, in Wilson County. Free Will Baptist minister Tom Thomas performed the ceremony in the presence of Willie Darden, Jonathan Ford, and W.H. Cotton.

In the 1930 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farm laborer George Darden, 42; wife Maggie, 35, and daughter Artelia, 1.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1021 South Mercer Street, laundress Maggie Darden, 46, and daughter Artelia, 11.

Maggie Ellis Darden died 22 September 1969 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 10 March 1886 in Arkansas to Littleton Ellis and Julia Barnes [were the Ellises returned Exodusters?] Informant was Artelia Neal.

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A vault cover hidden under pine needles and creeping foliage:

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  • Rev. Jesse Herring (1890-1956). Gone but not forgotten.

In the 1900 census of Indian Springs township, Wayne County, and the 1910 census of Brogden township, Wayne County, Jessie Herring is listed in the household of his parents Amos and Lucy Herring.

In 1917, Jesse Herring registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he lived at 618 Lodge Street, Wilson; was born 23 September 1892 in Mount Olive, North Carolina; worked as a carpenter for George Whitley in Wilson County; and had a dependent wife and two children.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: at 413 Lodge Street, carpenter Jessie Herring, 27; wife Sarah, 33; and children Daisy, 5, Minnie, 4, and Mary, 2.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Jessie Herring, 34; wife Sarah, 36; and children Daniel, 13, Minnie, 12, Mary E., 11, Amos, 9, Maggie, 7, James L., 3, and Mary E., 1 month. Herring paid $3/month in rent. [Next door, the household of Sarah’s brother Bryant Ellis.]

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Highway 301, farmer Jessie Herring, 53; wife Sarah, ; and children Dazel, 25, Amos, 20, James L., 14, Mary Elizabeth, 9, George R., 7, and Ruby Lee, 6. Herring owned his house.

Jessie Herring died 5 June 1956 in Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 23 September 1889 in Wayne County to Amos Herring and Lucy Whitfield; was a farmer; was married to Sarah Herring; and was buried in Ellis cemetery. Sarah Herring was informant.

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  • Lizzie Sarah Ellis Herring (1884-1964). We loved you. She was the sunshine of our home.

Sarah Ellis Herring died 9 July 1964 in Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 9 May 1891 in Wilson County to Littleton Ellis and Judy [last name unknown]; was widow of Jessie Herring; and was buried in the family cemetery. Informant was Amos Herring. [This is a fine example of a Clarence Best gravestone and features many of his signature motifs.]